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Full text of "The Register of the Lynn Historical Society"

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REYNOLDS HTSTORRStt. 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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OF THE 



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LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 



POP THE YEAR 1697 



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LYNN, MASS. 

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OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1898. 

I 

f 

I 

President^ 
PHILIP A. CHASE. 

E 

•'. 

Vice-President, 
BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Treasurer, 

CHARLES F. PEIRCE. 

Reeo rding Seer eta ry , 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL. 

Corresponding Secretary, 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Philip A. Chase. Rufus Kimball. 

William S. Burrill. Charles II. Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. James S. Newhall. 

John C. Houghton. Charles F. Peirce. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Henry F. Taplev. 

David N. Johnson. John Woodbury, 

Frank Keene. 



LYXX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COMMITTEES. 



William S. Bu 
Frank Keene. 

Alfred Cross. 



Coutmrllee on Room. 

Charles H. Newhall. 
Henry B. Sprague. 
Arthur J. Phillips. 



Philip A. Chase. 
Charles F. Pejrce. 
Charles C. Fry. 

To Secure 'Publl 

Nathan M. Hawkes. 
John Woodbury. 
Roli.in E. Harmon. 



Finance. 

Luther S. Johnson. 
David II. Sweetser. 
Lucian Newhall. 

?n of Old Town and City Records, 

Philip A. Chase. 
Samuel A. Guilford. 
Amos F. Breed. 



r To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens. 



James S. Newhall. 
William Stone. 
John Woodbury. 
Henry W t . Johnson. 
Howard K. Sander; 



ON. 



Rufus Kimball. 
William P. Sargent 
James H. Richards. 
George B. Currier. 
S. Oliver Breed. 



Samuel 



Stewart. 



Harriet L. Matthews. 
Elizabeth E. Rule. 
James H. Van Buren. 
William P. Sargent. 



Library. 



Mary G. Brown. 

George H. Martin. 
John P. Woodbury. 
David N. Johnson. 



Lectures and Public Meetings. 
Henry F. Tapley. Micajah P. Clough. 



Philip A. Chase. 
Howard Mudge Newhall. 
William S. Burrill. 
Charles H. Newhall. 



May L. Sheldon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Harriet K. Clough. 



Genealogy 



John L. Parker. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
William P. Sargent. 
Charles Buffum. 
John C. Houghton. 
Henry W. Johnson. 



Enoch S. Johnson. 
Percy Chase. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Emma F. P. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

increase of Membership and Admission of Members. 

m S. Bun rill. S. Arthur Bubier. 



Samit£L A. Guilford. 

irles F. Peikce. 
v, u.liam E. Neal, 
John Lewis Robinsonl 
M. Adelaide Bubier. 
SosAX T. Hill. 



Emma F. P. Mower. 
Katherine R. Moulton. 
Lucy E. B. Newhall. 
Joanna A. Busier. 
Warren M. Breed. 



Publications and Printing. 

Howard Mudge Xewhall, Nathan M. Hawkes. 

Henry F. Taplev. Enoch S. Johnson. 

James S. Newhall, 



George S. Bliss. 
Charles S. Fuller. 
Elliott Johnson. 
Mary G. Brown. 



Photography. 

Edward F. Bacheller 
John W. Darcy. 
J. Fred In galls. 



George H. Martin. 
Charles J. H. Woodbury 
Sale ie H. Hacker. 
Kufus Kimball. 



Documents aud Papers. 

David N, Johnson. 



Howard K. Sanderson. 
Ella D. Bartlett. 
Charles E. Clark. 



John Woodbury. 
Charles H. Newhall. 
Stephen L. Breed. 
Louise S. Earle. 
Warren M. Breed, 
Samuel A. Guilford. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 
Caroline P. Heath. 



Historical Relics.— 

William Lloyd Garrison, 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Joseph B. Breed. 
Charles Buffum. 
Emma H. Breed. 



Marking Historical Locations. 

Rufus Kimball. Isaac F. Galloupe. 

.L>hn L. Parker. Pjchard J. Nichols. 

Frank L. Earl. Arthur B. Mudge. 
James LI. Richards. 



Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Wilbur F. Newhall. 
kufus Kimball. 



Necrology. 



David N. Johnson. 
Israel A. Newhall. 



6 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Compilation of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

David N. Johnson. Benjamin N. Johnson. 

Israel A. Newhall. William P. Sargent. 

John C. Houghton. Harriet L. Matthews. 

George H. Martin. Elizabeth E, Rule. 

John Woodbury. Mary A. Parsons. 

Geology and Botany. 

Jonathan W. Goodell. D. Gage Hunt. 

Luther Atwood. William W. Lummus. 

Charles Neal Barney. Martin H. Hood. 

Frank F. Brigham. Philip Emerson. 

Walter B. Allen. Lillie B. Allen. 
Peter M. Neal. 

Reception at Public Meetings. 

William S. BuRrill. Marion W. Newhall. 

Walter E. Symonds. Caroline P. Heath. 

Fred H. Nichols. Emily G. Pinkham, 

Henry W. Breed. Emma F. P. .Mower. 

May L. Sheldon. Caroline S. In galls. 

Ida J. Tapley. Lillian G. Breed. 

And Members of the Council. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COPY OF THE CALL FOR A PRELIMINARY MEETING, 

Being a Printed Circular of Invitation Mailed to a 
Large Number of People. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

You are invited to attend a meeting, to be held in 
Oxford Club Hall, Washington Square, on Friday, 
Evening, December iS, 1S96, having for its purpose the 
formation of a Lynn Historical Society. There are 
few cities in the Linked States that were settled at an 
earner date than "the towne of Lynn," and while we 
may be many years later than our sister cities and towns 
in the formation of a Society that shall have for its 
special object the gathering of valuable relics and data 
iu connection with our local history, there is still much 
that can be accomplished. In addition to her w r onderful 
success and growth, Lynn has an interesting and honor- 
able: history, and it should be our duty and our pleasure to 
collect and arrange for the information of our successors 
so much that is worthy to be preserved. 

It is not intended to form, a Society that shall be 
burdensome, either in money or time, and it is hoped 
' that the interest may be such that a large number may 
give it their approval and support. 

The hour of meeting; will be at half-past seven o'clock. 
i lie first half-hour will be reserved for a social renewal 



6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

of old-time acquaintance, and the meeting will be called 
to order at eight o'clock. 

Very truly yours, 



Philip A. Chase. 
John C. Houghton. 
Charles H. Newhall. 
Alfred Cross. 
Joseph B. Breed. 
Samuel A. Guilford. 
Charles Buffum. 
Israel A. Xewhall. 
Warren M. Breed. 
Micajah P. Clough. 
Luciax Xewhall. 
Enoch S. Johnson. 
Amos P. Tapley. 
Thomas P. Nichols. 
William P. Sargent. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Jerome Ingalls. 
Charles S. Sweetser. 
David N. Johnson. 
William A. Attwill. 
George H. Plummer. 
John Woodbury. 
William S. Burrill. 
James E. Jenkins. 
Charles S. Purinton. 
Henry F. Tapley. 
James S. Newhall. 
David H. Sweetser. 
Jacob M. Lewis. 
Amos F. Breed. 
Frederick L. Bubier. 
Harrison Xewhall. 
Joseph M. Powell. 
Eugene Barry. 
John P. Woodbury. 
Wilbur F. Xewhall. 
Henry A. Pevear. 



George Burrill Currier. 
Stephen F. Breed. 
Dean Peabody. 
Earl A. Mower. 
Charles E. Parsons. 
Richard Breed. 
Perley B. Mansfield. 
Samuel J. Hollis. 
George H. Chadwell. 
Franklin L. Chase. 
Charles B. Tebbetts. 
Martin H. Hood. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Frank Kee.ve. 
Flo ward Mudge Xewhall 
William W. Lummus. 
Henry B. Sprague. 
Walter E. Symonds. 
Charles S. Fuller. 
C. J. H. Woodbury. 
Luther S. Johnson. 
Frank B. Rowell. 
Rufus Kimball. 
Benjamin F. Spinney. 
Fred E. Baker. 
Joseph G. Brown. 
Benjamin N. Johnson. 
Henry- W. Breed. 
William O. Newhall. 
Walter O. Faulkner. 
Charles Orrin Breed. 
Charles C. Fry. 
Arthur S. Moore. 
Henry W. Johnson. 
Charles O. Beede. 
Jesse L. Attwill. 
William Henry Harney. 



Terry A. Xewhall. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



HE PRELIMINARY MEETING 



About one hundred persons assembled at Oxford Club 
Hall on Friday evening, December 18, 1S96, in response 
to the printed invitation to meet for the formation of a 
Lynn Historical Society. Hon. Abner C. Goodell, Jr., 
was present by invitation and gave valuable suggestions. 
Remarks strongly favoring the formation and work of such 
a Society were also made by several present, and a tempo- 
rary organization was effected by choice of the following 
l officers : 



Temporary Chairman, PHILIP A. CHASE- 



I - 

Temporary Vice-Chairman, BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 
Temporary Treasurer, CHARLES F. PEIRCE. 
J Temporary Clerk, WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



Committee to Prepare a Constitution and By-Laws. 

Henry F. Tapley. Frank Keene. 

Rufus Kimball. James S. Newhall. 

Rollix E. Harmon. Nathan M. Hawkes. 



Committee to Nominate Permanent Officers. 



1 

I 

Charles H. Newhall. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Charles S. Sweetser. 

Wa.lt er E. Symonds. 
I 

The meeting adjourned subject to the call of the offi- 
cers and committees appointed. 



IO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MEETING OF THE COMMITTEES. 



By invitation of Mr. Henry F. Tapley, the Officers 
and Committees met at his residence, No. 280 Ocean St., 
at a dinner party, on Wednesday evening, December 30, 
1896. At this time publications and constitutions of differ- 
ent historical societies were examined, letters of suggestion 
from officers of other societies were read, and matters per- 
taining to the proper formation of the Society were carefully 
considered. This was one of the most important formative 
meetings of any of the early meetings, as at this time 
the organization of the work was definitely planned as 
afterward completed by the Committees, and was adopted 
by the Society at a meeting held on Wednesday evening, 
January 13, 1897. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 



ORGANIZATION. 



On Wednesday evening, January 13, 1S97, a meeting 
which was called as the first annual meeting of the vol- 
untary association known as the Lynn Historical Soci- 
ety was held at Oxford Club Hall. The Constitution and 
By-Laws presented by the Committee were adopted, and 
permanent officers were elected for the year 1S97 as follows : 

President, PHILIP A. CHASE. 

Vice President, BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 
Treasurer, CHARLES F. PEIRCE. 

Recording Secy, HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL. 
Corresponding Secy, W I L L I A M S . BURR ILL. 



Members of the Council. 
Philip A. Chase. Rufus Kimball. 

William S. Burrtll. Charles H. Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Nathan M. Hav/kes. James S. Newhall. 

John C. Houghton. Charles F. Peirce. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Henry F. Tapley. 

David N. Johnson. John Woodbury. 

I Frank Keene. 

It was voted to incorporate the Society, and the fifteen 
saenabers of the Council were directed to procure the incor- 
poration. In accordance therewith the members of the 
Council individually signed an "Agreement of Association" 
bearing the date of this meeting. Following is a copy 
01 the Agreement, and a copy of the legal "Notice of 
First Meeting^ 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



COPY OF AGREEMENT OF ASSOCIATION AND 
CERTIFICATION. 



We, whose names are hereto subscribed, do, by 
this Agreement, associate ourselves with the intention 
to constitute a corporation according to the provisions 
of the one hundred and fifteenth Chapter of the Public 
Statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and 
the acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto. 

The name by which the Corporation shall be known is 

Lynx Historical Society. 

The purpose for which the Corporation is consti- 
tuted is to investigate, record, and perpetuate the history 
of the town of Lynn, and to collect, hold, and preserve 
documents, books, memoirs, relics and all other matters 
illustrating its history or that of individuals identified 
with it. 

The place within which the Corporation is estab- 
lished or located is the city of Lynn, within said Com- 
monwealth. 

The amount of its capital stock is none. 

In Witness Whereof, we have hereunto set our 
hands, this thirteenth day of January in the year eighteen 
hundred „and ninety-seven. 

Frank Keene. Benjamin N. Johnson. 

John Woodbury. Rupus Kimball. 

Charles H. Newhall. John C. Houghton. 

Philip A. Chase. Henry F. Taplev. 

James S. Newhall. 

David N. Johnson. 

Howard Mudge Newhall. 

William S. Burrill. 

Samuel A. Guilford. 

Nathan M. IIawkks. 

Charles F. Peirce. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



1.1 



}...}>; SS. February 2?t,>i, iBgj. 

I certify that I have served the foregoing notice upon 
< ach of the subscribers by copy served as follows : Mailed 
! ■• me to each of the subscribers to his post office address 
»even days at least before the day fixed for the first meeting. 

Howard Mudge Newhall. 



Essex ss. 

Subscribed and sworn to. 

Before me. 



February 2~th, i&gj. 



Benjamin X. Johnson, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1 ,Y X N HI STO R 1 C A L S O C 1 1 1 T V r . 



COPY OF THE NOTICE OF FIRST MEETING 



To Frank Keene, John Woodbury, Charles H. Xewhall. 
Philip A. Chase, Benjamin N. Johnson, Rufus Kimball, 
John C Houghton, Henry F. Tapley, James S. Xew- 
hall, David N. Johnson, Howard Mudge Xewhall, 
William S. Burrill, Samuel A. Guilford, Nathan M. 

H A W KES j A N I ) C HA RLES F. P EI RCE : 

You arc hereby notified that the first meeting of 
the subscribers to an agreement to associate themselves 
with the intention to constitute a corporation to be known 
by the name of 

Lynn Historical Society, 

dated January 13th, 1897, for the purpose of organ- 
izing said corporation by the adoption of by-laws, and 
election of officers, and the transaction of such other 
business as may properly come before the meeting, will 
be held on Saturday, the twenty-seventh day of Febru- 
ary, at eight o'clock, p.m., at the residence of Mr. 
Benjamin N. Johnson, No. 109 Nahant Street, Lynn, 
Mass. 

Howard Mudge Xewhall, 

One of the Subscribers to said Agreement, 
February iq, 1897. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



B Y - L A W S . 



5 Adopted at the residence of Benjamin X. Johnson, February :27th, 1897, by the fifteen 
gentlemen appointed to procure incorporation. Approved by meeting; of the Society 
at Oxford Club Hal!, on May 4th, 1897.) 



ARTICLE 1. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 

ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second Wed- 
nesday evening in January, time and place to be determined 
by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. A less number rnay 
adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direction of 
the Council, or President, and shall be called upon the 
written request of twenty members. 



ARTICLE III. 

I 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 



l6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-President, 
Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Treas- 
urer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from the 
members of the Council. They shall perform the. usual 
duties of such officers, and such other duties as the Coun- 
cil may require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the 
annual assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July 
first of each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. I 7 



COPY OF CHARTER. 



/VO, 717$. 



€ommorn»eaft£ ol ffidssacfiuscfi?, 



Be it Known That whereas Philip A. Chase, 
Charles F. Peirce, Howard Mudge Newhall, Rufus 
Kimball, Nathan M. Hawkes, Henry F. Tapley, 
James S. Newhall, Frank Keene, John Woodbury, 
John C. Houghton, S. A. Guilford, Benjamin N. 
Johnson, David N. Johnson, William S. Burrill 
and Charles H. Newhall, have associated themselves 
with the intention of forming a corporation under the 
name of the Lynn Historical Society, for the pur- 
pose of investigating, recording and perpetuating the 
history of the Town of Lynn, and collecting, holding, 
and preserving, documents, books, memoirs, relics, and 
all other matters illustrating its history, or that of indi- 
viduals identified with it, and have complied with the 
provisions of the Statutes of this Commonwealth in such 
case made and provided, as appears from the certificate 
of the President, Treasurer, Recording Secretary and 
Councillors having the powers of Directors of said corpo- 
ration, duly approved by the Commissioner of Corpo- 
rations, and recorded in this office : 

Mow, Therefore, I, William M. Olin, Secretary 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, do hereby certify 
that said Philip A. Chase, Charles F. Peirce, How- 
ard Mudge Newhall, Rufus Kimball, Nathan M. 



iS LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Hawk.es, Henry F. Tapley, James S. Newhall, 
Frank Keene, John Woodbury, John C. Houghton, 

S. A. Guilford, Benjamin X. Johnson, David N, 
Johnson, William S. Burrill and Charles H. New- 
hall, their associates and successors, are legally organ- 
ized and established as and are hereby made an existing 
corporation under the name of the Lynn Historical 
Society, with the powers, rights and privileges, and 
subject to the limitations, duties, and restrictions which 
by law appertain thereto. 

Witness ray official signature hereunto sub- 
scribed, and the seal of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts hereunto affixed this twenty- 
seventh day of April in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
seven. 

William M. Olin, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



[Seal] 



I LV.W HISTORICAL SOCIETY. IQ 




SEAL OF THE LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

At a meeting of the Council, held on June i, 1897, 
at the residence of Howard Mudge Newhall, "The 
Committee on Publications and Printing were directed to 
procure the design for a Seal, and a Seal for the Society." 

The illustration of the Seal above, designed by 
Frank II. Nichols, under the direction of Nathan M. 
Hawkes of the Committee, was adopted, and the follow- 
ing is a description : — 

A circle enclosing a representation of the Old Tunnel Meeting 
House; on its right a floating streamer bearing the words — "Old 
Tunnel ;" on the left another streamer containing the date (16S2) of 
its erection in Lynn Common. Above the meeting house and within 
a scroll are the words — * ; Lynn, Mass., Settled 1629." The margin of 
the upper half of the circle contains the words — " Lynn Historical 
Society," and in the top background is a representation of an iron 
kettle — the first casting made in America, at the Saugus Iron Works: 
the date of its casting (1642) appears below the lines describing its 
handle. In the lower margin of the circle is a wreath design, over 
which hangs a scroll bearing the words — ''Incorporated 1S97" — the 
date of incorporation of the Society. 



20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



RECORDING SECRETARY'S REPORT 

At the First Annual Meeting of the Lynn Historical Society at 
Oxford Club Hall, Wednesday Evening, January 12, 1S98. 



At this first annual meeting of the Lynx Histori- 
cal Society the members have cause for congratulating 
themselves on the substantial progress which lias been made 
in perfecting the proper organization of the Society. While, 
to a certain extent, time has necessarily been spent in the 
adoption of By-Laws and governing rules, by the wise 
direction and advice of the Committee who drafted and 
recommended the By-Laws, the work has not been cumbered 
and hampered at the outset by an elaborate code of rules, 
but has been organized under a simple, direct, and liberal 
policy that has proved sufficient for all present uses. 

The first meeting of the voluntary association known 
as the Lynn Historical Society was held at Oxford 
Club Hall, on Friday evening, December 18, 1896, in 
answer to a circular of invitation signed by seventy-five 
leading citizens. About one hundred persons immediately 
expressed a wish to become members of the Society. 

A second meeting was held on January 13, 1S97, at 
which officers were elected, and the Committee appointed 
at the first meeting presented a set of By-Laws, It was 
voted to apply for an Act of Incorporation, and the fifteen 
gentlemen who had been selected as members of the coun- 
cil were directed to procure the Incorporation of the Society. 
These fifteen gentlemen met at the residence of Mr. Ben- 
jamin N. Johnson, No. 109 Nahant Street, on Saturday 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21 



evening, February 27, 1897, in response to a regular legal 
notice, and ratified the Articles of Agreement, which were 
forwarded to the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

fThe Charter, numbered 7175, bears the date of April 
27. 1897. In aceordanee with the By-Laws the members 
of the voluntary association became charter members of 
the incorporated Lynx Historical Society. 

The report was made to the Society at a meeting held 
in Oxford Club Hall, on the evening of Tuesday, May 4, 
1897. At this meeting it was voted that the admission fee 
for membership should be one dollar, and annual dues two 
dollars, covering for one year from July 1 of each year. 

A full list of Committees was appointed by the Coun- 
cil, at a meeting held at the residence of Mr. Philip A. 
Chase, Baltimore Street, on the evening of March 18, 1S97, 
the members of Committees being duly notified by the 
Secretary. 

On Wednesday afternoon, June 30, by invitation of 
Mrs. Mary A. Parsons and the citizens of Lynnfield Cen- 
tre, the Society, represented by about fifty members, en- 
joyed a most delightful and interesting excursion to the 
historic points of interest at Lynnfield Centre, being hand- 
somely received at the Town Flail by the clergyman and 
leading gentlemen and ladies of the town, and provided 
with a bountiful lunch at the home of Mrs. Parsons. Hon. 
Abner C. Goodell, Jr., of Salem, a member of the Society, 
and Mr. Edwin M. Bacon, the author of " Walks and 
Drives about Boston," were members of the part}'. 

At the meeting of May 4, 1897, the Hon. Nathan M. 
Hawkes read a valuable paper on the subject of " Colonial 
Land Titles," which he assured the Society would be pub- 
lished in permanent form at some time in the future, being 
a part of some articles which he was intending forpublica- 

I 
i 

! 

1 



22 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

lion when completed. Interesting remarks were made on 
the following queries. 

i. The names of Lynn soldiers who responded to the Lexington 
alarm in 1775 ? 

2. Who were the first non-voting, non-resistant abolitionists ? 

3. When and where did the New Light Schism originate ? Who 

were its earliest adherents in Lynn ? How was New 
Light Hill related to it ? 

4. Who was Richard Papoon who lived in Lynn about 1776 ? 

5. Where was Cartland's saw pit ? Who was Cartland ? Where 

was the first saw-mill in Lynn ? 

6. About what time were the walls built in Lynn Woods ? Were 

they built at the expense of the town ? 



At the meeting of November 11, 1897, Mr. David X. 
Johnson read a paper on the Life and Writings of the late 
Cyrus Mason Trac\ T , and Mr. Benjamin X. Johnson made 
remarks, and read selections from the writings of his Grand- 
father, Benjamin F. Newhall, Esq. 

On December 30, 1897, the Society was favored with 
an illustrated lecture on King's Lynn, England, by Ven. 
Archdeacon James LI. Van Buren, a member of the Society, 
the meeting being held in the new building at Xo. 90 Ex- 
change street. Letters, papers, and other matters in re- 
gard to King's Lynn, which had been received at various 
times from John James Coulton, Esq., of King's Lynn, 
were read by the Secretary. 

At the meeting of Xovember 11, 1S97, the Committee 
on Llistorical Relics were given authority", by vote of the 
Society, to conduct a loan exhibition, and the Committee 
on marking Historical Locations were given authority to 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 

expend not exceeding $75 in placing wooden tablets in 
appropriate locations. 

Three members of the Society died early in the year, 
Charles Edward Parsons, Esq., Lynn's honored City Clerk, 
who died January 17, 1897 ; Mr. James Albert Breed, who 
died February 3, 1S97 : and Mr. George Henry Rich, who 
died March 19, 1S97. 

In November, 1897, the Council began to feel the 
necessity of a location for the Society, as many gifts had 
been received, and it would soon become necessary to pro- 
vide a place for their proper arrangement and keeping. A 
room was therefore rented in the new brick and stone build- 
• ing of the Lynn Gas and Electric Co., No. 90 Exchange 
street, with the privilege of storing valuable papers and 
relics in a large vault on the first floor, the room of the 
Society being on the second floor. The room was soon 
found to be very useful and convenient for meetings of 
the Council and Committees. 

During its first year the Society has been the recipient 
of the following gifts : — 

Two volumes : u Story of the Hutchinson s," from John W. 
Hutchinson. 

Two volumes: Volume I and Volume II of the History of 
Lynn, from Israel Augustus Newhall and Howard Mudge Newhall. 

The remnants of an old school library and a bell which had 
rung 7000 pupils to school, from Miss Emeline Mansfield, a former 
Lynn school teacher. 

An ancient store account-book, from Hon. Amos F. Breed, 
containing the record of purchases made by many old and well- 
known Lynn citizens. 

Three volumes : Centennial Memorial ; Lynn, Her First Two 
Hundred and Fifty Years ; Exercises at the Dedication of the 
City Hall; from Joseph W. Attwill, Esq., City Clerk. 



24 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Continental Money and Fractional Currency, from Miss Mary 

G. Drown. 

Twenty-seven Quaker marriage certificates, containing the 
names of eight hundred and thirteen signatures, covering a period 
from 17 15 to 1772. Epistle from yearly meeting of Friends, Lon- 
don, 1779. Paper from quarterly meeting of Friends, 1775. Paper 
from Lynn Quaker meeting disowning George Sawyer who enlisted 
as a privateer, 1779. letter written by a Salem Quaker girl, 1776. 
Old deed of land on Lynn Commons, 1772. Old deed of land in 
Salem. Old style letter written in 1740. Some notes of corres- 
pondence, 1S08. Notice from Selectmen of Salem to Caleb Euf- 
fum, 1696. A bond for seventy pounds, 1725. Eight receipts 
and bills, and fragment of a will. A bill of lading, 1792. Ac- 
counts current of 1734 and 173S. Anti-slavery reminiscences. 
A New Orleans raffle advertisement of a slave and a horse to- 
gether. A receipt from the Adams Express Co. of a slave. A 
receipted bill of sale of a slave. A deed, or bill of sale, of a fam- 
ily of four slaves. A deed from the Governor of Georgia of land 
taken from the Creek Indians. Tinder-box and candle moulds. 
The above named papers and articles from Mr. Charles Buftum. 

Two foot stoves. One warming pan. One tin kitchen. One 
old style sheet iron stove. From Abby L. Breed. 

George Parrott's shoemaker's seat and kit, from his sons. 

Old eagle, from belfry of Lynn Academy, from Mrs. Frank 
D. Allen. 

Seven volumes Lynn Record, 1831 to 1837, from estate of 
Jonathan Buflum. 

Forged door latch, from old Hood house, from Mr. Martin H. 
Hood. 

Names and sketches of Lynn Revolutionary soldiers, from 
Richard I. Attwili. 

One volume : Constitutions L T .S., and Mass., from Mrs. Tribou. 

Silver medal, presented to Nathan Phillips as the best shot in 
the old Lynn Rifle Corps, from Mr. J. A. Smith. 

Old mortar and pestle used by Alonzo Lewis, Lynn bard and 
historian, from his sons, Arthur and Llewellvn Lewis. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



I 



Handsome black walnut book case, from the family of the 
late Hob. Samuel M. Bubier. 

A nearly complete file of old Lynn directories. A map of 
Lynn, issued in 1S72. Engraving, departure of Lynn Light In- 
fantry for the Civil War. from Mr. Alfred Cross. 

One volume The Lynn Woods, from the author, Hon. Nathan 
M. Llawkes. 

One volume History of Lynnfield, from the author, Mr. 
Thomas B. Wellman. 

One old plate map of Lynn, from Stephen L. Breed. 

There were two well attended meetings of the volun- 
tary association, three meetings of the incorporated society. 
and six meetings of the Council, during the year, besides 
the different meetings of Committees and sub-Committees. 

The present membership of the Society is two hundred 
and fifty members. New members are presented at almost 
every meeting of the Council for election. The Committee 
in drafting the By-Laws placed no restriction of age, or 
sex, or place of nativity, as a qualification for membership, 
and any person whose name is approved by vote of the 
Council is eligible. 

The work of the Society has been successfully com- 
menced, and the Lynn Historical Society has in one year 
taken a respected place in the opinions of the people of 
Lynn. It has associated together a company of loyal sons 
and daughters who feel interested to preserve and perpetu- 
ate the history and historical associations of the old town, 
and it can but come to pass that in the common interest in 
this Society, and in the work done by each other, a new 
s}*mpathy and an intellectual force has been set at work 
that in time will make its influence felt out of, and beyond, 
the Society itself, at our social affairs, our clubs, and other 
events, in furnishing new thoughts, renewals of old ac- 



26 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

quaintance, and a feeling of common interest in making 
known to ourselves, as well as to the outside world, the 
historical events of our early connection, even if only as 
loyal citizens our ancestors and ourselves have participated, 
for nearly two hundred and sixty-nine years, since that 
June day in 1629. Lynn's history is a part of the history 
of the United States of America. Our citizens have par- 
ticipated and assisted in every colonial and national war in 
American history, and we have a right to proclaim an 
honorable place in history which our ancestors seem to 
have left for us to make prominent. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



27 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Charles F. Peirce, Treasurer, 
in account with the Lynn Historical Society. 



Dr. 
rS'96 Dec. tS To contributions at meeting', Dec. iS, 1S97, $14 00 
f Fees and annual dues paid by 141 raem- 



iSgy June iS 



to 



1898 Jan. 13 



bers, at i>j.oo . 



J Fees and annual dues paid by 2 mem- 
bers, at $2.00 4 00 

Fees and annual dues paid by 28 mem- 
bers, at 31.00 28 00 



3409 00 



Cr. 

1S97 Jan. 6 By paid Oxford Club for hall $12 co 

13 G. H. & A. L. Nichols, printing . 2 25 

Thos. P. Nichols, printing .... 2S 30 

Oxford Club 

Thos. P. Nichols, 300 stamp, envel., 
Howard Mudge NewhaH, postage, 
Howard Mudge Nev/hali, stamped 

envelopes ... 

G. H. 6c A. L. Nichols, printing . 
B. N. Johnson, for incorporation 

papers and charter 

Thos. P. Nichols, printing .... 
G. H. & A. L. Nichols, printing . 
Thos. P. Nichols. 200 stamp, envel., 
Cash balance in Central National Bank . . 



Feb. 


30 
4 


Mar. 


29 


May 


29 
7 


May 


7 


June 


9 


July 


1 




1 


Aug. 
S9S Jan. 


7 
13 



12 


00 


7 


75 


5 


00 


2 


95 


6 


00 


7 


75 


17 


5° 


4 


5° 


5 


75 


359 


05 



$469 00 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



NECROLOGY. 



CHARLES EDWARD PARSONS, 
City Clerk of Lynn, died Sunday morning, Jan. 17, 1S97. 
He was the son of Ebenezer and Sally H. Parsons, and 
was born in Boston, Aug. 1, 1842, removing to Lynn with 
his parents at the age of three years. Passing through the 
lower grades of the public schools, he graduated from the 
High School in 1S58. 

Like most young men of Lynn at that period he en- 
gaged in the shoe business, entering- the factoiw of Graves 
& Sanborn, on Central Square, and later formed a partner- 
ship with one of his employers, under the firm name of 
Sanborn & Parsons, and was engaged in the manufacture 
of shoes until some time in the year 1S75. 

The following January he was elected City Clerk, 
and from that time held the office continuously until his 
death, his marked integrity, ability and fitness for the 
position having been recognized by men of all parties in 
twenty-one consecutive City Councils. 

Deceased was connected with the City Clerks' Asso- 
ciation, which he was active in forming, and won the 
warm friendship of all its members. He was also promi- 
nently identified with the Masonic fraternity, being a Past 
Master of Mount Carmel Lodge, A, F. and A. M., a mem- 
ber of Sutton Chapter of the Royal Arch, and Past Com- 
mander of Olivet Commandery, K. T. 

The City Council passed resolutions expressive of the 
city's loss, and appreciative of the sterling merits of Mr. 
Parsons as an official and a man, and many of the mem- 
bers paid affectionate tributes to his memory. 



CHARLES EDWARD PARSONS. 



GEORGE HENRY RICH. 












I r 






JLY.N'X HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



October 4, 1883, Mr. Parsons married Katherine M., 
daughter of Loring M. and Julia A. Parrott. Two sons 
were born to them, who were six and four years of age, 

respectively, at the time of his death. 



• 

GEORGE HENRY RICH, 

Who died in Lynn, March 19, 1897, was born in Bolton, 
Mass., and was the son of Daniel and Sarah S. (Town- 
send) Rich, who resided on Shepard Street many years. 
He came to Lynn when quite young, where he resided 
until his death. He was employed for several years 
by Cutter, Tower & Co., of Boston, and was for a time 
purchasing agent of the New York and New England 
Railroad Company. Later, when the New England Tele- 
phone Company was engaged in burying wires, he was 
employed as one of the Superintendents of the work. 

He was active in politics, and a prominent member of 
the Ward 3 Republican Club, and one of the Secretaries 
of the Republican State Committee. For several years he 
was clerk in the office of the Lynn Board of Assessors. 

During the war he served in the Eleventh Unattached 
Company, M.V.M ., in 1864. He was a member of Post 5, 
G.A.R., and served as Sergeant Major in 1SS8. In 1891 
and 1892 he was on the staff of the National Commander, 
and later Secretary of the Past National Officers' Asso- 
ciation, G.A.R. 

Mr. Rich was a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery, the Oxford Club, and Old Essex Chapter, Sons 
of the American Revolution. He was a lineal descendant 
of Daniel Town-send, the first Lynn man killed at Lexing- 
ton on the 19th of April, 1775. His age was fifty-six 
years, two months and fifteen days. He left a widow 
and one daughter. 



30 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

JAMES ALBERT BREED. 

James Albert Breed was born in Lynn, April 22, 
iSii, and passed away while in full possession of all his 
powers, on the third day of February, 1S97, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-six years. 

He was of Quaker ancestry, being the son of James 
and Phebe Nichols Breed, and the sixth in descent from 
Allen Breed, the ancestor of the entire Breed family in 
America, who settled in Lynn in 1630. 

In early life, he entered the shoe manufactory of 
Mr. William Bassett, and about the year 1840 formed a 
partnership with Mr. James M. Sargent, under the firm 
name of Sargent & Breed, for the manufacture of shoes. 
This partnership continued until the War of the Rebellion, 
which opened in 1861, when, their business being largely 
in the Southern States, they retired. 

A few years later, Mr. Breed formed a partnership 
with Mr. James W. Hilliker, under the firm name of Breed 
& Plilliker, for dealing in soles and leather. This partner- 
ship continued for several years, and at its close, Mr. 
Breed retired from active business. 

The subject of our sketch was born in the house, still 
standing, at the corner of Broad and Nahant Streets, and 
during his entire life he had lived hardly a stone's throw 
from the place of his birth. For more than half a century 
he had occupied the homestead where he died. 

September 23, 1835, he married Miss Lydia Stodder 
Webb, of Salem, and for sixty years they enjoyed their 
married life, Mrs. Breed passing away on the thirteenth 
day of April, 1S96. 

Of the eight children born to them, three sons died in 
earl} r life. Three daughters became teachers — Annie F., 
who died in 1SS5 while a teacher in the ' '.oxbury Latin 



James Albert Breed. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 31 

School ; Phebe A., for nearly thirty years a teacher in the 
Lynn High School, who died in 1890; and Adelaide L.. 
a teacher in the Ingalls School of this city, who sur- 
vives him. 

Mr. Breed also left two sons, George A. and 
Warren M. 

He was blessed with a very amiable disposition. 
Though bv nature very retiring* he was deeplv interested in 
whatever pertained to public affairs. This was especially 
noticeable during the anti-slavery excitement immediately 
preceding the war. He was an early and pronounced 
I abolitionist. 

He was a man of wide reading, of close observation, 
and an unusually retentive memory. During the later 
years of his life, after retiring from active business, his 
habits of reading, and his garden, in which he always 
found great interest, proved sources of never failing de- 

i !igl,t - 

In his death, not only does the city" lose an exemplary 
citizen, but this Society loses one who was the repository 
of much that would have proved of inestimable value con- 
cerning the past history of our city and of its citizens. 



I/Y".\N HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



MEMBERS OF THE VOLUNTARY ASSOCIATION 

Known as the Lynn Historical Society who became Members of the 
Incorporated Society, April 27, i§97. 



Abbott, Waldo Love joy 15 Prescott Place 

Aborru Charles Henry 297 Summer St. 

Allen, Walter B 2 Walden Si. 

Attvvili, Alfred Mudge 52 Broad St. 

Atwood, Luther 8 Sagamore St. 

Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Baker. Fred E 39 Cherry St. 

Barnes, Wilfred . 53 Mali St. 

Barney, Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

Barry. Eugene 45 Breed St. 

Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Beckford, Amos 9S Hanover St. 

Beede. Charles Otis 25 Hamilton Ave. 

Bennett, Josiah Chase 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Bennett, Larkin Everett 7S Beacon Hill Ave. 

Breed, Amos Franklin 19 Union St. 

Breed, George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

Breed, Henry W r . 48 Nahant St. 

Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Nahant St. 

Breed. Joseph Wesley 60 South Common St. 

Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

Breed, Stephen Lovejoy 15 Newhall St. 

Breed. Warren Mudge 31 Tudor St. 

Brigham, Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

Brown, Joseph Goold 83 Green St. 

Brown, Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Bubier, Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 

Bubier, Mary Adelaide 267 Ocean St. 

Bubier, Mary A 267 Ocean St. 

Bubier, Nathan G 44 Hanover St. 

Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 



LYNIS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 33 

Bubier, Sylvester H., 2d 172 Washington St. 

BrYum. Charles ^50 Union St. 

!',i.!;i;:ch, Charles F 184 Lewis St. 

l>urnil. Abby M. 44 Hanover St. 

B urri II, John Irving 49 Green St. 

Burrill, William A 44 Hanover St. 

Burrill, William Stacker 23 Nahant Place 

Carleton. Joseph G. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

Chad well, George H 192 South Common St. 

Chase. Percy Brooklme, Mass. 

Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

Clark, Charles Edward 89 Broad St. 

dough, Charles Bartlett 39 Cherry St. 

Clough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 

Ciough. Micajah Pratt . ; 253 Ocean St. 

Cross. Alfred 14 Chase St. 

Cross, Charles A S Chase St. 

Currier, George Burrill ior Fayette St. 



Parcy, John W 54 Commercial St. 

Dorman, William E. . 157 Ocean St. 

v 

Earl, Frank L. Elmwood Road, Swampseott 

Earle, Anthony . 4 Henry Place 

Earle, Julia A 4 Henry Place 

Earle, Louise Snow 4 Henry Place 

Faulkner, Walter O _ 33 Endicott St. 

Flanders, George W 109 Newhall St. 

Fogg, Ebenezer Knowlton 23 Lincoln St. 

Frothingham, William A 98 South St. 

Fry, Charles Coffin in Laighton St. 

Fuller, Addie G ' 26 Vine St. 

Fuller. Charles Sylvester 26 Vine St. 

Galloupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

fGaiioupe. Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 
Garrison. William Lloyd Boston 
Goodell. Abner Cheney, Jr. 4 Federal St., Salem 

Goodell, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

Coodridge, Gertrude May 5 Prescott Place 

I Graham, George Herbert 62 Commercial St. 

I 

i 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Graves, Isaiah in Fayette St. 

Green, Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Guilford, Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

Guindon, J. Rodman 51 Grove St. 

Hacker, Sallie H 20 r Ocean St. 

Ham, Abbie M 32 Hamilton Ave. 

Hannan, Joseph F 3 G Rogers Ave. 

Harmon, Maria B. So North Common St. 

Harmon, Rollin E S9 North Common St. 

Harney, William Henry 73 Baker St. 

Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Hart, George D 22 Mall St. 

Hatch, Everett F. . . . 9 S Hanover St. 

Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremout St. 

Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

Heath, Caroline Putnam 132 South Common St. 

Heath, Henry Warren 109 Hollingsworth St. 

Hill, Susan T 14 Summer Place 

Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

Hilton, Eliza A . 16 Henry Ave. 

Hilton, James E 535 Western Ave. 

Mollis, Samuel J 220 Ocean St. 

Hood, Martin Herrick 169 Ocean St. 

Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

Howe, Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

Hudson, Kitty j6 Chatham St. 

Hutchinson, John Wallace John's Ave., High Rock 

Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

Ingalls, Eveline S 43 Whiting St. 

Ingalls, J. Fred 605 Western Ave. 

Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

Ingalls, Jerome . 229 Ocean St. 

Johnson, Andrew Dudley Winter St., East Saugus 

Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St.* 

Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

Johnson, Benjamin Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

Johnson, David N 101 Newhall St. 

Johnson, Elliott Clarke .62 .Mall St. 

Johnson, Elliott Otis 4r Cherry St. 

Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 



1605332 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



03 



Johnson, Henry W 98 Soutli Common St. 

J rhnson, Luther S. . 226 Ocean St. 

Johnson, .Maria L 62 Mall St. 

Johnson, Virginia Vernon 109 Nahant St. 

Kecne. Frank 17 Atlantic St. 

Ken ney, Thomas 41 Collins St. 

Kimball, Rufus . 54 Harwood St. 

Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Lamson, Caleb 124 Green St. 

Leigh ton, Charles 46 Bloomfield St. 

Lewis, Jacob Meek 8 Fayette St. 

.Lummus, William W 31 Franklin St. 

Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

Mansfield, Perley B 19 Nichols St. 

Martin, George Henry 3S8 Summer St. 

Matthews. Harriet L 42 Hanover St. 

Moore, Arthur S didder 54 Mall St. 

Moulton, Daniel B 36 Sagaoiore St. 

Moulton, James T \ . . . . r2 Carn.es St. 

Moulton, Katherine R 71 Federal St. 

Mower, Earl Augustus 5 Smith St. 

Mower, Emma F. Page . . 5 Smith St. 

Mudge. Arthur Bar.tlett 27 Greystone Park 

Mullen, Charles H 17 Portland St. 

Mullin, James D 58 Newhall St. 

Neal, Peter Morrell 1022 Washington St. 

Neal, William E 1022 Washington St. 

Newhall, Asa Tarbell 4S9 Lynn field St. 

Newhall, Bertram B 55 Bnlfinch St. 

Newhall, Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

Newhall, Guy 57 Silsbee Ave. 

Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

Newhall, Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

Newhall, Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

Newhall, James Silver 132 South Common St. 

Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

Newhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

*Newhall, Lucian 2S1 Ocean St. 

Newhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

•Decided; 



36 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Newhall, Marion Wentworth 132 South Common St. 

Newhall, Sarah Effie 19 Park St. 

Newhall. Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantic St. 

Newhall. Terr)- Arden 69 Newhall St. 

Newhall, Wilbur Fisk 74 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

Newhall, William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

Nichols, Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

Nichols. Frank Herbert 7 Prospect St. 

Nichols. Fred Hammond . 10 Prospect St. 

Nichols. Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

Nichols, Thomas Parker * ... n Prospect St. 

Niles, William Henry 64 Atlantic St. 

Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Parsons, Mary A Lynnheld Centre 

Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 

Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Paul, John M 9 Farrar St 

Paul, Lucy F 9 Farrar St. 

Peabody, Dean 12 Park St. 

Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

Perley, Howard 35 Hamilton Ave. 

Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

Pevear, Sarah E 139 Washington St. 

Phillips, Arthur John 35 Bassett St. 

Phillips, Frederick A 97 Henry Ave. 

Pickford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

Pillsbury, James N 28 Sachem St. 

Pinkham, Emily G 64 N ah ant St. 

Plum trier, George H 330 Summer St. 

Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

Prescott, Edward Wentworth 23 Huron St. 

Putnam, Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

Putnam, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

Putnam, Ralph W . 13 Sachem Ave. 

Richards, James H 72 Fayette St. 

Robinson, Charlotte M 43 Sachem St. 

Robinson, John Lewis 43 Sachem St. 

Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 

Rule, Elizabeth E So Franklin St. 

K-u-ss, lv.cz 13 76 Chatham St. 

V isell, Edward M 127 Nahant St. 

Sanderson, Howard Kendal! 646 Western Ave. 

Sargent, William P. 151 Chestnut St. 

Sawyer, Henry j\ 243 Boston St. 

Soars. Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

Sheldon, Ohauncey C. 49 North Common St. 

Sheldon, May L ^9 North Common St. 

H Silsbee, Henry 38 Brookline St. 

Spinney. Benjamin F. 270 Ocean St. 

Spinney. Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

Sprague. Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

Sprague, Henry Breed Walker Road, Swampscott 

Stewart, Samuel Barrett 141 Ocean St. 

Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

Sweetser. Charles S- 103 Franklin St. 

Sweetser, David Herbert 55 Baltimore St. 

Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

Svmonds, Walter E S7 Nahant St. 

1 apley, Amos Preston Boston 

Tapley, Henry Fuller .... 2S0 Ocean St. 

Tapley, Ida J. 2S0 Ocean St. 

Tarbox, James E. . . 102 Federal St. 

Tebbetts, Charles Barker 37 Baltimore St. 

Thompson, Fredd O Elmwood Road, Swampscott 

Thompson, Leon Ernest 40 Woodlawn St. 

Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Nahant St. 

Usher, Edward Preston 23 Court St., Boston 

Van Buren, James Heartt 80 South Common St. 

Waiters, William 26 South Common St. 

Whitman, Joseph Henry 12 Smith St. 

Williams George H. 19 Lyman St. 

Williams, George Hamilton . . .:■.'. . . . Woodland Ave., Swampscott 

Withered, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

Wood, Lana J 19 Franklin St. 

Woodbury, Charles J. H 61 Commercial St. 

Woodbury, John 60 Atlantic Terrace 

Woodbury, John P Boston 



3S 1. V.N.N HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



MEMBERS OF THE VOLUNTARY ASSOCIATION 

Known as the Lynn Historical Society. 
who Died before the Incorporation of the Society. 



Parsons, Charles Edward ic6 Franklin St. 

Rich, George Henry 218 Essex St. 

Breed, James Albert 17 Nahant St. 



MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE COUNCIL SINCE 
INCORPORATION OE THE SOCIETY. 



Jiific 1. tSgj. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

Breed, Emma Hawthorne . . . . ■ 112 Green St. 

'•'• Cochey, Joseph H n Tudor St. 

" Lamper, Sarah E 16 Kind's Beach Terrace 

" McArthur. Annie E 120 South Common St. 

O'Shea, William, 112 Market St. 

Robinson, William Pitt . 1739 17th St., Washington. D.C. 

" Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

Oct. rS, iSqj. Bartlett, Hannah H 115 Nahant St. 

Nov.24.1Bgj. Bliss, George S 24 Chase St. 

" Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

" Stone, Eliza E. 23 Lyman St. 

Dec. 22, iSgy. Emerson, Philip 337 Maple St. 

i; Johnson, Lydia Hacker .... Winter St., East Saugus 

Woodbury, Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

Jan.. 2$, iSgS. Allen, Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

Bartlett, Ella Doak 61 Atlantic St. 

Bartlett, John S ' 61 Atlantic St. 

Hunt D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

(i Lamson, Hannah G 124 Green St. 

Mullin, Sarah Abby 58 Newhail St. 

" Smith., Joseph N. 232 Ocean St. 

Mch.ro, iSgS. Pevear, Mary F. . . 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 



I A* XX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



39 



CM 



ittr.i8.iSg8. Littlefield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

Porter, Bertha Currier 101 Fayette St. 

Porter, Margaret Ellen ;oi Fayette St. 

May 20, i8g8. Emmons, Harriet N 129 Burnll St., Swainpscott 

Graves, Harriet D 16S South Common St. 

Hawkes. Samuel Saugus 

Ingalls, Mary Mower 20 Alice St. 

Lewis, Charles W 140 Lewis St. 

Lummus, Henry Ttlton 4 Hudson St. 

Ruppel, Emil F. .... ... 120 South Common St. 

Ruppel. Myra D. Allen 720 South Common St. 

Stimpson. Isabella Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

Whiton, MaryAshcroft 49 Atlantic Terrace 






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StmfK^poov, FPU 



&.K • 



THE REGISTER 



OF THE 



Lynn Historical Sbcle.lv, 



LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS, 



EOR THE YEAR 1 595. 







^IP^ 



LYNN, MASS. 

THE NICHOLS PRESS — THOS. P. NICHOLS. 
1899. 



G.K 



i 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1899. 



President, 

PHILIP A. CHASE. 

Vice-President, 
BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Treasurer, 

CHARLES F. PEIRCE. 

Recording Secretary, 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL. 

Corresponding Secreta ry, 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Philip A. Chase. George H. Martin. 

William S. Burrill. Charles H. Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. James S. Newhall. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Charles F. Peirce. 

Frank Keene. Henry F. Tapley. 

Rufus Kimball. John Woodbury 

Earl A. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COMMITTEES. 



William S. Burrill. 
Alfred Cross. 
Earl A. Mower. 



Philip A. Chase. 
Charles C. Fry. 
Luther S. Johnson 



Committee on Room. 

Charles H. Newhall. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Arthur J. Phillips. 

Finance. 

Charles F. Peirce. 
Henry B. Sprague. 
David H. Sweetser. 



To Secure Publication of Old Town and City Records. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Samuel A. Guilford. 

Amos F. Breed. Rollin E. Harmon. 

Philip A. Chase. John Woodbury. 

To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens. 

Charles Buffum. Henry W. Johnson. 

S. Oliver Breed. James H. Richards. 

George B. Currier. William P. Sargent. 

Isaac K. Harris. William Stone. 
David N. Johnson. 



Books, Documents and Papers, 



Samuel B. Stewart. 
Charles E. Clark. 
Louise S. Earle. 
Frank Keene. 
Mary F. Little. 
George H. Martin. 



Harriet L. Matthews. 
Elizabeth E. Rule, 
Howard K. Sanderson. 
James H. Van Buren. 
-Charles J. H. Woodbury. 
John P. Woodbury. 



Lectures and Public Meetings. 



Henry F. Tapley. 
William S. Burrill. 
Philip A. Chase. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Micajah P. Clough. 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Charles H. Newhall. 
Howard Mudge Newhall. 
May L. Sheldon. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



John L. Parker. 
Benjamin Hun Berry. 
Joanna A. Bubier. 
Percy Chase. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Susan T. Hill. 
John C. Houghton. 



Genealogy. 

Anna L. Johnson. 
Enoch S. Johnson. 
Henry W. Johnson. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 
Emma F. P. Mower. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
William P. Sargent. 



Increase of Membership and Admission of Members. 

William S. Burrill. Charles H. Newhall. 

M. Adelaide Bubier. Lucy E. B. Newhall. 

S. Arthur Bubier. . John Lewis Robinson. 

William E. Dorman, Ida J. Tapley. 

William E. Neal. Ellen L. Warner. 

Publications and Printing. 



Howard Mudge Newhall. 
Nathan M. Hawk.es. 
James S. Newhall. 



George S. Bliss. 
Edward E. Bacheller. 
Mary G. Brown. 
Charles A. Cross. 
John W. Darcy. 



John Woodbury. 
Emma H. Breed. 
Stephen L. Breed. 
Warren M. Breed. 
Charles Buffum. . 
William Lloyd Garrison 



Henry E. Tapley. 
John G. Warner. 

Photography. 

Charles S. Fuller. 
Katherine R. Moulton. 
Fred H. Nichols. 
Joseph N. Smith. 



Historical Relics. 

Samuel A. Guilford. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Ida J. Tapley. 



Marking Historical Locations. 

Rufus Kimball. Richard J. Nichols, 

Frank L. Earl. John L. Parker. 

Isaac F. Galloupe. James H. Richards. 
Arthur B. Mudge. 



f 

6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Necrology. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Israel A. New hall. 

John C. Houghton. Wilbur F. Newhall. 
Rufus Kimball. 

Compilation of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Israel A. Newhall. 

John C. Houghton. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Mary A. Parsons. 

David N. Johnson. Elizabeth E. Rule. 

George H. Martin. William P. Sargent. 

Harriet L. Matthews. John Woodbury. 

Geology and Botany. 

Jonathan W. Goodell. Mabel Earle. 

Lillie B. Allen. Philip Emerson. 

Walter B. Allen. Martin H. Hood. 

Luther At wood. D. Gage Hunt. 

Charles Neal Barney. Peter M. Neal. 

Frank F. Brigham. Myra D. Allen Ruppel. 

Reception at Public Meetings. 

William S. Burrill. Fred H. Nichols. 

Ella D. Bartlett. Mary F. Peyear. 

Henry W. Breed. Emily G. Pinkham. 
Sallie H. Hacker. May L, Sheldon. 

Caroline P. Heath. Isabelle B. Stimpson. 

Virginia N. Johnson. Walter E. Symonds. 
Emma F. P. Mower. Ida J. Tapley. 

Marion W. Newhall. Jennie R. Woodbury. 

and Members of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



BY-LAWS 



I 

ARTICLE I. 

r 

MEMBERS; 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 

ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second Wednes- 
. day evening in Jamfary, time and place to be determined 
by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. A less number may 
adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direction of 
the Council, or President, and shall be called upon the 
written request of twenty members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 



8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-President, 
Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Treas- 
urer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from the 
members of the Council. They shall perform the usual 
duties of such officers, and such other duties as the Coun- 
cil may require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July first of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording Secretary, 

At the Second Annual Meeting of the Society, at Oxford Club Hall, Wednesday 
Evening-, January n, 1899. 



The second year has shown the good work of the 
formative first year of the Society, and the amount that 
has been accomplished is better realized when taken col- 
lectively than taken separately, as spread over the weeks 
and months of the 3 T ear. There have been two meetings 
of the Society, ten meetings of the Council, a Loan Exhi- 
bition, a Field Day, two afternoon Receptions at the room, 
besides the faithful work of some of the Committees. Of 
two hundred and thirty-live members whose names occurred 
in the annual publication as members of the Society at the 
last Annual Meeting, seven have withdrawn and three, 
Messrs. Lucian New'hall, Charles Smith Sweetser, and 
Charles Otis Beecle, have died, leaving two hundred and 
twenty-five who were members during the first year of the 
Society. During the year thirty-seven new members have 
been elected by the Council, and one of these has with- 
drawn, making the present membership of the Society two 
hundred and sixty-one. 

At the. Annual Meeting, the Committee for Marking 
Historical Locations were given authority to expend not 
exceeding seventy-live dollars in placing appropriately in- 
scribed tablets to mark historical locations or buildings 
which the Committee should select. This Committee has 
placed six durable tablets of monumental bronze with in- 



IO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

scriptions, and repaired the tablet at Applcton's Pulpit, as 
more fully described in the report presented by the Com- 
mittee. The Committee on publications and printing, as 
instructed by the Society, arranged and had published a 
report of the proceedings of the Society for the year 1S97, 
which was sent to the members, to every known historical 
society in the State of Massachusetts, and to public libra- 
ries in the cities of the State. "Many appreciative and 
complimentary acknowledgments were received from those 
to whom they were sent. One of the most faithful of all 
the Committees has been the Committee on Genealogy, 
which has been regularly organized, has held regular 
monthly meetings, and has been laying a good foundation 
for the important work which the Committee is planning 
to do in that interesting department of historical society 
work. The Committee to secure the Publication of Old 
Town and City Records appeared before the Mayor, City 
Clerk, and a City Government Committee, in the early 
part of the year, being accorded a most respectful hearing, 
which resulted in the request from the City Government for 
the appointment from the Historical Society of a member 
who should act with the Mayor and City Clerk in procur- 
ing information in regard to the advisability, and probable 
cost of publication of the records. As the communication 
suggested that Hon. Nathan M. Hawkes would be an ac- 
ceptable commissioner from the Society, he was most heart- 
ily and unanimously chosen by the Council, and the City 
Clerk so notiiied. 

Without in any way detracting from the great amount 
of faithful work of the year by individuals and by Com- 
mittees, probably the work which attracted the most public 
attention, at home and outside our own limits, was that of 
the Loan Exhibition in the Proctor Building, corner of 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 

Exchange and Spring- Streets, continuing for five days and 
evenings, from Monday, April 18, to Friday, April 22. This 
exhibition was suggested, planned, and carried out, by the 
ladies and gentlemen of the Committee on Historical Relics. 
It was attended by a large number of people, increasing 
in numbers as the interest and knowledge of the exhibition 
became known, and was extensively noticed by the local 
and Boston newspapers. Mr. John Woodbury, Chairman 
of the Committee, in the report to the Council, said, "It 
is not for the Committee perhaps to estimate the value and 
effect of the exhibition, nevertheless it is not too much to 
say that experts have assured the Committee that the col- 
lection of relics brought together on this occasion was at 
least equal in interest to other loan exhibitions which have 
recently been held in Massachusetts. Several permanent 
results have been readied. An interest in the Society has 
been created, resulting in the addition of a considerable 
number of members. The exhibition has demonstrated 
that there is the material for a valuable permanent collec- 
tion owned by the citizens of Old Lynn. A certain amount 
of instruction may have been given to the many young 
people whom it was a pleasure to see closely and intelli- 
gently peering into the cases day by day." 

The Committees on Lectures and Public Meetings, on 
Increase of Membership, on Necrology, and in other depart- 
ments, have attended to the work necessary to be done. 

At the Annual Meeting in January, Mr. Henry B. 
Sprague read an interesting paper on the subject of " The 
New Light Movement, and its connection with the riotous 
proceedings at the Quaker Meeting House in Lynn in 1822." 
On December 14th, Hon. Nathan M. Hawkes presented a 
valuable paper on " The Evolution of the Town from the 
Parish." The Hon. Robert S. Rantoul of Salem, President 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

of the Essex Institute, was present at this meeting and 
addressed the Societv. The papers of Mr. Sprague and 
Mr. Hawkes were printed in full in the Daily Evening 
/Ian, and extensively read by the people of Lynn. 

Monday, June 27, was the occasion of a Field Day, 
conveyances being taken on Exchange Street, iate in the 
forenoon, for Saugus. The company visited Round Hill, 
the Cinder Banks, location of the First Iron Works in 
America, the old Iron Works Canal Bed, the Fording Place, 
Appleton's Pulpit, taking a basket lunch at Lily Pond 
Grove. After luncheon, seated under the pines, the mem- 
bers listened to a paper by Charles J. II. Woodbury, Esq., 
on the subject of " The Floating Bridge at Lynn, on the 
Salem and Boston Turnpike/' The paper was followed 
by remarks from Hon. Abner C. Goodell, Jr. The re- 
mainder of the day was spent in visiting the site of the old 
Garrison House, and Indian Rock, returning by way 
of Lynnfield, visiting the Serpentine Mound, so called, 
being an extended ridge of a deposit of rocks and stones, 
now covered with vegetation and trees. The beautiful 
weather contributed in no small degree to the pleasures 
and comforts of the dav. 

The Council and Chairmen of Committees were on 
Friday, October 28th, entertained by Benjamin N. Johnson, 
Esq., Vice President of the Society, at Breakheart Hill 
camp, Oaklandvale. A tally-ho coach, provided by the 
liberal entertainer, conveyed the party for a ride through 
Lynn Woods, and in the evening the route was through 
the valley of the Saugus, a model moonlight ride. The 
collection of local birds and the many articles of historic 
interest at the camp were much enjoyed by the visitors. 

At a meeting of the Council, September 26th, Messrs. 
Philip A. Chase, Charles Buffum, and Martin H. Hood, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



*3 



were appointed as a Committee to appear before the City 

Government asking for a location, on some public ground, 
on which the Historical Society could place an old-fashioned 
shoe-maker's shop, furnished with shoe-makers outfits, as 
a permanent exhibit for the preservation of the style of 
structure from which the great shoe industry of the United 
States took its start. The matter of procuring such a 
building, securing a location, and arrangements for its per- 
manency, was left to this Committee, the same to be done 
without expense to the Society by the generous offer of a 
gentleman who was interested to have such a permanent 
exhibit. A hearing before a Committee of the City Gov- 
ernment took place, but no location has yet been decided 
upon. 

During the year the Society has received gifts of the 
following; articles for its collection : 

From the daughters of the late Henry Breed, a copy of the com- 
plaint made against certain people for disturbing the Quaker 
meeting in JS22. 

From George \V. Flanders, a copy of Essex Journal published 
in 1776; a copy of Post and Advertiser published in 1779. 

From David N. Johnson, a copy of Sketches of Lynn, and a 
bound volume of Boston Sentinel for 18 10. 

From Florimond B. Mower, bound volume of a Boston news- 
paper of 1S05, containing matters of interest concerning 
Lynn. 

From James S. Newhall, representing the estate of Thomas 
B. Newhall, bound volumes of the Boston Atlas and Lynn 
Freeman. 

From James W. Conner, two copies of Ulster County Gazette, 
containing account of the funeral of George Washington. 

From Willie R. Breed, bound volume of newspaper called The 
Awl. 

From John C. Houghton, two volumes of Cooke's Centuries. 



14 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From John P. Woodbury, copy of Wood's New England's Pros- 
pect. 

From Willard C. Chase, old almanac. 

From Melville P. Nickerson, old deeds. 

From Misses M. A. and L. A. Phillips, two old leather fire buckets. 

From Abner C. Goodell Jr., oil painting of Breed's Pond darn ; 
oil painting of Dungeon Rock ; two engraved views of Lynn ; 
four colonial portraits, all mounted and framed. 

From Mayor Walter L. Ramsdell, a Queen Victoria Jubilee 
medal in a case, accompanied by a letter from the Mayor of 
King's Lynn, England. 

From Mrs. Mary Ashcroft Whiton, the black walnut book-case 
of the late E. H. Ashcroft. 

From E. KnOwlton Fogg, a copy of the Bradford History, pub- 
lished by the State of Massachusetts. 

From Richard I. Attwill, bound copies of printed Boston records. 

From Charles BufFum, a picture of the ; * Old Boys of Ward 
Four" at Nahant, framed ; two small pictures, framed. 

From Samuel H. Barnes, an old copy of the Lynn Mirror. 

From Alfred Cross, Continental money; copy of a report of the 
Relief Committee who had charge of the distribution of aid 
to sufferers by the Lynn Conflagration of November 26th, 
1889, signed personally by the members of the Committee. 

From John Lewis Robinson, Boston Almanac for 1S51 and 1S62 ; 
Lynn Directories for 1 85 1 , 1854, 1S67, 1S71, 1S73, 187S, 
1S85, 1SS6, 18S7, 1S8S, 1889,1890, 1S91 ; framed view of 
Lynn from High Rock in 1849 ; framed east and west views 
of Lynn from High Rock in 1S56 ; map of Lynn in 1S29 
from first map of Alonzo Lewis ; photographic view of 
Swampscott in 1S72 ; Market Street in 1S20, framed; old 
house on Market street where now stands Exchange Hall, 
framed ; map of United States in 1850 ; map of Essex County 
in 1S56; map of Lynn in 1S52 ; map of United States in 
1S97 ' diary of Miss Cynthia Pratt, 1S34 to 1842, a resident 
and teacher of a private school in Ward 4 ; sheets of bills, 
receipts, etc., from prominent citizens of Lynn, 1S05 to 1S36; 
hand-bill for a party at the old Town Hall in 1846; shoe- 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



maker's seal and kit on which John Chase, a venerable and 
respected citizen of Ward 4, worked from the age 01*9 to S3, 
a period of 74 years; deed of Sarah Bacheller of Lynn, 
devising personal property, June 30, 17S9 ; warrant of Asses- 
sors of Lynn to James Newhall, Collector for the Methodist 
Society in the First Parish, July 2d, 1799; subscription 
paper to raise funds to buy powder to celebrate American 
Independence, tSio, headed by Lawyer Benjamin Merrill 
who gave £3 ; contract to build a school house in Ward 6, 
between Timothy Munroe and others, 1S10; petition signed 
by 91 prominent citizens of Lynn to the Selectmen, on the 
sale of spirituous liquors, May, 1S17 ; Boston almanac, 1S45 ; 
handbill issued by the Committee of 21 on the eve of the 
election to vote on the City charter, headed " Down with the 
City charter," printed by Lewis Josselyn of the Lynn Bay 
State, April iS, 1S50; history of the building and dedica- 
tion of the City Hall in Lynn, 1S67 ; pamphlet, the Eastern 
Railroad of Massachusetts, its blunders, etc., by Charles W. 
Felt. Salem, 1S74, embracing an account of the erection and 
demolition of the State Street depot under the Presidency of 
John Wooldredge of Lynn, 1S75 ; pictorial history of Lynn, 
10S0; souvenir edition of the Cambridge Chronicle, con- 
taining an account of the reception tendered by the City of 
Cambridge, August 28, to the veterans of the Nineteenth 
Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (Colonel Hincks), in 
which many Lynn members participated, iSSS ; souvenir 
edition of the Boston Daily Traveller, containing account of 
the annual encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic 
in Boston, 1890; Boot and Shoe Weekly, August 3, 1892, 
Shoe and Leather Reporter, August 4, 1S92, Shoe and 
Leather Review, August 6, 1S92, Boot and Shoe Recorder, 
August 10 and 24, 1S92, all four relating to the outing in 
Lynn Woods of the Boston Boot, Shoe and Leather Club. 
From Hon. William M. Olin, Secretary of State, four volumes 
containing list of Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the 
Revolutionary War, and other volumes to be contributed as 
soon as published. 



l6 * LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Rev. James H. Van Birren, complete file of copies of 
iC The Reminder," an annual publication of St. Stephen's 
Church, giving list of societies and officers connected with 
the parish. 

From Oscar F. Ingalls, an old spit, belonging to a tin kitchen. 

From Dr. Charles E. Clark, volumes of Dr. Cheever's Pilgrim 
Fathers ; Essex Memorial by James R. Newhall : Keves of 
Heaven; simple Cobler of Aggawam ; Moll Pitcher ; Cleo- 
patra's Barge ; Massachusetts Society of American Revolu- 
tion. 

From David II. Sweetser, Lynn Directory, 1S51. 

From a friend, an old dictionary, and a pamphlet sermon on 
death of Rev. Abie! Abbott. 

From Charles H. Newhall, a plan of seats in the old Tunnel 
meeting-house, drawn by Alonzo Lewis, and purchased from 
his sons, giving the names of old Lynn families who occu- 
pied the pews. 

From Peter Massey, a shoe-maker's last of early date. 

From F. H. Lee, of Salem, two medals commemorating the 
sixtieth year of Queen Victoria's reign. 

From Charles Parker of Boston, tiles representing the Bulrmch 
front of the State House, and the Hancock House. 

From William H. Frazier, bound volume of the Lynn Transcript 
for 1S72. 

From different Historical Societies, copies of their publications. 

Some of the articles contributed in 1S97, and some 
contributed in 1S9S, have not yet come into the actual 
possession of the Society, but they have all been acknowl- 
edged and placed on record, that they may be identified as 
the property of the Society. In most of the few cases of 
undelivered articles they are subject to the immediate call 
of the Society. 

On Monday, January 2d, 1899, the Committee on Re- 
ception inaugurated a series of Monday afternoon recep- 
tions to be held for the members during the winter season. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 7 



The two that have already been held were well attended, 
and the opening" of the room one afternoon each week has 
been greatly appreciated. 

With increasing public interest in the Society, and with 
dse increasing collection of articles of value to our local 
history, it will no doubt soon be advisable to have some 
stated afternoon each week on which the public can have 
access to the room. During the summer months the Secre- 
tary was called upon by several visitors to the city, who 

. . . . 

requested opportunity to visit and inspect the collection. 

In two instances matters of special family interest to the 
visitors were discovered, and by people also who had never 
I been Lynn residents. 

The results of two years show that there was a large 
place open for such public work as that of the Lynx 
Historical Society. It has been one of the marked 
attempts of recent years to combine in one organization 
the men and women of Lynn to work together for the 
good reputation and standing of this ancient settlement. 
It has met the appreciation of the citizens, and any reason- 
able request which the Society might make in the line of 
public good would, without doubt, meet with hearty and 
universal approval. It remains for the Society to take its 

(own position as a leading factor in the future social and 
intellectual life of the people of Lynn, a position which 
I an approving public is apparently willing to accord to it, 

I and support. 

I 

I ' . 



l8 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



CHARLES F. PEIRCE, Treasurer, 

in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 
f ■ 

Dr. 

1S9S Jan. 13. Balance $359 05 

189S Jan. 13 7 

to > Dues received from members 430 00 

1S99 Jan. 11) 

April 20 to April 29, Loan Exhibition : 

Admissions $112 60 

Tea room 10 50 

Rebate on bills 4 62 

Cash gifts from two members -357 

$151 29 

From other sources . 10 00 

■ $95° 34 

Cr. 

1S98 Jan. 21. Paid Oxford Club for hall $24 00 

Lynn Gas and Electric Co., rent of 

room for one year 200 00 

v - Janitor for care of room 28 50 

Carpenter, labor and material .... 16 20 

Printing Register 137 00 

Printing, circulars, postal cards, and 

for postage 107 27 

Appleton Pulpit, and Bronze Tablets, 

placing and work on same .... 67 00 

Furniture for room 39 80 

Expense of Loan Exhibition .... 151 29 

Sundry minor expenses 10 10 

I Balance in Bank 169 oS 

j $95° 34 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 9 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GENEALOGY. 

1 

I 

1 

The Genealogical Committee organized for work early 
in the year, and would report a fair degree of progress. 
The purpose of the Committee is to lay the foundations of 
a local genealogical collection that shall contain the history 
of all the families of Lynn. To accomplish this end, the 
Committee desires the cooperation of every member of the 
Society, and in the hope of securing it, a circular has been 
mailed to the members and with it two blank forms to be 
filled out with the ancestors, on the father's and mother's 
side, as far back as the knowledge of the descendant ex- 
tends. We have made a good beginning, quite a number 
of completed genealogies being on file. In addition to 
these we have reports from quite a number who are collect- 
ing the information and will in due time add to our treas- 
ures. 

The Committee would acknowledge the receipt of the 
Bancroft genealogy and the "Ancestry of Nathan Dane 
Dodge," from Mrs. M. A. Parsons ; a set of reports of 
R. T. Swan, on the preservation of Town Records, from 
Charles Buff um ; " Samuel Rowell and his Descendants," 



from John L. Parker. 

The Committee has held monthly meetings, and the 
interest of a majority of the members has been marked. 
This branch of historical work is not always accorded the 
attention it deserves, and it is the desire of the Committee 
to arouse an interest in the subject, and impress upon the 
Society the importance of gathering, recording and pre- 



20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

serving a knowledge of the men and women who have 
been, and are, the life of our community. As genealogy 
is the foundation of history, the members of this Society 
can with propriety give the subject their careful attention. 
Jt is the hope of the Committee that during the coming 
year the blanks already distributed will be filled out and 
that all the names connected with the past and present life 
of Lynn may be traced, at least to their emigrant ancestry, 
and have a permanent place in the archives of our Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John L. Parker, 

Chairman. 
Lynn, January g. iSgg. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE FOR MARKING 
HISTORICAL LOCATIONS. 



Tablets have been placed on the following places with 
the following inscriptions : 



(Saugus, n ear Scoffs Mills) 



THE FIRST IRON WORKS. 

THE FIRST SUCCESSFUL IRON WORKS 
IN THE COUNTRY ESTABLISHED HERE. 

FOUNDRY ERECTED IN 1643. JOSEPH 
JENKS BUILT A FORGE HERE IN 1647 , 

AND IN 1652 MADE THE DIES FOR 

THE FIRST SILVER MONEY COINED IN 

NEW ENGLAND. IN 1654, HE MADE THE 

FIRST FIRE ENGINE IN AMERICA. 



{City Hall Grounds) 



ON THIS SPOT STOOD THE 
ANCIENT BUILDING KNOWN AS 
THE 'OLD TAVERN' 1 BUILT - 
ABOUT THE YEAR 1675. 



{Market Square, opposite Old Lynn Hotel) 



"THE OLD BURIAL GROUND.' 

THE FIRST BURIAL IN THIS 

GROUND TOOK PLACE IN 1637 

THE REMAINS INTERRED WERE 

THOSE OF JOHN BANCROFT, 

ANCESTOR OF GEORGE BANCROFT, 

THE HISTORIAN. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



{Marioit Street) 



" BILLY GRAY HOUSE." 

THE BIRTH-PLACE OF LIEUT. GOV. 
WILLIAM GRAY, GRANDFATHER OF 
JUDGE HORACE GRAY O^ THE U. S. 
SUPREME COURT. ALSO, THE RESI- 
DENCE OF DR. JOHN FLAGG. AN 
ARDENT REVOLUTIONARY PATRIOT. 
CHOSEN A MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE 
OF SAFETY IN 1775, AND RECEIVED A 
COMMISSION AS COLONEL. 



(Boston Street.) 



" RAND HOUSE." 

BUILT IN 1735. ONE OF THE 

CHAMBERS, CALLED MASSEY'S 

HALL, WAS THE FIRST PUBLIC 

HALL IN THE TOWN. AND USED 

FOR SOME OF THE FIRST 

MEETINGS OF THE FREE MASONS. 



(Mower Building, Blake Street.) 



THE GRE 


AT 


LYNN 


FIRE 


0^ NOVE 


MBER 26th 


1839 


BEGAN 


N THE 




BUILDING 


ON 


THIS 


SITE. 



At the bottom of each tablet : 

" Erected by the Lynx Historical Society, 1898." 



Also repairs made on the tablet on Appleton Pulpit in 
Saugtis. The tablets are made of white bronze, backed 
by wood, and bolted to the buildings or posts, and bolted 
to stakes driven into the ground. 



I 



LY.W HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 

The cost of above : 

Repairs on Appleton Pulpit $5 00 

c, Tablets 8x12 at SS.00 40 00 

1 Tablet 12 x iS • 12 00 

Labor and material for placing in position .• • • IO °° 

Total expense $67 co 

Balance of appropriation unexpended 8 00 

Appropriation $75 00 

Rufus Kimball. 
F. L. Earl, 
A. B. Mudge. 
Jo fix L. Parker. 
I. F. Galloupe. 
R. J. Nichols. 
James H. Richards. 

Committee. 



2.[ LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY. 



LUCIAN XEWHALL. 

Lucian Newhall was the son of Pan! and Mar}" 
(Mudge) Newhall, and was born in Lynn, October 14, 1824. 
He was a member of an old and prominent Lynn family, 
and on the paternal side a descendant in the seventh gen- 
eration of Thomas Newhall, the first white child born in 
Lynn; and from Anthony Newhall on the maternal side. 
Mr. Newhall was educated in the public schools of Lynn, 
and graduated at the age of sixteen from the old Lynn Acad- 
emy. He entered the shoe manufactory of his father, and 
having become thoroughly acquainted with the details of 
the shoe trade, in 1847 went into business for himself, 
locating one of the first factories in what is now the cen- 
tral portion of tine city. He retired in 1875, having amassed 
an ample fortune, and devoted himself to the care of his 
real estate, of v v r hich he was a large holder. 

In April, 1897, he was appointed by Mayor Harwood 
a member of the Board of Park Commissioners, in which 
he proved himself a most active and efficient officer. He 
was reappointed by Mayor Ramsdell, and held the posi- 
tion until his death, which occurred May 17, 1S98, at the 
age of 73 years and 7 months. His life was a busy one, 
and he seemed as active in his later years as ever. He 
was one of Lynn's best known and highly esteemed busi- 
ness men. Mr. Newhall was one of the Board of Mana- 
gers of the Lynn Hospital, trustee of the Lynn Institution 
for Savings, director of the Lvnn Gas and Electric Com- 



-/'*. 



LUC1AN NEW HALL. 



I ' '-■•=-- .. - >■ 



CHARLES SMITH SV/EETSER, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



-;> 






pany, member of the Lynn Board of Trade, Lynn Histor- 
ical Society and Oxford Club, and took a great interest in 
the Associated Charities. He was an attendant at the 
Unitarian Church. Mr. Newhall was twice married. His 
first wife was Mrs. Esther Nichols, daughter of Robert and 
Fannie (Briggs) Oliver of Maiden. His second wife was 
Emma Dow Ireson, daughter of Benjamin and Harriet 
(Choate) Ireson of Lynn, by whom he had one child, a 
daughter, Margery Choate, who with her mother survives 
him. 






k 



CHARLES SMITH SWEETSER, 

Who died in Lynn, August 2, 189S, of heart failure, was 
born here May 19, 1844. He was the son of David Smith 
Sweetser and Peace Buffum (Alley) Sweetser. Both 
parents were of early colonial stock. His father was 
descended from Seth Sweetser, born in Tring, England, 
1606, came to Charlestown, Mass., 1635. From Seth the 
line was Benjamin 2 , Samuel 3 , Michael 4 , of Reading ; 
William 5 , of (Saugus) Lynn; Ephraim 6 , David Smith 7 . 
His maternal line was from Hugh Alley, who came to 
Lynn in 1635 ; Hugh 2 , Benjamin 3 , John 4 , John 5 , Peace 
Buffum 6 . 

Mr. Sweetser was not a rover for he was born in the 
house in which he died, and with the exception of a single 
year before his majority, when he was in business in the 
West, he lived in Lynn, and during ail his active years 
was engaged in the shoe business, from which he retired 
with a competencv two vears before his death. 

To illustrate his systematic style of business it may be 
related that when Charles Stewart Parnell, the Irish 
Parliamentary leader, was in Lynn in 1880, Mr. Sweet- 
ser's was selected as the model factory to exhibit the staple 



26 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

industry of the place. Mr. Parnell, under escort of Mr. 
Sweetser and Mayor Sanderson, saw all the processes of 
making, and he saw the Mayor of the City stitch on the 
McKay Machine the pair of shoes (which was presented 
to him), all done in the then unprecedented time of forty- 
five minutes from the moment he had seen the stock cut. 

Mr. Sweetser was a brilliant conversationalist, in which 
faculty he reminded one of Dr. Johnson, whose style as 
Boswell records was terse, robust and felicitous in the high- 
est degree. Dr. Johnson himself said of some of his 
quiet resorts, " There I have free conversation and an 
interchange of discourse with those whom I most love; I 
dogmatize and am contradicted, and in this conflict of 
opinions and opinions I delight." How truly this describes 
what our friend might have said many of us know. 

The currents of Puritan blood flowed through the 
generations from Seth Sweetser and. Hugh Alley till they 
united in Charles S. Sweetser. He was just as much a 
Puritan as they, with this difference, they were 17th cen- 
tury Puritans, he was a 19th century Puritan. They led 
pure lives and had advanced to independence of King or 
Bishop. He led a pure life and with a philosophic mind 
worked out for himself the problems of life as they met him. 

While he contributed liberally to public charities he, 
more than most men, and more than any man we know, 
heeded the injunction, " When thou doest alms let not thy 
left hand know what thy right hand doeth." He never 
married, and resolutely shunned public office, though 
keenly appreciative of the duties of good citizenship. 
He was not affiliated with any fraternal order but was a 
member of the leading social clubs, a member of the Lynn 
Hospital Corporation, and an original member of this 
Society, in the work of which he, as a loyal son of the 
old town, was deeply interested. 



s 



£ 



f$ "V" 



Charles Otis Beede. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 27 

CHARLES OTIS BEEDE 

Was born in Lynn, Mass., December 29, 1840, and died 
in the city of his birth, August 27, 1898. With the ex- 
ception of six years of his boyhood he passed his entire 
life, in this city. He was a successful shoe manufacturer, 
a merchant and real estate dealer at different periods of 

1 his life. On December 22. 1864, he married Miss Irene 

1 _ ■■.■'' 

S. Rich, who survives him. Two children, Lizzie L. and 
George W., are living in Lynn at the present time, but 
their youngest child, Arthur C, died November 17, 1S75, 
in early childhood. Daring the revival in the pastorate of 
Rev, David II. Ela at the First Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Mr. Beede and his young wife were converted, and. on 
October 1, 187 1, they united with the Church of their 
choice. The strong business qualifications of this Christian 
young man were recognized, and he was elected to the 
Board of Trustees of this Church immediately, and he 
held this honored position the remainder of his life, a 
period of more than a quarter of a century. In point of 
service he was the senior member of the Board of Trus- 
tees at the time of his death. 

He served as Alderman of Lvnn during; the years of 
188 1 and 1882, and at the time of his decease he was com- 
pleting his third year of service on the Water Board of 
the city. He was also a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature in the years of 1897 and 1898. He was active 
in Masonic organizations, being a member of Mt. Carmel 
Lodge, Sutton Royal Arch Chapter, and Olivet Com- 
mandery, K.T. Charles O. Beede was a man of integrity. 
He lived a Christian life in his home, in his place of 
business, at City Hall and in the House of Representatives. 

His discriminating mind enabled him to fully understand 

m & • • 

c, 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

all legislation proposed, and he cordially supported every 
measure which he saw to be for the interests oi the people, 
while he strongly opposed anything- and everything tainted 
with dishonor or which seemed to favor the few at the 
expense of the manv. He was a great-hearted man. He 
was a model humanitarian. His employees respected him. 
His benevolences were judicious, numerous, but largely 
secret; his sympathies were genuine, sincere and tender; 
his life was a credit to the Church, an honor to the city, a 
precious legacy to his family. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 29 



MEMBERS. 



April 27, 1897. Abbott, Waldo Lovejoy 15 Prescott Place 

i( Aborn, Charles Henry 297 Summer St. 

Jan. 28,1898. Allen, Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Allen, Walter B 2 Walclen St. 

" Attwill. Alfred Mudge 52 Broad St. 

" Alwood, Luther 8 Sagamore St. 



i; Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Sept. g. jSqS. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2743 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

April 27. 1897. Baker. Frederick E 1S9 Lewis St. 

MarchiS. iSgg. Baker, Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St. 

" Baker, Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S97. Barnes, Wilfred 53 Mall St. 

'• Barney. Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

" Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

" Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Jan.2S.18g8. Bartlett, Ella Doak 61 Atlantic St. 

Oct. /<?, i8gf. Bartlett, Hannah H 115 Nahant St. 

Jan.28.rSg8. Bartlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 27, iSgg. Bazzoni, Mary A 2S Elsmere Place 

June 1. i8g7. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. *Beede. Charles O lis 25 Hamilton Ave. 

" . Bennett Josiah Chase 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

" Bennett, Larkin Everett 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Jan. 27, i8gg. Berry, Benjamin Hun 238 Ocean St. 

* -\'o7>. 24. i8g7. Bliss. George S .... 24 Chase St. 

Oct, 28, 1898. Blood. Eldredge H 157 Maple St. 

April 27, 1897. Breed, Amos Franklin 19 Union St. 

June /, iSg7. Breed, Emma Hawthorne 112 Green St. 

April 27,1897. Breed, George -Herbert . 24 Wave St. 

Breed, Henry W 48 Nahant St. 

" Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Nahant St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Breed, Mary E 47 Commercial St, 

April 27. 1897. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

'■ Breed, Stephen Lovejoy 15 Newhall St. 

" Breed, Warren Mudge 31 Tudor St. 



30 LY.XN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

March /S t 1899. Bresnahan, Maurice V 128 Chestnut St. 

April 2-. /Sgj. Brig-ham, Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

" Brown, Joseph Goold 83 Green St. 

" Brown. Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

" Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Bubier, Harriott Mudge 1S5 Franklin St. 

April 27, iSq-j. Bubier, Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 

'• Bubier, Mary Adelaide 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Mary A 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Nathan G Swampscott 

" Bubier. Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Sylvester H., 2d 172 Washington St. 

" Buff urn, Charles 450 Union St. 

March 18, iSgg. Buker, Frank Emery 144 Franklin St. 

April 2?, r8g 7 . Bui finch, Charles F. . 184 Lewis St. 

" Burrill, Abby M 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill. John Irving .'..... 49 Green St. 

" Burrill. William A 44 Hanover St. 

'" Burrill William Stocker 23 Nahant Place 

" Carleton, Joseph. G. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

Feb. g, 1899. Chace, Maria Rachel 185 Franklin St. 

April 2/, 1897. Chadwell, George H 192 South Common St. 

" Chase, Percy Brookline, Mass. 

" Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

t{ Clark, Charles Edward S9 Broad St. 

" Clough, Charles Bartlett 39 Cherry St. 

" dough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 

" Clough, Micajah Pratt 253 Ocean St. 

June 1,1897. Cochey, Joseph H 11 Tudor St. 

April 27, iSgj. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 

" Cross, Charles A S Chase St. 

" *Currier, George Burrill 10 r Fayette St. 

" Darcy, John W 54 Commercial St. 

" Dorman, Wiliiam E 157 Ocean St. 

Dec. 24, i8g8. Dow, Charles L 265 Boston St. 

March 18,1899. Dunn, Anna Witherell 22 Portland St. 

Feb. 9, iSgg. Dwyer, Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

April 27, iSgj. Earl, Frank L. Elmwood Road, Swampscott 

" Earle, Anthony 4 Henry Place 

*Earle, Julia A 4 Henry Place 

" Earle, Louise Snow 4 Henry Place 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 3 1 

M.archiSyiSgq, Earle. Mabel 4 Henry Place 

Dec. 22, iSqy. Emerson, Philip 337 Maple St. 

May 20, iSgS. Emmons, Harriet N 129 Burrill St., Swampscott 

April '^27, 1897. Faulkner, Waiter 33 Endicott St. 

'■ Flanders, George W 109 Newhall St. 

" Fogg. Ebenezer Knowlton 23 Lincoln St. 

" Frothinghain, William A 98 South St. 

" Fry, Charles Coffin nr Laighton St. 

" Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

" Fuller, Charles Sylvester . . . . " 26 Vine St. 

" Gil-loupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

" Gailoupe, Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 

" Garrison, William Lloyd Boston 

" Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St., Salem. 

" Goodell, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

" Goodridge, Gertrude May 5 Prescott Place 

Dec. 24, iSgS. Gove, William H 254 LaFayette St., Salem 

April 27, 1897. Graham. George Herbert 62 Commercial St. 

May 20. iSgS. Graves Harriet D 16S South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Graves, Isaiah in Fayette St. 

" Green, Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

" Guilford, Samuel A. ...'.. 30 Bedford St. 

" Guindon, J. Rodman 51 Grove St. 

" Hacker, Sallie PI 201 Ocean St. 

April 7, iSgg. Halliday, Marion 35 King's Beach Terrace 

April 27, 1^97. Ham, Abbie M 32 Hamilton Ave. 

" Hannan, Joseph F 36 Rogers Ave. 

" Harmon, Maria B. 89 North Common St. 

" Harmon, Rollin E 89 North Common St. 

" Harney, William Henry 73 Baker St. 

" Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Hart, George D ■ 22 Mall St. 

" Itawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremont St. 

May 20, 18 gS. Plawkes, Samuel Saugus 

April 27, 1897. Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

" Pleath, Caroline Putnam .... 132 South Common St. 

" Heath, Henry Warren ....'.. 109 Hollingsworth St. 

March 18, i8go. Herbert, George C. . 17 Chatham St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Hill, Alfred C. East Saugus 

April 27, 1897. Hill, Susan T 14 Summer Place 

" Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 



32 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27 y 189-7, Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 

" Hilton, James E 535 Western .Ave. 

April 27. iSgg. Hitchlrigs, James W ' 41 Wave St. 

April 27, 1897- Hollis, Samuel J 220 Ocean St. 

Jan.27.1Sgg. Holmes, ".Lucy T 67 North Common St. 

April 7. iSgg, Hood. A. Amelia Castle Road, Nahant 

April 27^1897. -Hood, Martin Merrick ... 169 Ocean St. 

" Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

" Howe, Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

Oct. 28, iSgS. Hudson, John E 334 Marlborough St., Boston 

April 27, 1897. Hudson, Kitty 76 Chatham St. 

April 27, iSgg. Huntington, Alice B 1S1 Allen Ave. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Hunt,; D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

April 27, 1897. Hutchinson, John Wallace . . . John's Ave., High Rock 

Dec 14, 1898. Ingalls, Edwin W 9 S Laighton St. 

April 27, iSg7. Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

" Ingalls, J. Fred 605 Western Ave. 

" Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome . 229 Ocean St. 

May 20, 1898. Ingalls. Mary Mower 20 Alice St. 

April 7, 1899. Ireson, Samuel S . 170 South Common St. 

Nov. 24, 1S97. Johnson, Addie I 4 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Andrew Dudley . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

" Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus , . 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

" Johnson, David N 10 r Newhall St. 

' ; Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 

" Johnson. Elliott Otis 41 Cherry St. 

April 7, 1899. Johnson, Emma Burt 101 Newhall St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Henry W 9S South Common St. 

April 7, /Sgg, Johnson, Liz, ie Bishop ..... 1S1 North Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Luther S 226 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22. 1897. Johnson, Lydia Hacker .... Winter St., East Saugus 

April 7, 1&99. Johnson, Mary May 226 Ocean St. 

April 27, iSg7. Johnson, Virginia Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

" Keene, Frank 17 Atlantic St. 

March 18. 1809. Keith, Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1897. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

" Kimball, Rufus . . . 54 Harwood St. 

" Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hilt Ave. 



f 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 33 

June /, iSg--. Lamper, Sarah E 16 King's Beach Terrace 

April J27, iSgy. Leigh-ton, Charles \6 Bloomfield St. 

A fay 20, zSgS. Lewis, Charles W 140 Lewis St. 

April 2j, iSgy. Lewis. Jacob Meek 8 Fayette St. 

Jan. 27, r8gg. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

kC Little, William B 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

April 7, i8gg, Littlefi'eld, "Horatia A 35 Franklin St. 

April jSyiSgS. LittleEeld, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

April 7, iSgg. Littlefield, William Bradbury 35 Franklin St. 

May 20. iSgS. Lurnmus, Henry Tilton 4 Fludson St- 

April 27, iSgy. Lurnmus, William W 31 Franklin St. 

" Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

Mansfield, Periey B 19 Nichols St. 

" Martin, George Henry 38S Summer St. 

Jan. 27, iSgg. Martin. James P 24 Sachem St. 

April 27, iSgy. Matthews, Harriet L 42 Hanover St. 

June 1. iSgy. McArthur, Annie E 120 South Common St. 

April 27, iSg7. Moore, Arthur Scudder 54 Mall St. 

'■ Moulton, Daniel B . .... 36 Sagamore St. 

" Moulton, James T 12 Carnes St. 

'• . Moulton, Katherine R. ......... 71 Federal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

" Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St.. Swampscott 

" Mudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 Greystone Park 

Mullen, Charles H 17 Portland St. 

" Muffin James D 58 Newhall St. 

Jan. 2S, 189S. Mullin, Sarah Abby 58 Newhall St. 



April 27, /Sg7- Neal, Peter Morrell 1022 Washington St. 

" Neal. William E. 1022 Washington St. 

" Newhall, Asa Tarbell 4S9 Lynnneid St. 

" Newhall, Bertram B 55 Bultinch St. 

<; Newhall, Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

V Newhall, Guy 57 Silsbee Ave. 

" Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

" Newhall, Howard Mudge 5 Pre'scott Place 

" Newhali, Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, James Silver 132 South Common St. 

" Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

" *Newhall, Lucian 281 Ocean St. 

Newhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, Marion Wentworth . . 132 South Common St. 



34 LYN3S* HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Jan. ii, iS.?g. Newhall, Mary Elizabeth 69 Newhall St. 

April 27, iSgy. Newhall,. Sarah Effie 19 Park St. 

" Newhall. Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall, Terry Arden *. 69 Newhall. St. 

" Newhall, Wilbur Fisk . . 74 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

" Newhall, William Oliver . 52 Atlantic St. 

" Nichols. Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

" Nichols, Frank Herbert 7 Prospect St. 

" Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7, i$og. Nichols, Fred M . . 15 Essex Court 

April 27, 1S97. Nichols, Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

" Nichols, Thomas Parker 11 Prospect St. 

Dec.24, i8g8. Northrup. Arthur J 20 Baker St. 

' ; Northrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

April7,i8gg. Noyes, Mary A ". . . 235 Summer St. 

April 27, 1S07. Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

June r, 1SQ7. O'Shea, W T illiam 112 Market St. 

April 27, 1897, Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. 11, iSgg. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 

" Parsons, Katharine M 106 Franklin St. 

April 27, jSgy. Parsons, Mary A Lyrmfield Centre 

" Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 

" Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

" Paul, John M 9 Farrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F 9 'Farrar St. 

" Peabody, Dean .....' . 12 Park St. 

" Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

" *Perley. Howard 35 Hamilton Ave. 

£i Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

March 10, iSgS. Pevear, Mary F 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

April 27. iSg7- Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washington St. 

Dec. 24. iSgS. Pevear, Waldo L 87 Beacon Flill Ave. 

Feb. g, iSgg. Phillips, Anna Racilha . . 2>5 Bassett St. 

April 27, iSgy. Phillips, Arthur John . 35 Bassett St. 

" Phillips, Frederick A 97 Henry Ave. 

Jan. 27, iSgg. Phillips. Sarah E 21 Lewis St. 

April 27, iSgy. Pickford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

" Pillsbury, James N 28 Sachem St. 

" Pinkham, Emily G 64 Nahant St. 

" Piummer, George FI 330 Summer St. 

April iS, iSgS. Porter. Bertha Currier ici Fayette St. 

" Porter, Margaret Ellen joi Fayette St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 35 

April 27+ -1897. Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

Prescott, Edward Wentworth 23 Huron St. 

April 7, 1899. Prichard, Charles F 17 Sagamore St. 

April 27, 1897. Putnam. Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

" Putnam, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

" Putnam, Ralph VV 13 Sachem Ave. 



" Richards. James H 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Robinson. Elizabeth F 47 Commercial St. 

April 27, 1897. *Robinson, John Lewis 43 Sachem St. 

June j, 1S97, Robinson. William Pitt . 1739 17th St., Washington. D.C. 
April 27, 1897. Rogers, Hamilton Everett . » 30 King St. 

; ' Rogers, Henry Warren . . .' 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

Rule, Elizabeth E So Franklin St. 



May '20 , 1898. Ruppel, Emil F 120 South Common St. 

Ruppei, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Russ, Inez B 76 Chatham St. 

'• Russell, Edward M. 127 Nahant St. 



;i Sanderson, Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

' : Sargent, William P 151 Chestnut St. 

" Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 

" Sears, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

" Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 North Common St. 

" Sheldon, May L 49 North Common St. 

" Silsbee, Henry 3S Brookline St. 

Jan. 2S, 1898. Smith, Joseph N. . 232 Ocean St. 

Scpf. 9, 1898. Smith, Sarah F 232 Ocean St. 

April 27, 181,7. Spinney, Benjamin F 270 Ocean St. 

" Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

Sprague, Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

11 Sprague. Henry Breed . . . Walker Road. Swampscott 

April 7, 1S99.. Stetson, Helen Castle Road. Nahant 

April 27, iSqj. Stewart, Samuel Barrett 141 Ocean St. 

May 20, 1S9S. Stirnpson, Isabelie Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

Apv.24,1897. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

April 27, 1897. Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

" *Sweetser, Charles S 103 Franklin St. 

.," Sweetser, David Herbert 55 Baltimore St. 

" Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

Symonds, Walter E 57 Nahant St. 



36 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27. 1897, Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

" Tapley, Henry Fuller 280 Ocean St. 

Tapley, Ida J. 280 Ocean St. 

" Tarbox, James E 10? Federal St. 

" Tebbetts, Charles Barker 37 Baltimore St. 

" Thompson, Fredd O. . . . Elmwood Road, Swampscott 
" Thompson, Leon Ernest 40 Woodlawn St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Tillman, Hannah Dixon 174 Broadway 

June 1, iSgy. Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

April '27, iSgy. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Nahant St. 

" Usher, Edward Preston . 23 Court St., Boston 

" Van Buren. James Heartt .... 80 South Common St. 

Jan. 11, iS'gg. Warner, Ellen L . 17 Baltimore St. 

;: Warner, John G - 17 Baltimore St. 

April 27, iSgy. Walters, William 26 South Common St. 

" Whitman, Joseph Henry 12 Smith St. 

May 20, iSgS. Whiton, Mary Ashcroft . . Chatsworth Flail, Ocean St. 
April 27, i8gf. Williams, George Hamilton, Woodland Ave., Swampscott 

" Witherell, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

" Wood, Lana J 19 Franklin St. 

" Woddbury, Charles J. H. 61 Commercial St. 

Dec. 22, 1S97. Woodbury, Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

April 2j, iSgj. Woodbury, John 60 Atlantic Terrace 

' : Woodbury, John P Boston 

♦Deceased. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 



THE EVOLUTION OF THE TOWN FROM THE PARISH. 

Being a paper prepared by Hon. Nathax Mortimer Hawkes, and read at a meet- 
ing' of the Society held on Wednesday evening, December 14, r&jS. 



In the first edition of '"'Lewis' History of Lynn" in the 
annals under date 1805, "Mr. Lewis wrote: 

" For one hundred and seventy-three years, from the building 
of the first parish meeting-house, the people had annually assem- 
bled in it, for the transaction of their municipal concerns. But 
this year, the members of that parish observing the damage which 
such meetings occasioned to the house, and believing that, since 
the incorporation of other parishes, the town had no title in it, 
refused to have it occupied as a town-house. This refusal occa- 
sioned much controversy between the town and parish, and com- 
mittees were appointed by both parties to accomplish an adjust- 
ment. An engagement was partially made for the occupation of 
the house, on the payment of twenty-eight dollars annually ; but 
the town refused to sanction the agreement, and the meetings 
were removed to the Methodist meeting-house, on the eastern part 
H of the common." 

I 

This statement unabridged and unenlarged upon stands in 
each subsequent edition ot Lewis and of Newhall. 

If the records of the Parish and Town had been written out 
fully, there would have been much of historical interest in what 
might have been the dramatic ending of the Puritan problem of 
2. union of Church and State, Parish and Town, in Lynn. 

To attempt to relate the story of how the modern Lynn with 
its plethora of religious sects was evolved from a Puritan Parish 
would be too much of a tax upon your patience for an evening's 
talk. 

One of the peculiarities of Lynn is the fact that two men, 
Mr. Lewis and Mr. Newhall, who have done so much to elucidate 



3§ LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

our history, were not in touch with th.it amazing religious refor- 
mation which created the short-lived Commonwealth of England 
and the enduring Commonwealth of Massachusetts. While each 
was loyal to his native Town, each was proud of his connection 
with the Church, the protesting against conformity with which was 
the moving cause of the settling of Massachusetts. If our histo- 
j ^ rian had been a Congregationalism either Unitarian or Trinitarian, 

he would have found a theme of interest in tracing the sequence of 
events which led to this controversy. 

The theory of the Puritan planters was that the fee of all 
lands was in the Company and that grants for plantations were 
made for the settlement of a Parish and incidentally for the civil 
concerns of such Parish. A prime concern of the Parish and its 
creature the Town, was the support of the ministry. Hence the 
Town in granting to individuals made it a condition that all the 
land should bear its share in the common burdens of the Town, 
an important item of which was the ministry. 

Rev. Dr. Parsons Cooke, Lynn's most profound student of 
and brilliant writer upon the early days says : 

"This was the obligation which lay upon the land, a reserve 
tacitly made in the original grant, and which could not be nullified 
in pas.sing from one owner to another. It was a condition in 
the deed which bound and attached it to the titles of all future 
owners." 

The Puritan plan of carrying on all affairs ecclesiastical and 
civic in the Parish seems to have worked without friction in Lynn 
until the Colonial Charter was abrogated and the usurpation of 
Sir Edmund Andros had been ended and the Provincial Charter 
was in full force. For nearly a hundred years the Puritan Theo- 
I cracy had dominated New England. Great changes took place in 

the era of the Provincial Charter and of the Royal Governors. 

The Tunnel meeting-house had been built by assessment 
upon all the acres of the whole Town in 1682. 

In spite of the locating of new Parishes and the setting up 
of rival denominations, the meeting-house of the First Parish was 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 39 

the place of meeting for all purposes of the Town, for one hun- 
dred and seventv-three years, as Mr. Lewis recorded. 
1 The first break in the Parish was a legitimate one even from 

the Puritan standpoint. It was a long distance for the farmers of 
Lynn End or Lynnheld to travel to worship on Lynn .Common, in 
the short winter days when they frequently had -more severe snow- 
storms than we had upon the last night of January of the present 

Recognizing this stumbling block in the way of proper ob- 
servance of the Lord's day, the Town voted Nov. 17, 17 12 : 

i : 

i 

I 

1 



" In answer to the petition of our neighbors, the farmers, so 
called, dated Feb. 13, 171 1, desiring to be a precinct, that all the 
part of the town that lies on the northerly side of that highway that 
leads from Salem to Reading be set off for a precinct, and when they 
shall have a meeting-house and a minister, qualified according to 
law, settled to preach the word of God amongst them, then they 
shall be wholly freed from paying to the ministry of the Town and 
not before. And if afterwards they shall cease to maintain a 
minister amongst them then to pay to the minister of the Town as 
heretofore." 



The conditions of the above vote were complied with, and 
in 1720 Lynnfield became a Precinct and the Second Parish of 
Lynn, and exempt from paying to the ministry of the Town. 

The first alien denomination to set up a meeting was in the 
troubled time of Andros. On the 18th of 5th month 1689, the 
Friends held their first monthly meeting at Lynn. They had pre- 
viously, in 1678, erected a meeting-house on Wolf Hill on what is 
now Broad Street, upon the land still owned by the Society. 

The incursion of the Quakers was the first serious menace of 
the Puritan domination and the most serious till the advent of 
Methodism a century later. Of the good sense of the Parish in 
this matter Dr. Cooke says : " The friction engendered by the 
requirement that all the colonists should be taxed to support the 
ministry, was one of the greatest sources of disaster to the Puritan 
cause.''' But the parish in Lynn took early measures to mitigate 



40 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

the evils of this law, and so far to relax its force as to maintain 
good neighborhood with the Quakers. In the year 1722 they 
voted : 

,; The Parish considering that sundry of our neighbors called 
Quakers, who have in times past requested to be dismissed from 
paying taxes to our minister, Rev. Nathaniel Henchman, which in 
some respects hath been granted, — but now our Parish observing 
said Quakers frequently purchasing lands, that have usually paid 
to the support of our minister in times past, and under like obli- 
gation with our other lands to pay to the maintenance of our 
minister, — wherefore, voted, that all the lands belonging; to said 
Parish, purchased by said Quakers (not meaning one of another) 
since the settlement of our present minister, as also all other rata- 
ble lands, in whose hands soever, shall for the future pay to said 
Parish, excepting only such lands and estates of the several 
Quakers hereafter named, now freed from paying to the Parish 
the present year, and the same to be at the discretion of the 
Parish, from year to year, whether to pay or not." 

Then follows a list of fifteen persons that were exempt. 
Similar votes, exempting individuals in about the same number, 
were passed from year to year, for several years. From this it 
seems that it had been the custom before this to exempt individu- 
als to some extent. The Society of Friends, considering its antag- 
onistic origin, has little to complain of Puritan intolerance in Lynn. 

The Friends were thrifty and were adroit manipulators of men. 
They not only secured an exemption of their lands from contribu- 
tion towards support of the ministry, but they exhibited a juggling 
feat with the schools such as no other society here ever approached. 

Wherever in this country the Roman Catholics have asked 
for a division of school funds, the Protestants have with one ac- 
cord sounded the tocsin of alarm. 

The early Friends in the reign of Charles the Second, through 
the friendship between James, Duke of York, and William Penn, 
had a suspiciously close bond of union with the Catholics in their 
common dislike of Puritanism. Both Friends and Roman Catho- 
lics have always professed a strong desire for a guarded religious 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 4 1 

training for the young of their sects. Later developments reveal 
how in the fullness of time this scheme worked in Lynn. 

In a paper on the Origin of Quakerism prepared by Samuel 
Bovce it is related : 

i 

"In 17S4, application was made to the selectmen of Lynn 
for the proportion of the money which Friends were annually 
paying for the support of the public schools to be refunded to 
them, in order that it might be used towards defraying the ex- 
penses of their own school. Objections were at first made to this 
request but after some time had elapsed, Friends were allowed to 
draw back annually a portion of this money for that purpose. 
The school was continued about forty years,, and this privilege was 



granted them most of the time." 

Not only were the Friends allowed their proportion of the 
school fund, but they were (as a Society) permitted to choose 
members of the School Committee, and were wherever they lived 
a Ward of the Town. 

Thus was established a full-fledged and original parochial 
school on the soil of Puritan Lynn. 

The Methodists attempted the same project, but in town 
meeting, Feb, 23, 1792, it was voted " That the Methodists do not 
draw their part of the school money back." 

In 182 1 the Friends' parochial school was done away with by 
a vote " That the Town be redistricted anew r , as it respects the 
several schools without any regard to any particular religious 
society." 

It was not till the close of Rev. Jeremiah Shepard's happy 
and united pastorate of forty-one years that the First Parish and 
the people of Lynn realized that the golden age of the Puritan 
Theocracy had passed — that the ecclesiastical and civil concerns 
of the whole people were not within the scope of the First Parish. 

Lynnfield had become an independent parish and the Friends 
within the territory of the First Parish had become landowners 
exempt from Parish taxes and voters in town meetings. The 
most laconic and yet comprehensive statement of the actual divorce 
of Parish and Town is to be found in Dr. Cooke's Centuries (p. 196): 



4~ LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

<% Several noteworthy events affecting the Parish took place 
during Mr. Henchman's ministry. The next year after his settle- 
ment, that is, 172 1, the Parish ceased to have its business done 
in town meeting. The separation was effected on this wise : At a 
town meeting there was an adjournment of Town business for 
half an horn- to give tire members of the Parish time for prelimi- 
nary action. Then in a meeting ordered by those of the select- 
men belonging to the Parish, a vote of members of the Parish 
was passed, ordering Richard Johnson and Theophilus Burriil to 
call a Parish meeting for organizing. The meeting was called, 
and a hundred voters attended and unanimously concurred in the 
proceedings." 

Dr. Cooke is so confident in his facts that he does not trouble 
himself with giving authorities that might lighten the labors of 
later gleaners in the local historical field, hence it was a pleasing 
surprise to find that his statement was an almost exact transcript 
of the record of the Town Meeting held March 5, 172 1-2. That 
event so tersely recorded was one of the milestones in our history. 
It marked the close of a century of homogeneous colonial life 
under the teachings of pure Calvinism expounded by three saintly 
Puritan men, Whiting, Cobbet and Shepard. 

The Town record was made as if an ordinary event was 
chronicled. Very few, if any, more striking and pregnant hap- 
penings ever took place within the walls of the Old Tunnel meet- 
ing-house. The record was coolly made. The actors so far as 
we know were as " impassive as the marble in the quarry," utterly 
unconscious of the passing of the Puritan idea and the incoming 
of the modern Town Meeting, divested of all ecclesiastical, and 
clothed with only civic powers. 

On the surface it would appear that this separation should 
include a discontinuance of the use of the meeting-house for the 
transaction of Town business. 

On the contrary the Town used the building in all its official 
affairs for more than three-quarters of a century after this time. 
Within its homely walls men of the First Parish, Friends, the 
voters of Lynn field and of Saugus debated and made appropria- 
tions for Town purposes while much history was making itself. 



lynx historical society. 43 



The great Provincial feat of arms — the capture of Louisburg— 
the trench Gibraltar in America — by Massachusetts soldiers and 
sailors in 1745, happened while the Old Tunnel remained the 
Council House of the Town. 

Lexington, Concord, Bunker Hill, the war of the Revolution, the 
adoption of the Federal Constitution, the Presidency of Washington 
and of the elder Adams and other marvelous events occurred while 
the village Solon s continued there to discuss problems of social life. 

Three generations walked up and clown the sombre aisles ere 
the friction between Parish and Town became apparent, which 
resulted in 1S06, in the abandonment by or the expulsion of the 
Town from the meeting-house. 

In order to show the tense relations of the people — the 
conservative clinging of the towns-people to the old house even 
after they had forsaken the faith therein preached — some reports 
and votes have been culled from the records. Only a small frac- 
tion of the voluminous records is copied, and that not consecutively 
but barely enough to give a hint of the importance of the issue in 
the minds of the fathers. First we copy from the Parish Records. 
By the Parish Records it will be seen that the Parish in the begin- 
ning of the contention did not absolutely bar the Town from its 
house, but simply insisted that it should only be used in rotation 
with the other meeting-houses in Town — that is, that the hitherto 
undivided burden of the Parish in providing shelter for the Town 
should be divided and borne in part by the other societies. 

March 20, 1805. the Parish 

''Voted that the Town shall not in the future hold their Town 
Meetings in the First Parish meeting-house only in rotation, and 
the April meeting to be considered as one. 

" Voted that the Parish committee be directed to notify the 
selectmen of this vote." 

Jan. 9, 1806 : 

" Voted to accept of the report of their Committee which is 
as follows, viz. : The Parish, at their meeting in March last, voted 



44 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

that it was not their choice that the Town should hold any Town 
Meeting- in future in the said Parish meeting-house unless by 
rotation in the several meeting-houses in Town, and that the meet- 
ing in April then next ensuing might be holden in said house as 
the first in rotation, — the meeting was accordingly held in said 
house, and in May following:, the Town voted that their meeting 
should be holden in rotation in the several meeting-houses in Town. 
" The selectmen of the Town now ask leave of the First Parish 
to hold their next Town Meeting in their meeting-house as the first 
meeting- in the rotation. Although the Parish conceive that they 
have already taken their turn yet they are willing to sacrifice their 
own private interest and feelings, and submit to a partial evil for 
the general good, it is therefore voted that the Town be permitted 
to hold their next meeting in the said house as the first in the 
rotation. Provided that the next meeting be holden and finished 
previously to the first day of March next. 



Signed by the committee, 



James Gardner. 
VVm. Mansfield. 
Fred Breed. 
Thomas Rhodes. 
Charles Newhall 



Jan. 16, 1806. 



Jan. 30, 1806 : 

" Voted that the Parish committee be a committee to appear 
at the adjournment of the Town Meeting and forbid the Town in 
the name and behalf of the First Parish, of ever holding any Town 
Meeting in said Parish meeting-house in future unless by the con- 
sent of the said Parish. ' 

" Voted that the Clerk serve the Town with a copy of the 
above vote." 

From the Town Records. 

"The undersigned, a committee chosen by the Town to treat 
with a committee from the First Parish in Lynn in order to effect 
a settlement of a dispute that has arisen relative to the right 
claimed by the Town to transact their public business in the old 
meeting-house so called, report that they have the mortification to 
learn that the Parish has declined to unite with the Town in this 
pacific measure. But although the conduct of the Parish in this 



I LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 45 

fe'sjpect may appear to close the door against all further attempts 
of the Town towards a com promise, nevertheless, when we recol- 
lect that some of the proceedings of our last meeting however 
well intended or proper in themselves, give umbrage to many of 
our brethren of the parish as being in their opinion calculated to 
prevent a reconciliation, and although we are compelled in justice 
to the Town to declare that we view the measures as respects their 
appointment of a committee as sufficient evidence of the Town's 
accommodating disposition, and that the omission of the Town 
through mistake to invest them with power to treat, etc., does not 
in the least weaken or impair that evidence, nevertheless, we, the 
Town, in the spirit of charity and candor will give the complaints 
of the Parish before hinted all that weight they may desire, that 
we take leave further to recommend that in order to evidence be- 
yond a doubt that the Town are still desirous to promote concord 
and harmony between them and their brethren of the Parish, and 
to avoid the manifold evils of a contest in law, where the interest 
of the parties are so connected and blended that however decided 
in law will, in addition to an enormous expense, be attended with 
far more pernicious consequences, when fellow citizens of the 
same town, the same neighborhood, family connections, near rela- 
tives, etc., will be enclosed in an unhappy quarrel which in the 
nature of things will give strength to those discordant passions 
which are the baneful source of human misery. 

" As a means to avoid these accumulated evils and to estab- 
lish tranquility among all classes of our fellow townsmen, your 
committee respectfully submit for your consideration, whether it 
would not be best for the Town by Resolve by vote, that we are 
still ready to listen to any proposals from the Parish that may tend 
towards an amicable settlement of this unhappy dispute. 

Joseph Fuller. 
Henry Burchstead. 
Nathan PIawkes. 
Kich'd Shute. 
Timothy Munroe. 
Mica'h Newhall. 

Committee? 
Lynn, Feb. 9, 1806. 



j ne warrant for Town Meeting dated March 7, 1806, con- 
tained this article : 



46 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

"Also to determine what further measures are necessary fur 
the Town to adopt to support and establish a privilege of meeting 
in the old meeting-house, which they and their fathers have ever 
heretofore enjoyed and to determine where the next meeting shall 
be called." 

■ Town Meeting, March 17, 1806 : 

" Voted to refer the determination of the matter of right of 
meeting in the old meeting-house to the adjournment of this meet- 
ing, and the Town are ready to meet the Parish by their committee 
to compromise the business." 

Under same date the next action was : 

''Voted the Selectmen apply to the Methodist Society for 
their house to hold the April meeting in. 

" Voted to adjourn this meeting to the place where the April 
meeting shall be held." 

The warrant for the annual meeting for the choice of State 
Officers for 1S06 began as follows : 

"The freeholders and other inhabitants of the Town of Lynn 

qualified as the law requires, are hereby notified to attend a "town 
Meeting to be holden at the Methodist meeting-house in said Town 
on Monday the 7 th day of April next at 1 o'clock p.m. 

Henry Hallowell. 
Henry Oliver. 
dated Nathan Hawk.es. 

Lynn, March 28, 1806. ' Selectmen" 

Lynn, April 7th, 1806 : 

"Town met agreeable to notification. At this meeting it was 
voted to choose a committee for the purpose of fdling up the 
blanks for a compromise with the old Parish, relative to the Town's 
using the old meeting-house, and to report at May meeting. 

" Voted, Zachariah Attwill, Samuel Collins, Abner Cheever 
and Thomas Mansfield be said committee. 

"Voted the Selectmen provide a house for May meeting at 
the Town's expense." 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



47 



May i, iSc6 : 



"The Selectmen issue the warrant for Town Meeting for 
choice of representatives to General Court to be held in the old 
meeting-house, May 12, 1S06." 

This report was made at the meeting : 

" As it appears to be the wish of both Town and Parish to 
have the unhappy dispute between the Town and First Parish 
respecting the old meeting-house amicably adjusted the following 
is submitted to the Town for their consideration ; it is thought it 
will meet the views of both parties. 

" The Town cannot comply with the proposition of the Parish 
as offered to the Town's committee. 

" But the Town are willing to relinquish all their right in the 
said house on the following considerations viz. : 

" 1. The Town shall have leave to transact all municipal 
business in the said house as usual. 

"2. The Town shall sweep said house and if necessary wash 
it as soon as may be after each meeting. 

" 3. The Town shall make good all damages which the house 
shall sustain by such meeting as soon as may be after each meet- 
ing, and in case of any dispute the Town shall choose one man 
and the Parish one, who shall be arbitrators to fix sd damage. 

"4. The Town shall pay the Parish Treasurer annually the 
sum of dollars as the Town's proportion of the general re- 

pairs in and on the. house. 

'•'5. This stipulation shall continue in force for the term of 
years. 

"The committee appointed on the part of 'the Town at their 
meeting on the 7th of April have met with the committee on the 
part of the First Parish and have agreed to till up the blanks left 
within the proposals as follows, viz. : the blank for compensation 
to be. tilled with twenty-eight dollars per annum and the blank for 
the number of years filled at twenty years. 

"And the same is submitted to the Town and Parish. 



Lynx, April 28, 1806. 

Zach'ii Attwill. 
Sam'l Collins. 
Abner .Cheever. 
Thomas Mansfield. 
on the part of the Toutn. 



Fred'k Breed. 
Thomas Rhodes. 
Will'm Maxsfield. 
Eph'm Breed. 
on the part of the Parish"'' 



48 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

"Voted by the Town on the 12 of this instant May to reject 
the above report." 

The next warrant for Town Meeting was issued Jan. 10, 1807, 
and the place of meeting was the Methodist meeting-house. 
At the April meeting 1S07 there was allowed: 

" For the use and repairs of the Methodist meeting-house 
$42.25. 

" N.B. The above sum included nineteen dollars paid to Col. 
Breed and Harris Chadwell for the use and repairs of the old 
meeting-house.'' 

In 1S06 as well as in 172 1 the irritating element which caused 

the First Parish to close its doors upon the Town may be traced 
to ecclesiastic origin. 

The Quakers and the several Parishes could legislate, in peace 
with the Parish in the old house. 

A more aggressive sect had come to Town and pitched its 
tent within sight of the old Tunnel. 

Benjamin Johnson, a prominent man — a leader in the de- 
velopment of the shoe business, and a member of the First Church 
— had heard and been impressed with Methodist preaching in the 
South. 

' Mr. Johnson invited Jesse Lee, the eloquent Methodist preacher, 
to come here. Lee arrived on the 14th of December, 1790. Since 
that day Methodism has been a particularly active and vital power 
in Lynn. Mr. Lee set up his church — militant — in the houses 
of Mr. Johnson and of Mr. Enoch Mudge, the one at the north end 
of Market Street, the other ac the corner of South Common and 
Vine Streets. One was east and the other was west of the old 
meeting-house, so that he flanked the Parish. Sometimes he was 
permitted to occupy the meeting-house for evening meetings, and 
when this was refused, the Methodists, on the 14th day of June, 
1 79 1, began to build the first meeting-house of their society just 
in front of what is now Lee Hall. In twelve days from the time 
the timber was cat we are told the house was ready for occupancy. 
It was a plain unfinished building, 34 by 44 feet. It suited the 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 49 

plain earnest Methodists of those days. It stood out in full view 

of the First Parish meeting house, and a few vears later it became 

,■-.'" 
a convenient shelter for Town Meetings, when the First Parish 

ejected the Town from the Old Tunnel. Thereafter, with occasional 

meetings at the hall of Paul and Ellis Newhall at the corner of 

Market and Essex Streets, it was occupied by the grace of the 

Methodist Society for Town purposes, till the erection of the Town 

House on the Common in 1S14. 

There are two sides to every shield. 

The freemen of the Town claimed that thev and their fathers 
had always used the meeting-house, that a tax upon the whole 
property had erected the building and had maintained it, and that 
consequently they and their successors had a prescriptive right to 
enjoy the same privileges. Ac the time of the controversy the 
First Parish was in a dire plight. Its pastor Rev. Thomas Gush- 
ing Thacher lacked the power of his predecessors ; he had not the 
gifts of solidity and earnestness, his intellectual parts were not 
equal to that of the family to which he belonged. The functions 
of his sacred office were not appreciated by him and secular affairs 
engrossed his mind. Mr. Thacher's ministry extended from 1794 
to 1S13. 

His immediate predecessor, Rev. Obediah Parsons, had faults 
even more inconsistent with his profession than those of Mr. 
Thacher. 

With such guides it is not strange that Jesse Lee's intense- 
earnestness and his fiery preaching made the new sect popular. 
A large portion of the First Parish went over to the Methodists. 
Even the deacons of the Parish, William Farrington and Theophi- 
lus Hallowell, joined the new movement and carried away the 
communion plate of the Parish, probably under the impression 
. that where the deacons were there was the Church. Over the 
carrying away of the communion service a long contention was 
had which resulted in its return ; with it Deacon Farrington came 
back. But seeds of bitterness remained. The positive, pushing 
men of the community were in the new Church. 

According to the opinion of those who remained in the 



o.t 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



Parish they had abandoned the faith taught by the founders, and 
in forming an alien Church thcv had forfeited their rights in the 

old meeting-house. 

To the Parish it seemed unfair that men who worshipped 
elsewhere should seek to retain a secular control over the meeting- 
house. Hence the denial of its use by the Parish — the appoint- 
ment of a joint committee — - the compromise agreed to by the 
committee recognizing the right of the Parish to receive compen- 
sation for its use and the refusal of the Town to accept the com- 
promise. 

The Parish was weak in numbers, but by the vote of its 
enemies its contention was maintained that secular as well as 
ecclesiastical use of its property was in the Parish, and that the 
title to the Old Tunnel was in those who maintained the faith of 
the fathers in years of disaster as well as of prosperity. 



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THE REGISTER 



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.van Historical Society, 



LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS, 



POR THE YEAR 1599 



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LYNN, MASS. 

THE NICHOLS PRESS — TKOS. P. NICHOLS. 
I9OO. 



o\<- 



OFFiCERS FOR THE YEAR 1900. 



1 
I 

E • . President, 



BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

I r ice-President, 

HENRY F. TAPLEY. 
Treasurer ; 

EUGENE A. PUTNAM. 

Recording Secretary, 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL 

Corresponding Secretary, 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



Members of the council. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Charles II. Newhall. 

William S. Burrill. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Philip A. Chase. James S. Newhall. 

Samuel A. Guilford. Charles F. Peirce. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. Eugene A. Putnam. 
Rufus Kimball. Henry F. Tapley. 

Earl A. Mower. John Woodbury 

George H. Martin. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COMMITTEES. 



Custodians. 



William S. Burrill. Earl A. 'Mower. 

George S. Bliss. Charles F. Peirce. 

Henry N. Comey. 



Finance. 

Philip A. Chase. Eugene A. Putnam. 

Luther S. Johnson. Henry 13. Sprague. 

To Secure Publication of Old Toivn Records. 

Nathan M. PIawkes. Charles C. Fry. 

Amos F. Breed. Rollin E. Harmon. 

Philip A. Chase. John Woodbury. 

To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens. 

Charles Buffum. Henry \V. Johnson. 

S. Oliver Breed. James H. Richards. 

Samuel A. Guilford. William P. Sargent. 

Isaac K. Harris. William Stone. 
Dayid N. Johnson. 

Books, Documents and Pa/>ers. 

Samuel B. Stewart. Geokge H. Martin. 

Charles E. Clark. Howard K. Sanderson. 

Louise S. Earle. James H. Van Buren. 

Frank. Keene. Charles J. H. Woodel'ry. 

Mary F. Little. John P. Woodbury. 

Lectures and Public Meetings. 

Henry F. Tarley. Sallie H. Hacker. 

William S. Burrill. Charles H. Newhall. 

Harriet K. Clough. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Micajah P. Clough. May L. Sheldon. 



[ ■ 

LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Genealogy . 

fJoHS L. Parker. Anna L. Johnson. 

Joanna A. Bubier. Enoch S. Johnson. 

Harriet K. Clough. Melissa J. Littlefield. 

Nathan M. Haw res. Harriet L. Matthews. 

Susan T. Hilt. Emma F. P. Mower. 

John C. Houghton. Mary A. Parsons. 



Publications and Printing. 

Howard Mudge Newhall. Henry F. Tapley. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. John G. Warner. 

James S. Ne whale. 



Ph. otos;raphy. 

k 

George S. Bliss. John W. Darcy. 

Edward F. Bacheller. Charles F. Pollard. 

Charles A. Cross. 



Collection of Historical Relics. 

John Woodbury. Caroline P. Heath. 

Emma H. Breed. Mary A. Parsons. 

Stephen L. Breed. Charles F. Peirce. 

Sallie H. Hacker. -Ida J. Taplev. 



'Marking Historical Locations. 

Rupus Kimball. Richard J. Nichols. 

Isaac F. Galloupe. John L. Parker. 

Arthur B. Mudge. James H. Richards. 



Necrology. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

Rufus Kimball. David H. Sweetser. 

Israel A. Newhall. 



O LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Compilation of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Harriet L. Matthews. 

John C. Houghton. Israel A. Newhall. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

David N. Johnson. Mary A. Parsons. 

George H. Martin. Elizabeth E. Rule. 



Geology and Botany 



Elmer F. Dwyer. 
Lillie B. Allen. 
Luther Atwood. 
Charles Neal Barney. 
Mabel Earle. 
Philip Emerson. 



Jonathan W. Goodell. 
Henry W. Heath. 
James M. Marsh. 
Frank B. Rowell. 
Myra D. Allen Ruppel. 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Ella D. Bartlett. 
Lydia C. Davis. 
Anna L. Dunn. 
Addie G. Fuller. 
Maria B. Harmon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary M. Johnson. 
Virginia N. Johnson. 



Reception. 

Emma F. P. Mower, 
Kittie M. Newhall. 
Marion W. Newhall. 
Mary F. Pevear. 
Sarah F. Smith. 
Sarah S. Spinney. 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Ellen L. Warner. 
Jennie R. Woodbury. 



and Members of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BY-LAWS. 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the Voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 

from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two vears. 
f 

ARTICLE II. 



MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second Wednes- 
day evening in January, time and place to be determined 
by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. A less number may 
adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direction of 
the Council, or President, and shall be called upon the 
written request of twenty members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. 



O LYNN HISTORICAL SOClETV. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-President, 
Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Treas- 
urer, who shall he elected annually by ballot, from the 
members of the Council. They shall perform the usual 
duties of such officers, and such other duties as the Coun- 
cil may require. 

ARTICLE A'. 

DUES. 

4 The admission fee shall be one dollar, and trie annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July first of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Q 

j 

- 
i 

THE MEETING-HOUSE OF THE SECOND CHURCH 
IN LYNN. 

This description of the old Meeting-House was contributed by 
p Hon. Nathan Mortimer Hawkes. 

I 

The frontispiece of our ''Register" of last year was 
from a drawing made bv Alonzo Lewis, showing the 

© © 

meeting-house of the First Parish of Lynn (not the first 
house), built in 1682. popularly known as the Old Tunnel 
Meeting-House, with a plan of pews in 1739. 

One of the resulting events from the building of this 
house upon the Common, instead of the compromise loca- 
tion — Choose Hill — proposed by the settlers at Saugus 
and Lynnfield, was the establishment of the North Precinct 
of Lynn upon substantially the lines of the present town 
of Lvnnrield. 

The initial move for the setting off of a new Precinct 
was on January 16, 1711-2, in a petition' of the Inhabitants 
of Lynn Farms. The distance to travel for worship to the 
First Parish meeting-house was the grievance. Reading 
(Wakefield) was nearer, but another town, the Parish 
meeting-house of which was already crowded, and which 
they had no right to attend, though they contributed to it 
as well as to their own Parish. 

On November 17, 1712, Lynn voted, at the request of 
our neighbors the farmers, so-called, u That all the part 
of the town that lies upon the northerly side of that high- 
way that leads from Salem to Reading be set off for a 
Precinct, and when they shall have a meeting-house and a 
minister, qualified according to law, settled to preach the 
Word of God amongst them, they shall be wholly freed 
from paying to the ministry of the town, and not before." 



IO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The inhabitants of the new Precinct bought a parcel 
of land which is now a part of "The Green" at Lynnfield 
Centre. The deed is dated "This seventh day of Decem- 
ber, 1 7 14, and in the first year of the reign of our Sovereign 
Lord, George, King of Great Britain," etc. 

In the description are these words — "And the said 
parcel of land is butted and bounded as followeth, viz: all 
that land where on ye sd Precinct Meeting blouse now 
standeth." 

So that the Meeting House was erected prior to 
December 7, 17 14, though the first Pastor, Rev. Nathaniel 
Sparhawk, was not installed over the Second Church in 
Lynn till August 17, 1720. 

The house was originally nearly square, or to be 
exact, it -was about thirty-seven and a half feet long, and 
about thirty feet wide; height of "post" about eighteen 
feet. In 1782 it was enlarged by cutting it open and in- 
serting a new portion, making the building fourteen feet 
longer. No alteration has ever been made in the height. 
There were originally doors on three sides, like the other 
Puritan meeting-houses. The pulpit and the pulpit window 
were on the north side. 

There were galleries upon three sides. For one hun- 
dred and ten years no lire was built in the house, and the 
upper part of the building was used for the storage of the 
powder of the Precinct, which was considered almost as 
essential as preaching. Our fathers believed in the Crom- 
wellian maxim, "Put your trust in God; but mind to 
keep your powder dry." 

It has twenty-six deep windows, which have been 
renewed several times. Its frame is of massive oak con- 
struction. Its interior has been changed by removing the 
galleries, and by putting in a floor, making two stories. 



TA'NN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 

Only two other church edifices in the State can vie 
with it in point of age and use. One of these is " The Old 
Ship/' so-called, at Hingharn. The other is St. Michael's 
(Episcopalian) of Marblehead. The latter was built in 
the same year as our North Precinct meeting-house. 

This building has a unique interest to the people of 
Lynn. It not only has been a church edifice for all these 
years, but it is the building wherein the civil affairs of the 
district, precinct, and Town of Lynnfield were transacted 
down to 1892, when the new Town Hall was dedicated. 

It is without question the most historic building within 
the limits of the original town of Lynn. It is older than 
The Old South meeting-house, Faneuil Hall, or Kings 
Chapel, of Boston. From roof to foundation stones it is 
sound, and can be maintained for many coming generations 
as a cherished memento of the strong race which in travail 
brought forth a great nation. 

The illustration in this "Register" is from a photo- 
graph taken in August, 189S. 

For further description of this building, reference may 
be had to Wellman's History of Lynnfield, to a paper read 
by Mrs. Mary A. Parsons before this Society, May 11, 
1S99, entitled "A Trip to Lynn Farms," and an address 
entitled "Why the Old Town House was Built," prepared 
by the writer of this sketch for the Dedicatory Exercises of 
the New Town Hall, Jan. 28, 1892. 



12 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording- Secretary, 

At the Third Annual Meeting- of the Society, at the Room of the Society, 
Wednesday t'vening, January 10, 1900. 



The veneration which lias heretofore attached to the in- 
stitutions and organizations dating back into the eighteenth 



o 



century, will soon begin to attach to those organized in the 
nineteenth, century, and this Societv, which has been 
well begun, will seem to the future members, in the next 
century, as being more venerable than it is, with all 
the pleasant associations that ever belong to age. Mav 
this closing year of the century be as interesting to the 
Society as the year just passed has been. 

The Society has not only furnished information, en- 
larged its collection of historical relics, and increased its 
membership, but has also, without interfering with its work 
and objects, made its room sociable and enjoyable, 

During the year there have been seven meetings of 
the Society, twelve meetings of the Council, one Field Day, 
and three visits with other historical societies. Seventy- 
nine new members have been elected, six have withdrawn, 
and live, Martin H. Hood, George B. Currier, Howard 
Perlev, Julia A. Earle, and John L. Robinson, have died, 
The present membership is three hundred and twenty-nine. 

The members of the Society and, through the cour- 
tesy of the local newspapers, the people of Lynn also, have 
heard several instructive historical papers. 

On January n, 1899, Isaac K. Harris, Esq., read a 
paper at the annual meeting on the subject of " Old 
Mills." 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 3 

On March 29. Miss Sallie H. Hacker read an inter- 
esting paper on " The Social Laws and Customs of the 
Quakers*' 1 At the close of the paper the presiding officer 
of the evening suggested that all who were members of the 
Society of Friends, or descendants of families of Friends, 
should rise, and it was found that a large portion of the 
audience were descendants of old representative Lynn 
Friends 1 families. 

On April 27, Mr. George II. Martin gave a talk, 
taking as his subject, "From English Parish to New 
• England Town." 

On May 11, Mrs. Mary A. Parsons of Lynnfield Cen- 
i Ere read a paper entitled, " A Trip to ' Lynn Farms,' with 

a Glance at the Old Precinct Book.' - ' 

I 

On May 25, Mr. Luther Atwood read a paper, which 
had been prepared by Mr. Charles Buffum, giving " A 
Word Picture of Lynn, Showing its Streets and General 
Aspects from Fifty to One Hundred Years Ago." 

On November 28, the first series of lantern slides of 
historic houses and locations in Lynn and Saugus, which 
had been prepared by Mr. George S. Bliss and the Com- 
mittee on Photography, was shown, and information and 
explanations in connection with them were given in an in- 
I teresting manner by Air. Benjamin N. Johnson. These 

slides, obtained at the expenditure of a moderate amount 
of money on the part of the Society, and by the devotion 
of much valuable time and intelligent effort on the part of 
Mr. Bliss and the Photographic Committee, are the prop- 
erty of the Society, and will preserve for the next genera- 
tion not only the story, but the form, of some of the old 

houses and buildings. The work of this Committee is in 

f • 

the line suggested by Hon. Abner C. Goodell, Jr., at the 

first meeting of the Societv, and will be continued in a 



14 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

moderate degree each year, collecting a valuable heritage 
for the people of Lynn. 

On December 28, at the last meeting f the Society 
for the year. Henry T. Lummus, Esq., presented a paper 
entitled, "The Established Church of Massachusetts." 

The annual Field Day excursion took place on Thurs- 
day afternoon, June 29. Conveyances were taken at 
the room of the Society, and after a ride to some of the 
old houses in the westerly section of the city, and an in- 
spection of tablets which had been erected by the Society, 
various houses and locations were visited in Saugus and 
parts of Lynnfield. Castle Hill, the highest point in 
Southern Essex, was visited by the excursionists. Lunch 
was taken on Mount Gilead in Lvnn Woods, and the 
company returned after witnessing one of the most gor- 
geous sunsets possible to be seen. 

On June 17, a large number of the Lynn Society 
attended a meeting of the Essex County Historical Socie- 
ties at the Whittier Homestead, near Haverhill, by invita- 
tion of the Haverhill Historical Society, and Haverhill 
Whittier Club. Those who attended will not soon forget 
the perfect day, the charming ride from Newburyport to 
Haverhill, and the instructive trip. 

On August 2, some of the members visited the Peabody 
Society, passing a most enjpyable afternoon and being 
liberally entertained, and on September 27, the Society 
visited the objects of interest at Marblehead, by invitation 
of the. Marblehead Society. 

On September 5, representatives of the Society ap- 
peared before the City Government at a hearing in regard 
to the location of an ancient shoemaker's shop on the 
westerly end of Lynn Common. The President stated 
the case of the Society in a clear and able manner, and 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



asked that some public location for the building be granted, 
but stated that the call for the hearing had been erroneously 
published, as the Historical Society did not ask, or intend 



to ask, a location at the westerly end of the Common, but 
for any public location which the City Government consid- 
ered suitable. Citizens of West Lynn, and residents along 
the Common, appeared by petition and representatives, to 
protest against the .location published, many of those 
signing the protest being members of the Society, and all 
. signing under the supposition that the Society had asked 
for the location unfortunately and erroneously named for 
the hearing*. 

An ancient shop has been donated by Mr. Amos P. 
Tapley, and until such time as the Society ma}' be able to 
procure a permanent location, either on public or private 
property, he lias offered to Mr. Charles Buffum, of the 
Committee, a temporary location for the building on his 
propertv on Mall Street, to put the shop in good, repair, 
and to allow sufficient space around it for the public to 
view the interior and the furnishings. 

On January 27, the President was authorized to sign 
for, and in the name of the Society, a petition to the 
Massachusetts Legislature, signed by other historical socie- 
ties, petitioning the Legislature to continue and complete 
the publication of the Province Laws. 

The Committee on Room have had a busy year in 
arranging articles received, and in the recent removal to 
the new room. 

. At the April meeting of the Council, the Secretary 
was directed to write to the Trustees of the Lynn Public 
Library, asking if the Society might have accommodations 
in some part of the new building in process of erection. 
Such a letter was sent to the Trustees of the Library, but 



10 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

as the building is not yet completed, and the Library itself 
has not been able to occupy, no reply has thus far been 
received. The needs of the Society, however, called for 
a larger room than the one at No. 90 Exchange Street for 
the winter's work and meetings, and the Committee on 
Room was authorized to rent the rooms in the stone and 
brick building of the Lynn Institution for Savings and 
First National Bank, No. 25 Exchange Street, on the east- 
erly half of the third floor. A large room for an assem- 
bly room, and a smaller one for the Council and Commit- 
tees, have been rented at an annual rental of two hundred 
and fifty dollars. The present rooms of the Societv are 
pleasant, convenient, roomy enough for present uses, and 
in a building safely and substantially constructed for the 
protection and preservation of the property. The new 
rooms were dedicated by a social evening, on January 2, 
1900, which was in charge of the ladies, and a large num- 
ber of the members of the Society . were present on the 
occasion. This was also intended as the commencement 
of the work of the Monday afternoon teas which will be 
held each week during January, February and March. 

The new room is exceptionally well suited for a his- 
torical society, having an abundance of wall room for old 
documents, maps, photographs, and all matters requiring 
display. Graduallv the room will become more interesting 
in these features, and even its present appearance repre- 
sents a large amount of work on the part of the gentlemen 
who have been in charge. It is open each Monday after- 
noon, and visitors can be admitted at other times by appli- 
cation and arrangement. 

The following gifts have been received during the 
year : 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 17 

From the Secretary of State of Massachusetts* volumes entitled, 
The Bulfmch Front, Old Representatives' Hall, The Historic 
Codfish. Memorial of Frederic T. Greenhalge, the fifth vol- 
ume cf the Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revo- 
lution, and Report of the World's Fair Commission. 

From Margaret E. Johnson, 92 years old, the tin kitchen, spit and 
skewers used by the grandmother of the donor. 

From Hannah H. Bartlett, old map of Essex County, and geogra- 
phy of Essex County. 

From L. A. Chapman, fans, sandals and slippers from India, and 
1 copy of an announcement of a Whig festival. 

From Helen Collins, three old letters, and list of names of chil- 
dren in the fifth district school in 1829. 

From Charles E. Clark, the genealogy of the descendants of 
George Little. 

From John L. Parker, genealogy of the Rowell family. 

From John Jay Putnam, genealogy of the Converse family. 

From Mrs. Joseph X. Smith, genealogy of the Fuller family. 

From Mary A. Parsons, genealogies of the Bancroft family, Par- 
sons family, Hart family. Smith family, copies of old Centen- 
nial newspapers, pamphlets entitled, Old Meeting House at 
Ipswich, Historical Sketch of Ipswich, Autumnal Memories 
at Ipswich, Ipswich in Verse, volume Puritan Republic, and 
photograph of the old Lynnfield Meeting House. 

From Albert Needham, framed portrait of General Foster, who 
led the Dan vers minute men at the battle of Lexington. 

From James M. Tee!, schoolhouse seat used in an old Lynnfield 
school. 

From Hon. Robert T. Swan, eleventh Massachusetts Report, and 
Report of Lynn Auditors for the year 1S45. 

From Hon. Andrew McFarland Davis, currency table. 

From Pamelia B. Mudge, certificate of subscription to Kossuth 
Hungarian Fund. 

From Nathaniel Holder, Sr., 1S65 Directory. 



iS LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Harriot F. Purintori, old lace boot, newspaper about the 250th 

anniversary of Boston, copies of Lynn Mirror, Boston Times. 
Observer, and Lynn Record. 

From Rev. Augustine Caldwell, pamphlets entitled, Eliot, Maine. 
Kimball Family News, Early Caldwellsof England, Proceedings 
of Eliot Historical Society, Old Eliot, and Eliot Miscellany. 

From Patrick S. Curry, pamphlet entitled, " Irish Schoolmasters." 

From estate of the late Henry M. Brooks, papers and pamphlets. 

From Sarah B, Dinsmore, New England Primer, Catechism, 1801, 
1SC3, 1S04 almanacs, two old sermons, and pewter porringer. 

From Charles H. Newhall, black walnut bookcase. 

From Antoinette S. Page, baluster from the Old Tunnel Meeting 
House. 

From Daniel S. Newhall, 1S32 Directory. 

From William S. Burrill, 1S56 Directory. 

From Ann S. Hill, 1841 Directory, and an 1829 History of Lynn. 

From Samuel H. Barnes, melted nails from Boston fire. 

From Dr. Nathaniel Gammon, Directories for 185S, 1S60, 1865, 1869. 

From a friend, account of the 51st anniversary of American Inde- 
pendence in Lynn, on July 4, 1S27. 

From Charles J. H. Woodbury, pamphlets entitled, First Congre- 
gational Manual, and floating Bridge at Lynn. 

From Alfred Cross, photograph of old Johnson house. 

From Charles F. Peirce, copy of poems of Robert Burns, in hand- 
writing of Alonzo Lewis. 

From Caroline S. Haven, glass lamp shades. 

From Mary B. Patch and Carrie E. Baker, old saddle bags. 

From John P. Woodbury, volume entitled, Essay on Demonology 
and Witchcraft. 

From. Elizabeth M. Atkinson, pewter platter. 

From Charlotte M. Robinson, volume of illustrations from 1884 
political papers, announcement of Ward 4 recruiting associa- 
tion, city reports, books, papers, and genealogy of the 
R.obinson family. 

From Ipswich Historical Society, sketch of John Winthrop the 
' Younger. 



i 

LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. IQ 

From Eben F. P. Smith, bill of lire engine to town of Lynn, and 

guaranty of same. 
From George H. Batchelder, photograph of Exchange Street block 

and buildings on Exchange Street. 
From Elizabeth D. Howe Edmands, portrait of Rev. William 

Coolidge Richards, and programme of dedication of old Lynn 

High Schoolhouse, January 8; 185 1. 
From Henry A. Smith, material about old Lynn Academy for 

special article which appeared in the Daily Evening Item. 
• From Richard I. Attwill, old papers. 

From Henry A. Pevear, toaster and ancient lamp. 

From Dr. C. H. Bangs, carpet loom. 

From John W. Hutchinson, a stove with a history. 

From Harrison Newhall, an old Goold Brown grammar. 

From Benjamin Collins, of Dover, N.H., old foot-stove, brass lock, 

sand-box, and long iron fork. 
From Amos P. Tapley, an old shoemaker's shop. 
From Lydia C. Davis, chair owned by the mother of Alonzo 

Lewis. 
From Col. Luther Caldwell, volume Memoirs of Anne Bradstreet. 
From Mrs. Drew, two rewards of merit given to scholar by Alonzo 

Lewis. 
From Howard Mudge Newhall, pamphlets. 
From Lydia E. Galloupe, newspaper clippings, and list of names 

of old Lynn P'ire Club. 
From Peabody Historical Society, Essex Institute, Medford His- 
torical Society, Western Reserve Historical Society, Beverly 

Historical Society, Bosionian Society, Old State House 

Society, Nantucket Historical Association, Worcester Society 

of Antiquity,' and other Societies, publications. 
From Dr. Arthur E. Llarris, old almanac. 
From Anna M. Pickford, genealogy of the Tolman family, and 

printing blocks used by the late John B. Tolman in printing 

the Lynn Record and Lynn Awl. 
From Charles F. Peirce, charter members and membership cards, 

and a screen. 



20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Thomas C. Johnson, a sermon' delivered before the Empire 
Fire Association, on the occasion of their visit to Philadel- 
phia on October 2, 1S59. 

From Nathan M. Hawkes, volume ten years of Lynn Park Commis- 
sioners' Reports, volume Public Libraries of Massachusetts. 

The Society is now well established for work, and the 
co-operation of all the Committees and individual members 
of the Committees, is what is especially advisable. Some 
of the Committees have been very efficient, but there is 
much interesting work in some of the departments which 
has not yet been commenced. The work of the Society 
is in the coming years. What has been accomplished is 
but the beginning, and there is much pleasure to look for- 
ward to in the great amount of growth that can be made 
in the different departments. There is something to work 
for, and with an object in view there always comes inter- 
est. In its historical acquisitions, in its financial support, 
in its solid list of members, and in the confidence of the 
public, the members of this Society can feel that they are 
filling a useful place in the community. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21" 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



CHARLES F. PEIRCE, Treasurer, 
in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dr. 

1S99 Jan. 11. Balance . . . . $169 08 

1S99 Jan. 11. 1 

to > Dues received from members . ,. . . . 743 00 

1900 Jan. 10. ) 

For Registers 30 00 

From other sources ^ 9 16 

£ Q3I 24 

Cr. 

Paid Room rent $216 67 

Janitor 33 75 

Hire of halls for meetings and enter- 

ments 51 00 

1000 Annual Registers 174 00 

Notices of meetings, printing and 

postage 65 63 

Photography, plates, slides, etc. . . 52 43 

Typewriting and stenography ... 22 00 

Carpenters, stock and labor .... 12 82 

Teas and socials 31 17 

Furniture 12 00 

Frames, hooks, wire, etc 7 40 

Express, moving, etc 8 00 

Collection of dues 11 25 

Sundry expenses 16 21 

Balance 236 91 

. " $95 J 2 4 

We, the Auditing Committee of the Lynn Historical Society, have 
examined the accounts of Charles F. Peirce, Treasurer, for the year end- 
ing January 10, 1900, and find the same correct. The balance of cash on 
hand appears to be $236.91. 

•W. E. SYMONDS, 
D. H. SWEETS ER, 

LYNN, January 10, /goo. Audit 1 tig Coitunittee. 



22 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO PROCURE INFORMATION 
FROM ELDERLY CITIZENS. 



To the Council of the Lynn Historical Society: 
Gentlemen, — As chairman of the "Com- 
mittee to Procure Information from Elderly Citizens," I 
have to report: that we organized by selecting Mr.' William 
Stone as our Secretary, and decided to procure a requisite 
number of memorandum books, with ample number of 
pages, and to place them in the hands of persons who are 
interested with us in procuring all we can of events and 
facts in our past history from all old and middle-aged per- 
sons. Later we concluded to have one hundred of these 
books of ninety-six pages each, to be well placed, for 
quicker results, before it might become too late. The gate 
continues to open frequently on those who possess what we 
need for preservation. 

We have paged the books, put headings on certain 
pages to aid those unused to writing, and have printed on 
the inside of the front cover a request and appeal to our 
members and citizens. 

We have stated meetings for conference and to report 
progress, on the first Thursday evening of each month, and 
we expect the coming year will show r excellent results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. BUFFUM, 

Chairman, 
Lynn, December jo, iSgg. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GENEALOGY 



The Committee on Genealogy has held monthly meet- 
ings during the year, at which matters relating to the subject 
have been discussed, family records received and examined, 
and information given to those who desired it. A growing 
interest in the work of securing a collection of local gene- 
alogies has developed, and we have already sixty-live family 
records, in uniform style on the blanks of the Society, and 
we are assured that many more are in preparation. A con- 
venient card catalogue has been commenced in which the 
name of the ancestor and the descendant appear. By the 
aid of this catalogue a required record is readily found, 
and a person searching for members of a family whose 
name is on the list, will receive valuable assistance. 

In addition to the records referred to, we have re- 
ceived the printed ancestry of the Tolman family, from 
Mrs, Anna M. Pickford ; the Fuller Genealogy, from 
Mrs. J. X, Smith ; the genealogies of the Parsons, Hart and 
Smith families from Mrs. Mary A. Parsons, of Lynnfield. 

The Committee is desirous of improving on the record 
of the past year, and to this end we invite the co-operation 
of the Society. We are persuaded that a little effort on 
the part of those members who have not already filled out 
their blanks, will enable us to make a good showing in 
the year to come. To those who have tiled their family 
records with the Committee, we desire to express our 
thanks and warm appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John L. Parker, 

Lvxx, January jo, rgco. . * Chairman. 






. 



24 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PHOTOGRAPHY. 



The purpose of this Committee is to obtain, by the 
various processes of photograph}', and in as permanent 
form as possible, a record of the historic houses, buildings 
and localities of Lynn. This record is to be in the form 
of lantern slides, for illustrating lectures ; prints, to be 
mounted in albums accessible to members of the Society ; 
and enlargements for exhibition purposes to be placed on 
the walls of the Society rooms. Desirable material is to 
be collected in several ways : 

First : Through gifts and loans of photographs, en- 
gravings and sketches. 

Second : Through co-operation with the professional 
and amateurs photographers of Lynn. 

Third : To secure photographs of buildings, street 
scenes, and localities of the present day, which will be of 
historic interest in the future. This work will necessarily 
have to be done mainly through the individual efforts of 
the members of the Committee. 

During the past year the attention of the Committee 
has been mainly devoted to securing lantern slides with 
the object of arousing the interest of the Society in this 
work. 

Acknowledgements are due to C. J. II. Woodbury, 
for five lantern slides ; W. T. Bowers, the veteran -Market 
Street photographer, for the loan of twenty-one slides ; 
J. W. Darcy, for loan of negatives for eleven slides ; 
E. F. Bacheller, for loan of negatives for two slides ; 
James TI. Richards and others, for the loan of prints, and 
for assistance in many ways. Thirty-six negatives were 



I 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



^0 



made by the Committee from buildings, houses, and 
localities during the past year. Thirty-six negatives were 
made by the Committee from photographs, drawings, etc. 
Total number of slides, one hundred and thirty-six. 

The actual expense to the Society has been $52.43. 

During the coming year it is proposed to give special 
attention to securing prints, in order to lay the foundation 
for a good album of historic Lynn views. 

The Committee hopes that members of the Society 
will interest themselves in this work, and send to the 
Secretary a list of all old photographs and sketches in 
their possession, so that a complete list may be obtained of 
just what material is available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Geo. S. Bliss, 

Chairman. 
Lynx, January /o, /goo. 



26 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY. 



MARTIN HERRICK HOOD 

Was born on the 15th day of September, 1813, in that 
portion of Lynn which is now Nahant, in the house called 
"The Castle," overlooking the sea. 

The glistening waves to which the child opened his 
eves were before the man, when after a long and well- 
rounded life the same eyes were closed at his home on 
Ocean Street, INI arch 25, 1S99. 

No man in Lynn had better lines of ancestry on both 
father's and mother's side than Mr. Hood. Discreet matri- 
monial alliances connected the Hoods and Herricks with 
eminently respectable families from colonial days.. 

Mr. Hood's paternal line was as follows : Richard 1 
of Lynn, the immigrant; Richard 2 (Nahant); Abner 3 ; 
Richard 4 ; Martin Herrick 5 . 

His maternal line was as follows: Henry Herrick 1 , 
of Salem, the immigrant : Joseph 2 : Martin 3 (of Lynnfield) : 
Benjamin 4 ; Dr. Martin 5 ; Clarissa 6 married Richard Hood : 
Martin Herrick Hood 7 . 

Richard Hood, who came from Lynn, England, 
located on Nahant Street, where his son Richard was 
born. The later generations of the Hood family made 
their home on the peninsula of the same name. 

Henry Herrick, who came to Salem with Endicott, 
was the son of Sir William Herrick of Beau Manor Park, 
in the Parish of Loughborough, in the County of Leicester, 
England. 



MARTIN MERRICK HOOD. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 2 J 

Ills great-great-grandson, Dr. Martin Herrick, after 

whom the subject of our sketch was named, though he 
lived in the little villages of Reading and Lynnfield, was 
a noted man and a participant in stirring times. He was 
one of the mounted men who assisted Paul Revere in 
spreading the alarm which resulted in the conflict at Lex- 
ington and Concord, April 19, 1775, and he became a 
Surgeon in the War of the Revolution. 

At the age of twelve years the young Martin H. Hood 
removed with his parents to Portland, Maine, where he 
t was initiated into the peculiarly Lynn " Mystery" of shoe- 

making, in which he was employed until 184s, when he 
returned to Lynn and became a manufacturer of shoes. 

On December 9, 1S52, he married Sarah G. Hay, 
daughter of Francis Hay, of Charlestown, Massachusetts. 
She survives him. 

In 1861 he became a pioneer in the division of pro- 
cesses of manufacture which grew up at that time, by asso- 
ciating himself with the sole-cutting firm of Johnson, 
Hood <y Co. The firm name when he retired from active 
business in 1886 was Hood, Johnson & Co. 

He was a director from their organization to the time 
of his death in two of our financial corporations — The 
National Security Bank and The Security Safe Deposit 
and Trust Co. 

He was zealous and active in the growth of the Lynn 
Historical Society. 

Any notice of Mr. Hood would be barren which did 
not mention his connection with the Oxford Club wherein 
he exemplified the fact that advancing years bring no 
shadows to a serene and evenly-balanced mind. Like 
Dr. Holmes, he was not so many years old, but so many 












_ 









28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

It has been said that he was an eccentric man. Mr. 
Hood was an enthusiastic student of the geology of Nahant. 
After he was more than fourscore years of age, lie was as 
eager as a school-boy to explore the hidden recesses of 
Pirates' Glen — to visit Indian Rock — to inspect the site 
of our Old Garrison House — and to walk the length of 
the remarkable "Kame" on our northern border, which is 
known as " Serpentine Mound.'' 

He rode oftener through Lynn Woods than any other 
Lynn man. He was a devotee of Nature. He was an 
optimist as to locality, inasmuch as the surging sea and 
the swaying pines that encircle us made Lynn to him the 
most precious spot on earth.. If these notions make an 
eccentric man then he was one, and the only comment we 
can make is to regret that there are not more such men in 
the community. 



HOWARD PERLEY 

Was born in Lynn, May 21, 1838. He died here May 30, 
1899. 

His immigrant ancestor was Allan Perley, who was 
born in Wales, England, in 160S ; came to Massachusetts 
with Winthrop's fleet in 1630, located in Woburn, and died 
at Ipswich, December 28, 1675. 

From Allan 1 the line of descent was as follows: 
Thomas 2 (born in Topsfield, 1641, died in Boxford, 1709) ; 
Thomas 5 ; Asa 4 ; Samuel 5 ; Dr. Daniel 6 (born in Boxford, 
1804, died in Lynn, 18S1) ; Howard 7 . 

His mother was Caroline Gage (Stearns) Perley. 
She was born in Middlebury, Vermont, in 1814, and died 
in Lynn, 1899'. She was the daughter of Lewis Stearns, 
born in Easton, Massachusetts, Jan. 2, 1779 (son of Joshua 






i / 



HOV/ARD PERLEY. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



and Hannah Stearns), and Rebecca Stearns (daughter of 
Isaac and Mary Gage), who was born May 14, 1785. 

Mr. Perley married Eliza F., daughter of John G. 
Warner and Eliza (Xewhall) Warner.' She, with a son, 
Clarence W., and a daughter, Alice H., survives him. 
Another son, George F., was drowned thirteen years ago. 

Mr. Perley was connected with the firm of John B. 
Alley & Sons, of Boston, and their successors, Alley Bros. 
, & Place, for thirty-six years. V-"V* 

A cultured musician, and a fine singer, he was an 
early member of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church Choir, 
as one of the men members. 

lie was an active promoter of the Lynn Choral Union, 
which took part in the first Peace Jubilee, and later he 
was a member of the Lynn Musical Association. 

He took a strong, helpful part, in the Lynn Boys' 
Club. 

Fraternally he was affiliated with Mt. Carmel Lodge, 
F. and A.M., and Kirtland Lodge, Knights of Honor. 

He was a member of the Oxford Club, and of the 
Lynn Historical Society from its organization. 

He led a blameless, unobtrusive life, marked by kindly 
deeds. Welcome everywhere, he was happiest in the 
family circle of which he was the loved and honored head. 



*?0 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



GEORGE BURRILL CURRIER. 

George Burrill Currier was born in Lynn, Nov. 24, 
1827, and died in Lynn, May 30, 1899. His ancestors 
were, — Richard 1 (immigrant), who was born in 1617, 
and settled in Amesbury; Deacon Thomas 2 , born 1643, 
married Mary Osgood : Thomas 3 , born 167 1, married Sarah 
Barnard of Nantucket, lived in Amesbury ; Thomas 4 , born 
17 17, married Jemima Morrill, lived in Amesbury ; Joseph 5 , 
born 1746, married Elizabeth Tweed of York, Maine, lived 
in Deerfieid, N.H, : Joseph 6 , born 1775, married Lydia 
Witt Richards of Lynn, (he walked from Deerfieid to Lynn 
when he came here to settle) ; Joseph R 7 , born 1S05, 
married Elizabeth M. Clark, lived in Lynn: George B. 
Currier 8 . 

Mr. Currier's maternal ancestors were, — George 
Burrill 1 , immigrant; Lieut. John 2 , married Lois Ivory; 
Hon. Ebenezer 3 , married Martha Farrington ; Theophilus 4 , 

married Mary ; Theophilus 5 , married Martha 

Newhall ; Mary 6 , married Theophilus Clark ; Elizabeth 
M 7 , married Joseph R. Currier ; George Burrill Currier 8 . 

Mr. Currier had long service in the Fire Department, 
joining one of the engine companies of the town in 1842, 
and was on the Board of Engineers for seven years. He 
served on the School Committee from 1S63 to 186S, in the 
Common Council in 1869 and 1870, and in the Board of 
Aldermen in 187 1. He was a member of the Board of 
Assessors from 1873 to 1878, and from 18S1 to the time of 
his death, serving nearly a quarter of a century. 

No citizen of Lynn was better or more favorably 
known than Mr, Currier. Thoroughly honest, frank and 
truthful, never afraid to do what he believed to be right, 



%- 



h 



GEORGE BURRILL CURRIER. 



i 
i 

% 

*' 
i: 



Julia Ann Earle. 



■ 

LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 71 

genial, companionable, with a warm heart and a free hand 
for the needy, he gained the esteem of all with whom he 
came in contact. A model public servant, a lover of his 
native city, and one of her best citizens, his death was a 
loss to the whole community. m ft '/) 

Mr. Currier married, Dec. 25, 1S50, Miss Mnrgtrret 
E. Alley, of Lynn, and she with two daughters, Margaret 
E., widow of Benjamin E. Porter, and Mary L., and one 
granddaughter, Bertha Currier Porter, survive him. 

!#■■..■"' 



JULIA ANN EARLE, 

Who died in Lynn, June 3, 1S99, is the first woman on 
the roll of membership whose death the Society has to 
record. She was born in North Benvick, Maine, Nov. 26, 
1837, an d was the daughter of Samuel and Lavinia (Hall) 
Snow. Both her parents were of colonial stock. On 
the maternal side, she was a descendant in the eighth gen- 
eration of Deacon John Hall, who was born in 1617, and 
became a prominent citizen of Dover, N.H. From Deacon 
John, the line was John 2 , John 3 , John 4 , William 5 , Philip 6 , 
Lavinia 7 . John 4 is said to have fought in the French and 
Indian War. Mrs. Earle's maternal grandmother was sister- 
in-law- of General Allen, and the daughter of "Squire" 
Nason, w r ho was Captain of a company of Matrosses in 
1778 at York, and later moved to Sanford, Maine. On 
the paternal side, Mrs. Earle's ancestry has not been traced 
with care, although it is known that the. family were early 
settlers of York County, Maine. One of the streets in 
Boston, near Hay market Square, was formerly named 
Snow Street for her father's uncle, who owned consider- 
able land in that part of the town. Her father himself, 
who was one of the leading citizens of his native village, 



32 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

North Berwick, was a man of great decision of character. 
He voted the Free-Soil ticket at a time when only two 
other men in the town dared to vote* with him, and his 
home was one of the stations on the il Underground Rail- 
road" of slavery days. 

Mrs. Earle lived in North Berwick until Dec. 17, 1867, 
when she was married to Anthony Earle of Worcester, 
who had served throughout the Civil War in the Army of 
the Potomac. From this time until her death, Mrs. Earle 
lived in Lynn. At first she attended the Unitarian Church, 
but later became a member of the North Congregational. 
On the formation of the Lynn Historical Society, she was 
enrolled as a charter member. She had two daughters, 
Louise Snow and Mabel Lavinia, who with her husband 
survive her. Although in poor health almost from the 
time of her marriage, she led an active life of unfailing 
devotion to her family. She was a woman of quick intelli- 
gence, constant cheerfulness, strong will and rare fortitude, 
and was capable of the utmost loyalty and self-sacrifice. 



JOHN LEWIS ROBINSON. 

John Lewis, an officer of the Crown, and Sarah Lind- 
say were married by the Rev. John Treadwell of Lynn, 
in the old parish, September 25, 1764. They lived in the 
Lindsay house and soon removed to New York City. 
Their daughter, Lydia Lindsay Lewis, married for her 
second husband John Robinson. Soon after the wedding 
the couple embarked onboard the Kepfile for Halifax, N.S., 
and settled at St. Andrews, New Brunswick. 

Christopher Robinson was the eighth child of John 
and Lydia, and was born in St. Andrews. August 25, 1799. 
In June, 1808, he removed to Lynn, Massachusetts, 



John Lewis Robinson, 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. , 33 

and on September 20, 1S20, was married to Eliza Spinney, 
daughter of Samuel and Betsy Spinney of Lynn. She 
died in Lynn, November 10, 1S74, aged 72. From 182.] 
to 1855, Christopher Robinson was the leading shoe manu- 
facturer of Lynn, and his goods attained a national repu- 
tation. 

John Lewis Robinson, the subject of this sketch, who 
died June 21, 1899, aged 71 years, was born April 8, 182S, 
on North Common Street, in the house of Benjamin Oliver, 
then next easterly to the present residence of Judge Harmon, 
and was the fourth child of Christopher. He first attended 
the school of Miss James, near where the Mildred Range, 
so called, has since been built. Afterwards he attended 
at Master John Batchelder's, in the Franklin Street school- 
house. 

In 1842, his father had for a systematic bookkeeper, 
William Bassett, afterward Lynn City Clerk, from whom 
John imbibed his first taste for correct accounting, as ex- 
emplified in the then common single entry system, a knowl- 
edge which, in later years, was turned to profitable use. 
When Mr. Bassett left his fathers employ, John took the 
place, and found himself a member of the firm, when in 
September, 1848, the new brick factory was finished. 
This still stands on South Common Street, corner of 
Shepard Street. 

December 24, 1S48, he married for his first wife, 
Eliza Ellen Pratt of Lynn. . Their children, now living, 
are Adelaide Herbert, a daughter, adopted 1882, and now 
Mrs. Frank Thomas Cross; a son, born April 2, 1859, 
George Tyler, married September 1, 1SS5, Nellie Gale, 
daughter of William L. and Hannah Eliza Selmanof Lynn. 

From 185 1 to 1861 he did business for himself, as 
manufacturer and commission dealer in boots and shoes. 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

In 1861 his services were desired by Colonel Hincks, and 
he enlisted in the 19th Regiment. Company D, and was 
chosen to take charge of the regimental clerical work. 
From 1863 to 1865, he was in the service of the War 
Department. In 1866, he was with the Register's Bureau, 
Treasury Department, receiving two promotions in four 
months. Returning to Lynn, he acted as bookkeeper for 
various firms, and about 1878 opened an office in Boston 
as expert accountant. 

In 1884, he found that his plans of bookkeeping were 
much simpler and far ahead of any of those he had seen, 
and he formulated the Robinson System of Accounts. He 
published his first book in 1884, and a complete set of 
books in 1886. . From then to his death he had a constantly 
increasing business. In 1898 his system was in use by 
nearly eleven hundred firms and one hundred different 
trades. 

As a tribute to his accuracy, we quote from Gen. O. O. 
Howard, endorsed by him March 22, 1864: "I cordially 
endorse the above recommendation. I remember the beauty 
and completeness of his Regimental records while 1 was 
commanding 2d Division, 2d Corps : " also a clipping from 
the Boston Journal-. " The report of the 19th Mass. was 
rec'd yesterday, ahead of all others, as usual." 

He was a member of the Oxford Club until a short 
time before his death, and of Gen, Lander Post 5, G. A. R. 
He was an interested member of the Historical Society, 
which was the recipient of many gifts from him. 

On April 8, 1886, he married at Wellesley Hills, 
Mass., Charlotte Maria Smith, daughter of Joshua and 
Susan Gardner of Milford, Mass., who survives him. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 35 



M E M B E R S 



April 27, /Sg7- Abbott, Waldo Lovejoy 25 Hanover St. 

" Aborn, Charles Henry Swampscott 

J0.11.2S, /SgS. Allen, Lillie B 120 South Common St. 

April 27, /Sg7. Allen, Walter B 2 Walden St. 

Attwill, Alfred Mudge 52 Broad St. 

" Atwood. Luther 8 Sagamore St. 

! 

Nov. 23, /Sgg. Babcock, Bessie B 48 Breed St. 

April 27, 1S97. Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Sept. 9, /SgS. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2743 Prairie Ave., Chicago," 111. 

April 27. iSg7. Baker. Frederick E . . 1S9 Lewis St. 

March iS, iSgg, Baker, Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St. 

" Baker, Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean St. 

March 12, /goo. Barker, Ralph E 24 Chase St. 

April 27. iSgy. Barney. Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

" ► Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

" Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 2$, rSgS. Bartlett, Ella Doak 61 Atlantic St. 

Oct.18.1Sg7. Bartlett, Hannah H 115 Nahant St. 

Jan.28.1SgS. Bartlett, John S. .- 61 Atlantic St. 

April 27. /Sgg. Bazzoni, Mary A 28 Elsmere Place 

June 1. 1897. Beal, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

April 27, iSg7. Bennett, Josiah Chase 7S Beacon Hill Ave. 

" Bennett, Larkin Everett 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Jan. 27, iSgg. Berry, Benjamin Hun 238 Ocean St. 

June g, iSgg. Berry, John W 105 Franklin St. 

" a Berry, Susannah W 105 Franklin St. 

March 27, /goo. Bessom. William B 44 Elsmere Place 

Nov. 24, /8g7. Bliss, George S 24 Chase St. 

Oct. 2S, /SgS. Blood, Eldredge H 157 Maple St. 

Feb. 20, /goo. Breed, Adelaide J .... 17 Nahant St. 

April 27. /Sg7. Breed, Amos Franklin 19 Union St. 

Dec. 28, /Sgg. Breed, Caroline A 61 Newhall St. 

Oct. 1/, /Sgg. Breed, Clara E. . .40 Nahant Place 

June /, /Sg7. Breed, Emma Hawthorne 112 Green St. 

April 26, /goo. Breed, Florence L 31 Tudor St. 

A r ov. 2S, /Sgg. Breed, Frances Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 



36 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

i 

Oct. //, iSgg. Breed, Frank M 40 Nahant Place 

A'o; 1 . 2S, iSgg. Breed, George Albert 52 Baltimore. St. 

March 27, igoo. Breed, George Herschel . 40 Nahant Place ' 

April 27, 1897. Breed, George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

" Breed, Henry W 48 Nahant St. 

" Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Nahant St. 

Feb. 9, iSgg. Breed, Mary E 47 Commercial St. 

April 27. iSgy. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

" Breed. Stephen Love joy 15 Newhall St. 

" Breed, Warren Madge 31 Tudor St. 

March i8,iSgg. Bresnahan, Maurice V 128 Chestnut St. 

April 27. i8g7. Brigham, Frank F, 17 Franklin St. 

" Brown, Joseph Goold 83 Green St. 

" Brown, Mary Gerry n Light St. 

" Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Feb.g, iSgg. Bubier, Harriott Mudge 1S5 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 

" Bubier, Mary Adelaide . . . 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Mary A 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Nathan G Swampscott 

" Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Sylvester H., 2d 172 Washington St. 

" Buffum, Charles 450 Union St. 

March 18, iSgg. Buker, Frank Emery 25 Franklin St. 

April 27, iSg7. Bulnnch, Charles F 1S4 Lewis St. 

" Burrill, Abby M 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, John Irving 49 Green St. 

" Burrill, William A 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, William Stacker . 23 Nahant Place 

Jan. 17, 1 goo. Burrows, Joseph E 196 Washington St. 

April 27, i8g7- Carleton, Joseph G. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

Feb. g, r8gg. Chace, Maria Rachel 1S5 Franklin St. 

April 27, /Sg7. Chad well, George H 192 South Common St. 

Jan. 10, igoo. Chadwick, Ida F 7 Franklin St. 

" Chadwick, Sarah F 7 Franklin St. 

March 12. igoo. Chase, Ellen S 24 Chase St. 

" Chase, Frederick S 24 Chase St. 

April 27, i8g7. Chase, Percy . Brookline, Mass. 

" Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

" Clark, Charles Edward 89 Broad St. 

" Clough, Charles Bartlett 39 Cherry St. 

" Clough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 



1 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 

April 27. 1807. Clough, Micajah Pratt 253 Ocean St. 

Oct. ir, rSgg, Com-ey, Henry Newton 20 Ocean Terrace 

April 27, 1897. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 

" Cross, Charles A 8 Chase St. 

March 27, igoo. Currier. Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

April 27, 1807. ^Currier, George Burrill 101 Fayette St. 

April 26, jgoo. Darcy, Alice M 54 Commercial St. 

April 27, iSgy. Darcy, John W 54 Commercial St. 

July 2S, iSgg. Davis, Lydia C 34 Baltimore St. 

April 27, iSgj. Dorman, William E. . . . 157 Ocean St. 

Dec. 24, iSgS. Dow, Charles L 265 Boston St. 

March iS.iSgg. Dunn, Anna Lincoln 22 Portland St. 

Feb.g, iSgg. Dwyer, Elmer F ' 34 Maple St. 



April 27, /Sg7. Earle, Anthony 4 Henry Place 

" *Earle, Julia A 4 Henry Place 

" Earle, Louise Snow 4 Henry Place 

March 18, iSgg. Earle, Mabel 4 Henry Place 

Dec. 22, iSg7. Emerson, Philip 337 Maple St. 

May 20, rSgS. Emmons, Harriet N 129 Burrill St., Swampscott 

April 27, iSg7. Faulkner, Walter O. . 33 Endicott St. 

March 12, iqoo. Fenton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

Afril 27, i8g7. Flanders. George W 109 Newhall St. 

" Fogg, Eber.ezer Knowlton 2^ Lincoln St. 

July 28, iSgg. French, Hartwell S 1 Atlantic St. 

April 27, sSg7. Fry, Charles Coffin in Laighton St. 

" Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

- " Poller, Charles Sylvester 26 Vine St. 

" Galloupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

Galloupe, Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 

" Garrison, William Lloyd Boston 

July 28, i8gg. Goldthwait, Martha E. iS Portland St. 

April 27, 1897. Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St., Salem 

" Goodell, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

" Goodridge, Gertrude May . . .". . . . 5 Prescott Place 

March 12. /goo. Goodwin, Daniel W 92 Newhall St. 

Dec. 24, /8gS. Gove, William H. ....... 254 Lafayette St., Salem 

April 27, iSg7. Graham, George Herbert 62 Commercial St. 

May 20, iSgS. Graves, Harriet D. 93 Market St. 

April 27, i8g7. Graves, Isaiah 11 1 Fayette St. 



2b LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 2?) iSgj, Green. Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Feb. 20, /goo. Green, Mary A 1 Fayette Place 

" Green, S. Henderson 1 Fayette Place 

March 12, igoo. Greenwood, Grace ........ 15S South Common St. 

April 27, i8g7. Guilford, Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

jYoz'.2j, 1800. Gutterson, Annie M. . - 912 Western Ave. 

t: Gutterson, Eliza C 912 Western Ave. 

" Gutterson, Emily N 912 Western Ave. 

Af>ril 27, i8gy. Hacker, Sallie H 201 Ocean St. 

April 7, iSgg. H alii day, Marion . 35 King's Beach Terrace 

Dec. 28, i8gg. Hallowell, Caroline A.' 42 Hanover St. 

Aftril 27, i8gj. Hannan, Joseph F 36 Rogers Ave. 

" Harmon, Maria B 89 North Common St. 

" Harmon, Rollin E 89 North Common St. 

" Harris, Isaac K . 2 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 28, iSog. Hastings, Charles H 41 Ocean Terrace 

April 27, iSgy. Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremonl St. 

May 20, iSgS. Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

April 27, iSg 7 . Hawks, Esther H 16 Newhall St. 

Feb. 20, igoo. Hayes, Elihu B. . , . 43 Eastern Ave. 

April 27, 1S97. Heath, Caroline Putnam .... 132 South Common St. 

kJ Heath, Henry Warren 109 Hollingsworth St. 

July 28, iSgg. Henderson, Abby M. . . 79 Nahant St. 

March r8, iSgg. Herbert. George C 17 Chatham St. 

Sept. 9, 1808. Hill, Alfred C East Saugus 

April 27, iSg7. Hill, Susan T 14 Summer Place 

April 26, igoo. Hill, William F 11 Summer Place 

April 27, 1S97. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

" Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 

" Hilton, James E 535 Western Ave. 

April 27, iSgg. Hitchings, James W 21 Wave St. 

March 27, igoo. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

Jan. 27. iSgg. Holmes, Lucy T 67 North Common St. 

April 7, iSgg. Hood, A. Amelia ....... . Castle Road, Nahant 

.April 27, 1897. *Hood, Martin Herrick 169 Ocean St. 

" Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

Feb. 20, igoo. Houghton, Maria L 33 Breed St. 

Nov. 28, iSgg. Houghton, S. Ellen 1 Light St. 

April 27, 1897. Howe, Oliver Raymond . 20 Bedford St. 

Oct. 28, iSgS. Hudson, John E 334 Marlborough St., Boston 

April 27, /Sgg. Huntington, Alice B 181 Allen Ave. 

Jan. 2S, /8gS. Hunt, D. Gage 142 Maple St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 39 



Dec. 14, 1898, Ingalls, Edwin W 9S Laighton St. 

April 27, 189%, Ingalls, EminaF 229 Ocean St. 

Ingalls, J. Fred . 605, Western Ave. 

" Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls. Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

May l 20, 1898. Ingalls, Mary Mower 20 Alice St. 

Jan. //, jgoo. Ingalls, Robert Collyer 229 Ocean St. 

April 7. 1899. Ireson, Samuel S 170 South Common St. 



Feb. 20. /goo. James, Frank M 27 Church St. 

Oct. //, 1S99. Jameson, Charles S Farragut Road, Swampscott 

1 " Jameson, Clara H Farragut Road, Swampscott 

f 

I Nov. 24, /Soy. Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

April 27 1 ^89/. Johnson, Andrew Dudley . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

" Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Newhall 109 Nahant St. 

<; Johnson. David N 101 Newhall St. 

Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 

April '7, /S99. Johnson, Emma Burt 101 Newhall St. 

April 27, SS97. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Henry W 9S South Common St. 

Oct. n, /Sgg. Johnson, Katherine L 79 North Common St. 

April 7, iSgg. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop 1S1 North Common St. 

April 27) ^897. Johnson, Luther S 226 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22,1897. Johnson, Lydia Hacker . . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

April 7, 1899. Johnson, Mary May 226 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Virginia Newhall ....... 109 Nahant St. 

■" Keene, Frank 17 Atlantic St. 

Nov. 23. 1899. Keene, William Gerry . . . . . . . 11 Grosvenor Park 

March 18, 1899. Keith, Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1897. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

Oct. 11,1899. Kent, Harriet Marshall 52 Broad St. 

Jan. /o, 1900. Kimball, Frank W 120 Washington St. 

* April 27, 1897. Kimball, Rufus 54 Harwood St. 

Jan. 10, /goo. Kimball, Sylvia H 120 Washington St. 

April 27, 1897. Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

June /, 1897. Lamper, Sarah E 16 King's Beach Terrace 

March 12, /goo. Lee. Caroline A 13 West Baltimore St. 

" Lee, Nehemiah 13 West Baltimore St. 

April 27, 1897. Leighton, Charles 46 Bloomfield St. 



40 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

May 20, 189S, Lewis, Charles \Y 140 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Lewis, Jacob .Meek S Fayette Si. 

Jan. zg^igoo. Libbey, Mildred A 2 Atlantic' St. 

Jan. 27. 1899. Little. Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

" Little. William B 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

April '7. 1899. Littlefield, Horatia A 35 Franklin St. 

April iS, 1898. Littlefield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

April 7, 1899. Littlefield, William Bradbury 35 Franklin St. 

N0v.23.18q9. Lougee, Elva Staples 11 Atlantic St. 

May po, 1898. Lummus, Henry Tilton 4 Hudson St. 

■ April 26, 1906. Lumrnus, Lucinda M. .......... 43 Cherry St. 

April 27, 1897. Lummus, William W . 43 Cherry St. 

" Magrane, Patrick F> 247 Ocean St. 

" Mansfield, Perley B 19 Nichols St. 

Nov. 23, 1890. Marsh. George E 12 Ireson Ave. 

<; Marsh, James M 12 Ireson Ave. 

March 12^1900., Martin, Augustus B 17 High Rock Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Martin, George Henry 3SS Summer St. 

Jan. 27, 1S99. Martin, James" P 24 Sachem St. 

April 27, 1897. Matthews, Harriet L. . 42 Hanover St. 

June /, iSgy. McArthur, Annie E 120 South Common St. 

Oct. 11, 1S99. McGown, Cora K 16 Baker St. 

" McGown, Wilson Y 16 Baker St. 

April 26, 1900. Mclntire, Frederick M. . . 1600 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

March 27, 1900. Merrill, Albert R 9 Henry Ave. 

" Merrill, Harriet E 9 Henry Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Moore, Arthur Scudder '. . . . 54 Mall St. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Moore, Julia J 72 Fayette St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Morse, M. Louise 369 Summer St. 

April 27, 1897. Moulton, Daniel B 36 Sagamore St. 

" Moulton, James T 12 Carnes St. 

" Moulton, Katrcrine R 71 Federal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

** Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

Jan. 29, 1900. Mudge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Mudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 Greystone Park 

Mullen, Charles H 17 Portland St. 

" Mullin. James D '. . . 58 Newhall St. 

Jan. 28,1898. Mullin, Sarah Abby 58 Newhall St. 

April 27 y 1897. Neal, Peter Morrell 1022 Washington St. 

" Neal, William E 1022 Washington St. 



P LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 41 

Aw. 23, 1899. Neitt, Charles F 17 Bassett St. 

Neill. Eliza J 17 Bassett St. 

_//.'/r *£, /^99- Newhall, Annie Pepperel! 305 Essex St. 

Apr/7 27,' 1897. Newhall, Asa Tarbell 489 Lynn field St. 

■• Newhall. Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

A'or. 2j, /Sgg. Newhall. Frances H 10 Deer Park 

Feb. 20, 1 goo. Newhall, Francis S 18 Baltimore St. 

March 27. /goo. Newhall, George H 343 Chatham St. 

April 27. iSg 7 . Newhall. Guy 57 Silsbee Ave. 

/' Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

" Newhall. Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

' : Newhall. Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall. James Silver 132*5 o.uth Common St. 

" Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

** . Newhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

' " Newhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

" Newhall, Marion Wentworth . .132 South Common St. 

March 27. /goo. Newhall. Martha L 343 Chatham St. 

Jan. 11, /Sgg. Newhall, Mary Elizabeth 69 Newhall St. 

April 27. iSgy. Newhall. Sarah Efhe 19 Park St. 

" Newhall, Stephen Cyrus ........ 22 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall, Terry Arden 69 Newhall St. 

" Newhall. Wilbur Fisk . . 74 Lincoln Ave.. East Saugus 

" Newhall. William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

'■ Nichols, Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

" . Nichols, Frank Herbert . . 7 Prospect St. 

" Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7, /Sgg. Nichols. Fred M 15 Essex Court 

April 27, iSg7. Nichols, Richard Johnson , 32 Cherry St. 

" Nichols, Thomas Parker 11 Prospect St. 

Dec. 24. /8g8. Northrup, Arthur J. ............. 20 Baker St. 

Northrup, Hattie E . . 20 Baker St. 

April 7, /Sgg. Noyes, Mary A 235 Summer St. 

Apritzi, 1897., Oliver, James W . 69 High Rock St. 

Jan. 2g. /goo. Oliver. Rachel Louise . . 99 Beacon Hill Ave. 

June 1, 1897. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 



fax. 2g, /goo. Parke, Emma F 36 Nahant Place 

April 26. /goo. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillips Ave. 

April 27, /S07. Parker, John Lord . . . 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. //. /Sgg. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 



4- LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Jan. ti, iSgg. Parsons. Katharine M 106 Franklin St. 

April 27. iSq-j. Parsons, Mary A Lynnfield Centre 

Patten, Frank Warren . . 370 Summer St. 

" Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Paul, John M 9 Farrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F 9 Farrar St. 

" Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

Oct. it, iSgg. Pereival, Mary E 79 North Common St. 

April 27. /Sq7. *Perley, Howard 35 Hamilton Ave. 

' ; Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

March 10, 1898. Pevear. Mary F. . . . . S; Beacon Hill Ave. 

April 27. 1897. Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washington St. 

Dec. 24. iSgS. Pevear, Waldo I 87 Beacon Hilt Ave. 

Feb. 9, iSgg. Phillips. Anna Racillia . 35 Bassett St. 

.April 27, iSgy. Phillips, Arthur John . . 35 Bassett St. 

" Phillips, Frederick A 97 Henry Ave. 

Jan. 27. iSgg. Phiilips. Sarah E 21 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Pickford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

" Pinkham, Emily G 64 N ah ant St. 

Dec. 28. iSgg. Pollard, Charles F 9 Grover St. 

A'ov. 23. iSgg. Pool, Howard F 72 Johnson St. 

April iS, iSgS. Porter, Bertha Currier 101 Fayette St. 

" Porter, Margaret Ellen iot Fayette St. 

April 27, iSgy. Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

April 7, iSgg. Prichard, Charles F 17 Sagamore St. 

April 27, 1897. Putnam, Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

u Putnam, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

" . Richards, James H / 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, iSgg. Robinson. Elizabeth F. ." .47 Commercial St. 

April 27, 189/7. *Robinson, John Lewis : -. 43 Sachem St. 

Jane /, 1897. Robinson, William Pitt . 1739 17th St., Washington, D.C. 
Afareh 12, /goo. Rogers, Archibald L 24 Chase St. 

" Rogers, Emmelyn S . 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1S97. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A '. . . 30 King St. 

July 2S, iSgg. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

'• Rowell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road. 

April 27, rSgy-. Rule, Elizabeth E 80 Franklin St. 

May 20, 1898. Ruppel, Ernil F 120 South Common St. 

" Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Russell, Edward M 40 Tudor St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 43 



/an. //, 1900. Sanborn, Charles S 18 King St. 

April 2j> 1S97 . Sanderson. Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

Sargent, William P 151 Chestnut St. 



t; Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 



" Sears, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

" Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 North Common St. 

" Sheldon. May L . 49 North Common St. 

" Silsbee, Henry . . - 30 Brookline St. 

March jp, /goo. Silsbee, Lillian 1 60 Breed St. 

Silsbee, N. Everett 60 Breed St. 

Jan. pS, rSgS. Smith, Joseph X. . . ; 232 Ocean St. 

Sept. 9, 1S9S. Smith, Sarah F 232 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Spinney, Benjamin F. 270 Ocean St. 

" Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

" Sprague, Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

" Sprague, Henry Breed . . ■ Walker Road, Swampscott 

April 7, 1S99. Stetson, Helen Castle Road, Nahant 

April p-j, 1897. Stewart, Samuel Barrett . . 141 Ocean St. 

May po, 1S9S. Stimpson, Isabeile Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

Nov. p+, /S97. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

April .?7, 1S97. Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

Oct. //, 7S99. Sweetser, .Mary Abby . . 55 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Sweetser, Mary Anna . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April pj> 1S9J. Sweetser, David Herbert 55 Baltimore St. 

" Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

" Symonds, Walter E 57 Nahant St. 

" Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

Tapley, Henry Fuller 280 Ocean St. 

" Tapley, Ida J. . 280 Ocean St. 

" Tarbbx, James E \ . 102 Federal St. 

" Tebbetts, Charles Barker 37 Baltimore St. 

Jan. //, leoo. Tebbetts, Kate P 23 Wentworth Place 

April 2j, iSgj. Thompson, Fredd O. . . . Elmwood Road, Swampscott 

i; Thompson, Leon Ernest 40 Woodlawn St. 

Sept. 9, 1S9S. Tillman. Hannah Dixon 174 Broadway 

June 1, 1897. Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

April 3j, 1S97. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Nahant St. 

March .27, igoo. Tripp, .Thaxter N 11 Baltimore St. 

" Tucker, Bertha B. . , .44 Hamilton Ave. 

" Tucker, Emma A 44 Hamilton Ave. 

April 2j, 1S97. Usher, Edward Preston 23 Court St., Boston 



Q.P. 
44 ^ LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27. /Sg-j. Van Buren, James Heartt . . . . 80 South Common St. 
Nov. 23, rSgg. Vogel, Frederick M 54 Elm St. 

July > 28, /Sgg. Walter Mary E 2729 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Jan. //. iSgg. Warner. Ellen L 17 Baltimore St. 

'" Warner, John G 17 Baltimore St. 

April 27, /Sgr. Waiters, William 26 South Common St. 

" Whitman, Joseph Henry . . . . 10 Sherman Terrace 

May 20, iSgS. Whiton, Mary Ashcroft . . Chatsworth Hall Ocean St. 
April- 27, i8gf. Williams. George Hamilton. Woodland Ave.. Swampscott 

March 12, igco. Wilson, Faustina Chadwell 423 Summer St. 

Nov. 23, /Sgg. Withercll, Eunice Smith 22 Portland St. 

Afrit '27, /Sg~. Witherelr, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

' ; Wood, Lana J :...-.. 19 Franklin St., 

" Woodbury, Charles J. H 6 r Commercial St. 

Dec. 22 t 1897. Woodbury, Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

April 27, 1S97. Woodbury, John 60 Atlantic Terrace 

" Woodbury, John P. Boston 

April 26, /goo. Woodbury, Maria B 61 Commercial St. 

Jan. jo, /goo. Young. Annah A 19 Garland St. 

" Young. Elbridge S 19 Garland St. 



* Deceased. 



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j « 

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77Wt FLA GG -GRAY HOUSE. 
(Description on Page 9.; 



o . y; 



n -IE REGISTER 



OF THE 



Lvan Historical Sociefv, 



LYNN, MASSrtCHUSCTTS, 



rOI? THE Y.E'KR i 900 



/v ^ V v ^. t^% 






LYNN, MASS. 

THE NICHOLS PRESS — THOS. P. NICHOLS. 
1 90I. 



G.)< 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR -190 1 



President. 

BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Vice-President. 

HENRY F. TAPLEY. 



Treasurer 



EUGENE A. PUTNAM. 

Recording Secretary . 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL. 

Cor? ~esp on ding Seer etary . 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



•MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. George H. Martin. 

Henry F. Tapley. Charles H. NeWhall. 

Willi \si S. Bjrkill. Howard Mudge Nfavhall. 

Philip A. Chase. James S. Nfavhall. 

I' Samuel A. Guilford. Charles F. Peikce. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Eugene A. Putnam. 
Rufus Kimball. John Woodbury. 

I Earl A. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



COMMITTEES. 



Custodians. 



William S. Burrill. Earl A. Mower. 

George S. Bliss. Charles F. Peirce. 

Henry N. Come v. 



Finance. 

Philip A. Chase. Eugene A. Putnam. 

Luther S. Johnson. Henry B. Sprague. 



To Secure Publication of Old Town Records. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Rollin E. Harmon. 

Philip A. Chase. John Woodbury. 

Charles C. Fry. 



To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens. 

Charles Buffum. David N. Johnson. 

S. Oliver Breed. Henry W. Johnson. 

Samuel A. Guilford. James H. Righards. 

Isaac K. Harris. William P. Sargent. 

George C. Herbert. William Stone. 



Lectures and Public Meetings. 

Henry F. Tapley. Sallie H. Hacker. 

William S. Burrill. Mary F. Little. 

Harriet K. Clough. Charles H. Newhall. 

Micajah P. Clough. Howard Mudge Newhall. 

Louise S. Earle. May L. Sheldon. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



John L. Parker. 
Joanna A. Bubier. 
Harriet K. Clough. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
Susan T. Hill. 
John C. Houghton. 
Anna L. Johnson. 



Genealogy. 

Enoch S. Johnson. 
Melissa J. Littlefield. 
Harriet L. Matthews. 
Emma F. P. Mower. 
James S. New hall. 
Sarah S. Norton. 
Mary A. Parsons. 



Publications and Printing. 



Howard Mudge Newhall. 
Nathan M. Hawkes. 
James S. Newhall. 



Henry F. Tapley. 
John G. Warner. 



George S. Bliss. 
Edward F. Bacheller. 



Photography. 

Charles A. Cross. 
John W. Darcy. 



John Woodbury. 
Emma H. Breed. 
Stephen L. Breed. 
Sallie PI. Hacker. 



Collection of Historical Relics. 

Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary A. Parsons. 
Charles F. Peirce. 
Ida J. Tapley. 



Marking Historical Locations. 



Rufus Kimball. 
Isaac F. Galloupe. 
Arthur B. Mudge. 



Richard J. Nichols. 
John L. Parker. 
James H. Richards. 



Nathan M. PIawkes. 
Rufus Kimball. 
George H. Martin. 



Necrology . 



Israel A. Newhall. 
Wilbur F. Newhall. 



O LYN.N HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

Compilation of Local History. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Harriet L. Matthews. 

John C. Houghton. Israel A. Newhall. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Wilbur F. Xewhall. 

David N. Johnson. Mary A. Parsons. 

George H. Martin. Elizabeth E. Rule. 



Geology and Botany. 

Frank B. Rowell. Philip Emerson. 

Lxllie B. Allen. Jonathan W. Goodell. 

Luther Atwood. Henry W. Heath. 

Charles Neal Barney. Henry T. Lummus. 

Elmer F. Dwyer. James M. Marsh. 

Mabel Earle. Myra D. Allen Ruppel 



Sallie H. Hacker. 
Ella D. Baetlett. 
Lydia C. Davis. 
Anna L. Dunn. 
Addie G. Fuller. 
Maria B. Harmon. 
Caroline P. Heath. 
Mary M. Johnson. 
Virginia N. Johnson. 



Reception. 

Emma F. P. Mower. 
Kittie M. Newhall. 
Marion \V. Newhall 
Mary F. Pevear. 
Sarah F. Smith. 
Sarah S. Spinney. 
Ida J. Tapley. 
Ellen L. Warner. 
Jennie R. Woodbury. 



and Members of the Council. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



B Y - L A W S . 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 

Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected by the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 



ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second Wednes- 
day evening* in January, time and place to be determined 
by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. A less number may 
adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direction of 
the Council, or President, and shall be called upon the 
written request of twentv members. 

ARTICLE III. 

COUNCIL. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 
rules and regulations for itself and them. > 



8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-President, 
Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Treas- 
urer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from the 
members of the Council. The}' shall perform the usual 
duties of such officers, and such other duties as the Coun- 
cil may require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July first of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meeting 
regularly called, bv a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



THE FLAGG-GRAY HOUSE. 

The description of the Fla^g-Gray House was contributed by 
Hon. Nathan Mortimer Hawkes. 



Most of the historic old houses of Lynn have been 
destroyed or degraded to make room for the modern bust- 
ling city. 

Some remain, but as our lantern-slide pictures show 
they are mostly in remote parts of the old town — in the 
sections unaffected by the manufacturing impetus — in 
Saugus and Lynnfleid. 

Along Boston Street — the old colonial highway — are 
a few spared monuments of the earlier days. One such is 
the house known as indicated by our caption. It stands at 
the angle of Marion Street, facing Boston Street, and still 
has a pleasant outlook in spite of its environment. 

This sketch mav stimulate some student of leisure to 
trace the history of the house and its occupants. We know 
that it was the home of Dr. John Flagcr, who was the son 
of Rev. Ebehezer Flagg of Chester, N.H. He was born 
in 1743, and graduated at Harvard in 1761. He came to 
Lynn in 1769, and entered upon the exacting duties of a 
physician, in which calling lie evinced ability and won the 
fees and confidence of the community. He was an active 
patriot in the Revolution, and was chosen a member of the 
Committee of Safety in 1775, and commissioned as Colonel. 
in 1781, Governor John Hancock, the first Governor under 
the new Constitution, appointed him one of the first three 
Justices of the Peace in Lynn. 

He married Susanna Fowle, and they had one daughter, 
Susanna, who became the wife of Dr. James Gardiner, an 



JO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

equally noted physician and citizen. Dr. Flagg died May 

27. 1793- 

An earlier occupant of the house was Abraham Gray, 
a shoemaker, whose father, William Gray, was in 1750 
one of only three persons who carried on the shoe business 
in Lynn so extensively as to employ journeymen. 

Under this roof-tree, on June 27, 1750, was born a 
son to Abraham Gray. The boy was named William, who 
became the richest and most successful merchant of his 
time in Xew England, He was familiarly known as 
i( Bill\* " Gra\~, and in 1S10 he became Lieutenant-Goyernor 
of Massachusetts, to which office he was re-elected in 1811. 
Mr. Gray died in Boston, November 3, 1825. From his 
five sons numerous and eminently respectable descendants 
claim origin. 

Among them is Mr. Justice Horace Gray of the United 
States Supreme Court, who, a few years since visited the 
birthplace of his grandfather. 

Mr. Gray's only daughter, Lucia, married Col. Sam- 
uel Swett. Her son was Rev. William Gray Swett, the 
pleasantly remembered pastor of the Unitarian Society in 
Lynn from January 1, 1840, to the day of his death, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1843. 

The gambrel or curb roof was a style of architecture 
common in England when our ancestors left there. It 
relieved the plainness of the roof lines, and it gave added 
height in the attic without carrying the frame of the build- 
ing up another story. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 



REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL, Recording Secretary, 

At the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Society, at the Room of the Society. 
Wednesday Evening - . January 9, 1901. 



The fourth annual meeting finds the Society prosper- 
ous, increasing in numbers and in usefulness, and with 
many additions to its store of relics. Seventy-three new 
members were elected during the year. Twelve members 
have died: Charles B. Tebbetts, David II. Sweetser, E. 
Knowlton Fogg, Amos F. Breed, A. Amelia Hood. Kath- 
erine L. Johnson, John E. Hudson, S. Henderson Green, 
George W. Flanders, Martha L. Newhall, Edward M. 
Russell, and William F. Hill. The present membership 
of the Society is three hundred and seventy-seven. 

In January, a start was made on a fund for the Society 
by the deposit of one hundred dollars in the Lynn Institu- 
tion for Savings, an amount which had been saved by 
careful management from the regular income from mem- 
bers. 

On January 17, Messrs. Henry F. Tapley, Philip A. 
Chase, Nathan M. Hawkes, Benjamin F. Spinney and 
William S. Burriil, were appointee! as a Committee to co- 
operate with citizens, or with the Citv Government, in 
arranging for the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of 
the institution of Lynn as a city, which would occur in the 
month of May. 

An interesting paper, illustrated by lantern slides, was 
read at the meeting of January 17, by Mr. Elmer F. Dwyer, 
who took as his subject, "The Geological Story of Lynn," 

On February 16. Mr. Charles J. H. Woodbury read 



12 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

a paper which had been prepared by Mr. Charles Buffum, 
on the subject of " The Habits, Customs, Style of Living, 
and Business Methods in Lynn early in this Century/' 

On March S, Mr. Eugene A. Putnam presented a 
paper on the subject of " Old School Reading Books.'' 

On March 15, Mr. Charles Xeal Barney read a paper 
on the subject of " The Laws and Judicial System of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony.'* 

On April 26, Mrs. Margaret E. Porter read a paper 
on the subject of * ; East Lynn or Woodend in the Early 
Part of the Century." 

On April 5, by invitation of the President, Benjamin X. 
Johnson, and Mrs. Johnson, the members were generously 
received and entertained at the room, the occasion being 
most enjoyable. The room had been tastefully arranged 
and decorated by a committee of ladies, music was pro- 
vided and a bountiful lunch w T as handsomely served, the 
special desire of the President being that the members 
might come together and become more fully acquainted. 

On May 13, 14 and 15, the citizens of Lynn celebrated 
the fiftieth anniversary of Lynn's institution as a city. 
There were religious services on Sunday, literary exercises 
on Monday, and a grand procession on Tuesday. At the 
exercises in the Lynn Theatre, on the evening of Monday, 
the oration was given by Mr. Benjamin N. Johnson, the 
President of this Society. The high temperature of Tues- 
day, the dav of the parade, was remarkable for May, and 
was one of the hottest days ever recorded for so early a 
date. 

On June 9, an invitation was received for members to 
attend historical exercises at Dummer Academy, on June 13. 

An invitation was also received from the Methuen 
Historical Society, to visit that town with the other Histori- 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 13 

caJ Societies of Essex County, on Monday, June 18. A 
goodly number of the members of the Society availed 
themselves of the. invitation of the Methuen Society and 
passed a most enjoyable day in visiting the points of 
historic and artistic interest in that town. 

On September 13, members of the Society with 
friends took special electric cars for Wake Robin Spring, 
Lantern Rock and Dungeon Rock, in Lynn Woods. Hon. 
Robert S. Rantoul, President of the Essex Institute. Mr. 
Sidney Perley of the Essex Antiquarian, and Mrs. Osborn, 
Secretary of the Peabodv Society, accompanied the mem- 
bers. The afternoon was most delightful for the excur- 
sion, which was made by invitation of lion. N. M. Hawkes. 
the Chairman of the Lynn Park Commissioners, who had 
also provided lanterns and guide for those who wished to go 
into Dungeon Cave. Many availed themselves of the op- 
portunity. The Council had invited Mr. Philip A. Chase 
to make some historical remarks in regard to Dungeon 
Rock, which he did most interestingly to the lar^e number 
present. Remarks were also made by Messrs. Benjamin 
N. Johnson, Robert S. Rantoul, Sidney Perley, Nathan 
M. Hawkes, Walter B. Allen, Isaac K. Harris, and others. 

On October 13, the members took a tramp in the Lynn 
Woods, visiting the Wolf Pits, Rocking Boulder, Weetamoo 
Cliff, Frog Boulder and Overlook Crag. Most of those 
who attended had never visited these points of interest, 
which made the occasion unusually interesting. 

On November 20, the second in the series of Lynn 
Views, prepared by the Committee on Photograph v, was 
given, with explanatory remarks by Howard Mudge New- 
hall. This second series of views was most creditable to 
the Committee, but only represents a part of the work 
which they are doing. The Society appropriates a certain 



14 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

amount for this work, but the voluntary work that is done 
goes far beyond this appropriation, and the Chairman of 
the Committee is a much larger contributor to the work 
than the amount received from the Society. The advan- 
tage of this work will be appreciated still more as the 
years go on. 

On January 7. 1-901., in the evening the ladies inaugu- 
rated their series of Monday afternoon teas for the season 
of 1 901, by a social evening, which was largely attended 
by the members. The Monday afternoon teas which were 
commenced by the ladies three years ago, in January, 189S, 
have been beneficial in promoting social life, and creating 
interest in the Society. They continue during the months 
of January. Februarv and March. 

This year the Council changed the name of the Com- 
mittee on Room to that of Custodians. The members of 
this Corp mite e, the Custodians, Messrs. William S. Burrill, 
George S. Bliss, Henry N. Comev, Earl A. Mower and 
Charles F. Peirce, have spent evening after evening in 
marking, arranging, and taking note of the articles which 
have been contributed. The arrangement and care of the 
room speaks for their good work, which needs only to be 
known to be appreciated. Mr, William S. Burrill, the 
Chairman, has an office in the. building, and gives time 
and service to the Society which could only otherwise be 
obtained from a paid official, and but for whose voluntary 
care and service it would be almost imperative to employ 
some one for some portion of the time. 

The Committees which are most regular in their time 
of meeting, are the Committees on Genealogy and Elderly 
Citizens, and the work which these Committees have accom- 
plished goes to show what can be obtained by regular and 
earnest work. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 5 

During the year the following gifts have been re- 
ceived : 

From Charlotte M. Robinson, books and papers from the estate of 
the late John L. Robinson. 

From Hon. Charles Dean, Mayor of Maiden, volume containing 
account of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Maiden. 

From Marcella Downing, copies of papers, The Old Rat, The 
Kite Ender, The Organ, The Independent Journal, Directions 
of Christopher Robinson to Workmen, Cold Water Pledge. 

From Ipswich Historical Society, publication. 

From Harriet M. Kent, bunch of nails from ruins of Lynn confla- 
gration of Nov. 26, 18S9. 

From Sarah J. Lothrop, North Weare, N.H., Farmer's Almanacs, 
Newport Mercury, 17S1, old writing book, and old day-book. 

From Miary A. Noyes, two copies of old Lynn views in frames. 

From Cynthia Pratt Estes, book containing list of persons and date 
of burial in the Friends' Burying Ground, from 1S09 to 1S23, 
made by Cynthia Pratt ; copy of the Constitution of the 
Female Watchers' Society of the Fourth School District; 
Lynn Mirror of 1S25 ; bill of John Pratt, 1S12. 

From George T. Chase, a Boston watchman's rattle. 

From Philip A. Chase, bound volume of the Salem Gazette. 

From George S. Bliss, photograph of the old ironworks location. 

From Mrs. William Parker Jones of Boston, bound volume of the 
genealogy of the Mudge family. 

From Pa m el i a B. Mudge, volume of the Commemorative Poems 
of David N. Johnson. 

From William Stone, two copies of the Liberator. 

From Susan T. Hill, two pieces of mahogany from the Old South 
Church. Boston ; weight and key from ruins of the Lynn fire ; 
flag-seated chair owned and used in the Ingalls family. 

From Medford Historical Society, publications. 

From Howard Mudge Newhall, pamphlets. 

From Richard I. Attwill, twenty-nine packages of papers ; gram- 
mar of 1S06 ; map. 



7.6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Charlotte M. Robinson, city documents: shoe and leather 

trade documents. 
From family of John T. Moulton. School Reports from 1844 to 1890 ; 

account of the 25th anniversary of Boston Street M.E. Church. 
From Bostonian Society, publication. 
From Moses Sweetser, book of Orestes Cleveland ; photograph ; 

planisphere. 
From Frederick E. Baker, old unrecorded Lynnfield deed. 
From Frank Richards, candle used for illumination in Newbury- 

port in campaigns of Presidents William H. Harrison and 

Benjamin Harrison. 
From Sarah Bacheller, from estate of Franklin Bacheller, old Lynn 

papers ; two small atlases ; writing of Henry Hallowell ; city 

charter circular. 
From estate of Katharine L. Johnson, lamp shade ; straw cutter 

for making bonnets. 
From Francis H. Fisher, pamphlet containing sermon of Rev. Mr. 

Thacher in First Congregational Church, on the occasion of 

burial of sailors shipwrecked on brig " Peggy." 
From Warren M. Breed, plate issued by Central National Bank 

on their 50th anniversary. 
From Pamelia B. Mudge, American Magazine. 1S37 ; Night 

Thoughts, 1S26 ; Poems, 1826; English Reader, 1S24. 
From William E. Solomons, copy of Lynn News. 
From Maria A. Attwill, black satin lace boots, made in 1S50. 
From. Martha B. Shaw, American School Reader. 
From Helen H. Hovey, the Elements of English Grammar. 1796. 
From Mrs. E. F. Pepperell, large silk flag and pole of old Empire 

Fire Engine Company. 
From Adeline B. Beal, old Lynn directories ; Boston Directory ; 

volumes, the Pretty Alphabet, Pirate's Glen and Dungeon 

Rock, u. S. School Primer. 
From Martha J. Cash, Sander's Spelling Book, 1839; Rudiments 

of Philosophy and x\stronomy ; Analytical Reader. 
. From Mrs. Amos H. Burrill, official letter of George Washington ; 

Life of George Washington. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 7 

From Charles H. Hastings, six copies of souvenir Item contain- 
ing account of 50th anniversary celebration. 

From Mrs. Hiram O. Merrill, fifty-cent order payable at old Lynn- 
Hotel. 

From Emma R. Searles, bills of the old Lynn Rifle Corps. 

From Annie Pepperell Newhall, an 1820 singing book. 

From Peabody Historical Society, publication. 

From Flora H. Breed, framed portrait of Rev. Parsons Cooke. 

From Charles A. Cross, photograph of members of the Society at 
Dungeon Reck. 

From Nantucket Historical Society, publication. 

From Henry F. Tapley, bound volume of Tapley Genealogy. 

From Nahant Public Library, publication descriptive of Nahant. 

From Charles liarwood, arrow heads and Indian relics found in 
Lynn. 

From Mrs. H. E. Rowell. copies of Lynn Dew Drop, Messenger, 
Forum, Grindstone, Awl, Everett Monthly, Whig and Boston 
papers; almanac; candle snuffers. 

From Charles H. Newhall, by-laws and list of members of old 
Lynn Fire Club. 

From Alfred Cross, framed photograph of gates of King's Lynn, 
England. 

From George S. Hanson, old pincers. 

From Nathan M. Hawkes, pamphlets. 

From Charles F. Peirce, picture of old Nahant Hotel. 

From George T. Estes, old pocket book used by Henry Oliver in 
1S07. 

The work of a Historical Society is unlimited. One 
thing suggests another. A discoverv in genealogy opens 
up some new line. The work broadens with growth. The 
beginning which this Society has made is but the begin- 
ning, but it has made a place for itself, and begun a career 
of usefulness which will broaden and enlarge with the 
future. 



iS LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



- EUGENE A. PUTNAM, Treasurer, 
in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dr. 

1900 Jan. 10 Cash rec'd from C. F. Peirce, Treasurer, S251 91 

1 90 1 Jan. 9 Cash from members to date S46 co 

31,097 91 

Cr. 

1901 Jan. 9. Paid as per itemized account to date . . $So? S$ 

1901 Jan. 30. Dep. in Lynn Institution for Savings . . 100 00 

Jan. 5. Balance Central National Bank .... 153 34 

Jan. 9. Cash on hand 41 72 

■ $1,097 91 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



Lynn, Janu&ry p, igoi. 

The undersigned having been appointed to audit the ac- 
counts of Eugene A. Putnam, Treasurer, hereby report that 
they have examined the accounts and vouchers as presented to 
them, and they appear to be correct. 

Charles F. Peirce, 
Israel Augustus Newhall, 

A uditors. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



/ give and bequeath to t/ie Lynn Historical Society the sum of 
; Dollars. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 19 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO PROCURE INFORMATION 
FROM ELDERLY CITIZENS. 



To the Members of the Lynx Historical Society: 
Your Committee appointed to obtain information from 
elderly citizens beg leave to submit the following report : 

Monthly meetings have been held with the exception 
of Tulv and August. Nearly one hundred blank books 
have been provided the Committee, to be distributed by 
them to elderly citizens in different parts of the city, or to 
some member of their families, with instructions to record 
any event of interest worth preserving that has taken place 
within their knowledge. This work is necessarily slow, 
but the different members of the Committee are diligent in 
watching those who hold the books. None of the books 
have as yet been returned, and your Committee will there- 
fore submit this as a report of progress. 

William Stone, 

Lynx, Jan. 8, 1 go/. Secretary. 



REPORT OF GENEALOGICAL COMMITTEE. 



The Committee on Genealogy would renew the invi- 
tation to members of the Society to till out their family 
blanks. Of the .large membership only a small number 
have met the request, and we have in possession but eighty- 
seven manuscript genealogies where we ought to have sev- 
eral hundred. The labor of filling out these records is not 
so severe as many suppose, but where members desire 
assistance the Committee will cheerfully render it. 



20 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The Committee has received a valuable suggestion to 

the effect that members furnish the names of books in their 
possession containing genealogies not in the public library, 
and which the owners would be willing to loan for refer- 
ence or consultation. We have one such list, furnished 
by Mr. George S. Bliss, and hope that others may follow 
his example. These lists will be posted in the rooms, and 
the owners can be applied to for the privilege to examine 
their treasures. 

It is the purpose of the Committee to bind the manu- 
script genealogies into a book, and material for the first 
volume is now ready, and will be bound the coming Year. 
We believe that this method of collecting and preserving 
family records will be found in the future to be of great 
value. An admirable card catalogue to all our genealo- 
gies is now available. 

We have received printed ancestries from the follow- 
ing donors : — 

George S. Bliss, "American and English Town- 
er * o 

sends;" Mrs. John L. Parker, " Ancestors of Henry L. 
Andrews;" Howard M. Newhall, "Record of the Hart 
family:" Henry F. Tapley, "The Tapley family ; " 
Dr. Charles E. Clark, "The Little family;" John J. 
Putnam, " The Converse family." 

The Committee has held stated meetings through- 
out the year, and made general and personal efforts to add 
to our store of genealogies. To those who have responded 
to the appeals, grateful acknowledgment is made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John L. Parker, 

Chairman. 
Lynn, January g, /go/. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



21 



REPORT OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC COMMITTEE OF THE 
LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The principal efforts of the Committee during the past 
year have been directed toward laving the foundation for a 
collection of prints of Historic Lynn Views. 

The Gilson Album, with n-inch by 13-inch leaves, 
was chosen as best adapted to the purpose. The size 
admits of the use of photographs up to S inches by 10 
inches, and, being adjustable, allows the removal of prints 
for exhibition, and what is even more desirable, a re- 
arrangement, as the number of photographs increases. 
We are thus able to keep prints relating to the same sub- 
ject together, and not scattered throughout several books, 
as occurs in some collections. 

The platinotype, for its permanency, was selected as 
the standard process of printing. The work of mounting 
the prints has been started, and it is expected that the 
results will be submitted at the next meeting of the Society. 

Eighty-six (86) slides, and thirty-four (34) photo- 
graphs have been added to our collection. 

The total expense for the year has been $63.51, which 
includes $10.40 for slides illustrating Mr. E. F. Dwyer's 
lecture on geology. 

We take great pleasure in being able to report the 
promise of a valuable collection of old negatives of promi- 
nent Lynn people by Mr. W. T. Bowers, the veteran 
Market Street photographer. These portraits, taken from 
25 to 50 years ago, will prove of the greatest interest. 
Mr. Bowers has shown considerable interest in this work, 
and it is through him that we have been able to secure 
many of our most interesting pictures. 

George S. Bliss, Chairman. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY. 



Heretofore, no formal report other than the presenta- 
tion of brief necrologies has been made. 

An historical society is normally constituted of people of 
mature years. With the young, other things than genealogy, 
local history, or antiquarian lore attract the attention. 

Too often in youth we neglect to record the reminis- 
cences of the past, which fall from the lips of the elders. 

We have not in the past, nor do we in the future, 
intend to attempt any eulogies of our deceased members. 
We simply put upon record as much of the genealogical 
line as can be furnished. We relate something of the 
activities of the life touched upon, and hint at the salient 
traits of the member, such points as in the future will 
readily bring the person vividly before the mental vision. 

These sketches, if properly written, will in the future 
be of value to the local historian, and to those of our stu- 
dents who may delve in the domain of the past. 

This plan would be easy enough to carry out if the 
Committee was a permanent one, but we are as subject to 
change as other human beings. 

One of our members, himself, peculiarly adapted to 
this kind of work, has died during the year. 

The increasing membership of. the Society is a sure 
index of the solemn warning that the labors of this Com- 
mittee 'will hereafter press even more heavily than in the 
present year, when we have had to speak of twelve of our 
late active and respected associates. 

As the years roll by we shall more and more be 
obliged to rely upon the assistance of those who have been 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 23 

intimately associated with our departed friends; and, with 
this end in view, we have given these brief hints as to the 
character and the limited scope of our endeavors. 

Nathan M. Hawkes, 

Chairman. 



NECROLOGIES 



CATHERINE LLOYD JOHNSON 
Was born in Lynn-, in a house which formerly stood on the 
southerly side of Breed's Square, now removed to Western 
Avenue, near Lynn and Boston Car Stables. The house 
stood eaves towards the street, one and one-half stories, 
with high basement. Grassy banks covered the stone 
work. Stairs led from the front door, near the middle of 
the house, to the path leading to the street. Two windows 
on each side of the doorway gave good light to the cozy 
rooms. One large chimney served all the rooms of the 
main house, the kitchen being in an ell in the rear. From 
this ell one could overlook a large garden that contained 
choice vines, shrubs and trees, which bore delicious fruit 
in their season, the pride of her father, Daniel Johnson. 
She was born March 17, 1832, and died February 2, 1900. 
Her father and mother were " Quakers." 

The Johnson line of descent was : Richard 1 , Samuel 2 , 
David 3 , Nehemiah 4 , Samuel 5 , Daniel 2 , Catherine Lloyd 
Johnson 7 . 

Her mother was Comfort Allen, daughter of Moses 
Allen of Richmond, New Hampshire. She was a woman 
of great energy, a nervous temperament, never idle, kind 
heart and very decisive ; an instance : If a timid boy was 
afraid to pull a loose tooth, she would sav, '-* Let me see 



2 4 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

it," and taking a towel in her hand would ask the boy to 
open his mouth, when seizing the tooth she would have it 
out in a twinkling, then give him a ginger cookie for his 
braver)'. Buffurn Allen, brother to Comfort and uncle to 
Catherine, was an earnest advocate of the " Thompsonian 
Medical Cure." He died while taking the sweating treat- 
ment, at the " Thompsonian Infirmary," on Centre Street, 
Doctor Patten, Manager. 

The wife of Buffurn- Allen taught scholars of different 
ages, and little ones, too young to learn their letters, 

would o-Q there and receive jiood care > while their harel- 
ip & ' 

working mothers attended to other duties. Perhaps this 
was the first " Kindergarten " in Lynn, 1833 to 1S40. 

Catherine went to this school for her early training, 
then later to Master Perley Balch and Joseph Peabody, 
finishing her studies at the " Friends' School," Providence, 
Rhode Island. She taught school at Blackstone, Mass., 
for a short time, and many years later taught a short time 
at a boys' school in Billerica, Mass. 

While keeping house for her father in Lvnn, she took 
as a boarder, Mr. Roach, a graduate from Perkins Institu- 
tion for the Blind. He taught pupils to play the piano and 
had many in Lynn and vicinity. She acted as reader of 
music to Mr. Roach ; he would memorize each note and 
mark of inflection, dotted notes, sharps, flats, &c, and 
then play the piece on the piano, afterwards teaching it 
to his pupils : he was a very successful teacher, and always 
went about without a leader. 

Moses Allen Johnson was brother to Catherine ; he got 
a position in a mill in Lowell, and while there invented, or 
helped to perfect, a process of felting that made felt goods 
of practical value. To-day, felt hats, blankets and other 
articles are an everv-dav convenience. 



i N 

I 



y 



CHARLES BARKER TEBBETTS. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



-:> 



■ 



Catherine and her father lived with Moses until Moses 

and her father died, then she returned to Lynn for her 
future home. She was very fond of young children, and 
many are now living who mourn for Aunt Kate, as they 
were wont to name her. She was a member of the 
Woman's Club and Lynn Historical Society, and always 
interested and ready to help along all social forward move- 
ments for the uplift of humanity. 

It was a custom of this branch of the Johnsons, 
brothers and sisters, uncles, aunts and cousins, to assemble 
each year for a " Fish Fry" at Nahant. Sometimes Bass 
Point was selected, sometimes North Spring, or as after- 
ward named Maolis Garden. At these gatherings none were 
more happ\ r and entertaining than Catherine and her father 
Daniel. Daniel always made the chowder, and his anxiety 
was shown in frequent questions, as: " Rebecca, has thee 
peppered and salted this chowder enough?" or, " Lydia, 
can thee spare me more milk, I think this is not quite rich 
enough?" Each member would try to catch a nipper, as 
the fish was called, for the chowder, from little tot to 
bearded elder. " So all had a share in fun and feast. Those 
experiences are now past history. 



CHARLES BARKER TEBBETTS 

Was born at Rochester, New Hampshire, January 26, 1843, 
trie fourth son of Judge Noah Tebbetts of the Court of 
Common Pleas of New Hampshire, and of his wife Mary 
Esther (Woodman) Tebbetts. On both his paternal and 
maternal sides he was in the eighth generation from emi- 
grants who arrived in this country in 1635. We have a 
record of a grant of land in Dover, New Hampshire, to 
Henry Tebbetts, the first emigrant, dated 1643. The next 



26 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

two generations, Jeremiah ami Henry, remained in Dover. 
Edward, the fourth in descent, born 1737, died 1795, 
moved to Rochester, New Hampshire, and there Charles' 
grandfather James, and his father Noah, were settled when 
he was born. On his mother's side, Mr. Tebbetts was 
descended from Edward Woodman, who came to Newbury, 
Mass., June 3, 1635. He was one of fifteen out of the 
ninety-one grantees of Newburv who bore the title of Mr. 
He was a deputv to the General Court, 1636, '37, '39 and 
'43. Four generations of Woodmans remained at New- 
bury, but the Reverend Joseph, 174S-1807, removed to 
Sanborhton, New Hampshire, and his son, Jeremiah Hall, 
came to Rochester where Mary Esther, 1S0S-1879, Charles' 
mother, was born at what was once the Woodman Man- 
sion, but is now a hotel. 

Noah Tebbetts, Charles' father, was educated at 
Dartmouth, as long as Dartmouth was a university, and 
upon the re-construction of the college he removed to 
Bowdoin, from which he graduated in the class of 1822. 
He was admitted to the bar soon after, practised law, 
entered the New Hampshire Legislature in 1842, and in 
January, 1S43, was appointed Circuit Justice of the Com- 
mon Pleas. After presiding over an arduous criminal case 
in the summer of 1844, he was taken ill and died in his 
forty-second year, leaving a widow and five young children. 

Charles, the third surviving son, was educated at 
public schools of Rochester, N.H., and at the High School 
at Med ford, where his eldest brother, Theodore, was pastor 
of the first Parish Church. Leaving school in i860, he 
entered the employ of Moses Howe, of Haverhill, coming 
to Lynn soon after to work with Lucian Newhall. The 
death of his eldest brother, Theodore, in 1863, and the 
fact that his two other brothers were in the army, exempted 



. .'■-.■ 



v\. 



h 



DAVID HERBERT SWEETSER. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 27 

him from military service during the war. In r86.|, he 
started to manufacture shoes in a small wooden building 
on Union Street, on the ground now occtipied by the 
Tucker Building. In 1866, he entered into partnership 
with Lucian Newhall, and on Mr. Xewhall's retirement in 
1871, Mr. Tebbetts continued the business alone. In 1880, 
he built the factory now standing on the corner of Oxford 
and Willow Streets, where he remained in business until his 
retirement in 1895 . As an illustration of the development of 
the manufacture of shoes in Lynn, Mr. Tebbetts' output in 
1864 was five cases a clay, and in the Willow Street factory 
it reached one hundred and twenty-five cases a day. 

Mr. Tebbetts was interested in all that concerned the 
welfare of Lynn. He was a member of the Board of 
Managers of the Lynn Hospital, President of the Board 
of Trustees of the Unitarian Church, a contributor and 
well-wisher to the Lynn Public Library, and a member of 
the Lynn Historical Society. He was a willing giver to 
many charities. He was a Vice-President of the Massa- 
chusetts Republican Club, a member of the Oxford Club, 
the Essex Club, a sometime member of the Algonquin 
Club, and a member of the Unitarian Club. He was a 
Director of the Central National Bank of Lynn, and of 
the Lynn Institution for Savings. He was fond of travel- 
ing and had spent several winters in Egypt. While at 
Cairo he died very suddenly, February 27, 1900, mourned 
by his family and by a large number of friends. 



DAVID HERBERT SWEETSER 



Was born December 1, 1833. His father was David S. 
Sweetser, a descendant of Seth Sweetser, who came to 
Charlestown in 1635. His mother was Peace Buffum 



2$ LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

(Alley) Sweetser, a descendant of Hugh Alley, who settled 
in Lynn in 1635. 

The brick house at the head of Market Street, at the 
junction of Broad Street, is the birthplace of D. II. 
Sweetser. The house was built by John Alley, and at first 
was occupied in part by the Sweetser family, but later 
became a public house under the successive names of 
Mansion House and Rail Road House. 

The Sweetsers' next house w r as a cottage on Summer 
Street, where the family must have felt at home, because 
of the fact that the estate had been owned by the Alleys 
for two hundred years. The land bounded by Market, 
Summer and Shepard Streets, was mostly owned by de- 
scendants of Hugh Alley. 

The boy was a pupil of Master John Batchelder at 
the Ward 5 Grammar School. We infer that he was a 
good scholar, as he was admitted to the High School the 
year of its organization alter passing an examination that 
to-dav would be called difficult. 

The time at this school was cut short by an offer of a 
situation in John B. Alley's leather store in Boston. In the 
commercial panic of 1S57, and in the depressed state 
of business in the earl)' years of the Civil War he received 
his business training. The responsibilities of the manage- 
ment of affairs impressed him, and made him prudent and 
cautious and qualified him for the offices of trust that he 
so faithfully filled for nearly thirty years. His seven years'" 
service to Mr. Alley was an apprenticeship for a subse- 
quent partnership in the firm, from which he finally with- 
drew to organize the successful shoe-finding business under 
the name of Sweetser, Skilton & Dole. With the dissolu- 
tion of this firm Mr. Sweetser retired from active mercan- 
tile life, but kept in touch with affairs as the President of a 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 29 

Company created by Lynn men, called the Exchange 
Insurance Com pan}'. 

The great Boston fire of 1S72 marks the next epoch 
in his life, for in the great destruction it wrought, the 
Exchange Insurance Company was swept away with the 
rest, and the President, finding himself freed from all busi- 
ness duties, spent the spring and summer in a trip through 
Europe in company with S. M. Bubier, and other friends. 
On his return, his natural relation to business interests 
were re-established by becoming President of the Lynn 
Institution for Savings. As President and as Treasurer 
twenty-six years, he continued to direct the policy of the 
Institution, and to take a lively interest in public affairs 
until the day of his death. 

The public and semi-public offices that he filled during 
his busy life were many. The following list embraces the 
most important : Member of the Common Council, con- 
temporary with B. F. Doak, Joseph Davis and A. F. 
Breed; a member of the Water Board, and its Chairman 
for several years; Chairman of the Board of License 
Commissioners ; President of the Lynn Board of Trade : 
Member of the State Board of Trade; Director succes- 
sively of the Central National Bank, the Lynn National 
Bank, the First National Bank; The Security Safe De- 
posit and Trust Co. : Director and Treasurer of the Lynn 
Hospital ; Director of the Home for Aged Women ; Presi- 
dent of the Park and of the Oxford Clubs, and Trustee 
of the Unitarian Society. His services as an administrator 
and fiduciary trustee were frequently sought. 

Mr. Sweetser was married at the age of twenty-five by 
the Rev. Parsons Cooke to Mary Abby Chase, daughter of 
Philip Chase. Thev lived for manv years on the Chase 
estate on North Common Street, where the Public Library 



30 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

now stands. About the time the property passed to the 
City, the family moved to Baltimore; Street on land owned, 
since the settlement of Lynn, by William Bassett and his 
descendants. 

To benetlt his health, Mr. Sweetser \ isited Italy last 
winter and returning reached New York April 7, 1900. 
On the way to the railroad station from the steamship, he 
died suddenly of a heart complaint that his physicians had 
regarded as serious for several months. 

• In person, Mr. Sweetser was a little below the aver- 
age height A florid complexion and animated manner 
made him appear younger than his years*. The clear crisp 
language in which, he expressed himself was an indication 
of a mind clear and keenly perceptive, which, united with 
a broad public spirit, made him an excellent citizen and 
helpful member of societv. 

Honesty, industry, and fidelity to trust were the strong 
points in his character. In doing for others, he showed 
the same zeal and devotion as in doing for himself. A life 
as well spent as was his is worthy a record on these pages 
of our history. 



EBEXEZER KNOWLTON FOGG 



The subject of this sketch, was born in North wood, N. H., 
October 24, 1837, coming from good old Revolutionary 
ancestors, his grandfather having taken part in that 
struggle. He spent his early years in the schools of his 
native town, and the New Hampton Academy. 

When twenty years of age, he came to Lynn and 
eno-aged in shoemakin<{. Later, he engaged in the retail 
shoe business on Union Street with -his brother-in-law, 



.'"< 



EBENEZER KNOWLTON FOGG. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 3 1 

G. II. Batchekler, after which for two years he served as 
salesman for the well-known firm of Titus & Buckley. 

He was a life-long Republican, and was extremely 
active in the counsels and work of the party. A man of 
sound judgment, a kind, warm heart, great executive force, 
and the most unblemished character, he became prominent 
in Republican circles, and was honored by several offices 
by his constituents. 

In iSSS Mr. Fogg was elected to the Common Coun- 
cil, and in 18S9 and 1S90, he was in the Board of Alder- 
men, serving as President of the Board in the latter vear. 
During 1891 he served the City as its Mayor; his term 
was characterized by the same honesty and application to 
the best interests of the City as had been all other positions 
to which he had been called. He was elected to the Legis- 
lature of 1S06 and 1S97, serving on the Committee on 
Metropolitan Affairs. 

His term as Postmaster at Lynn began June 1, 189S ; 
he held the office until his death, nearly two years later. 
During his term of office the postal service in the city 
was greatly improved. Swampscott was added to the 
Lynn Postal District, and free delivery established in that 
town. Three sub-stations in Lynn were added to give the 
people better facilities for the transaction of their postal 
business. 

Mr. Fogg was a model husband and father. He was 
married January 5, 1S62, to Miss Fannie S. Batchekler of 
North wood, X. II., two children resulting from the union, 
Wilbert Kirkland, who died in 1898, and Bertha Grace, 
who with the widow, survives him. He died April 21, 
1900. 

Of social disposition, Mr. Fogg had long been promi- 
nent among the fraternal associations of the City. He 
I 



32 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

was a member of Golden Fleece Lodge of Free Masons, 
and was a charter member of East Lynn Lodge of Odd 
Fellows. He was an attendant at the First Universalist 
Church, Nahant Street. 



ANNA AMELIA HOOD 

Was born on February 27, 1832, in that portion of Lynn, 
now Nahant, in the second house built on the peninsula, 
occupied by her great-grandfather, Richard Hood, whose 
ancestors are traced to colonial days. The first Richard 
came from Lynn, England. 

Richard" held the office of Collector of Taxes. 
Richard" bought large tracts of land, and the ''Hood 
homestead " from Lady Humphrey, when she left the col- 
ony for England. At his death, he left a large propeily 
in land, houses, and household effects. 

Richard" moved to Nahant; Abner 3 , his son, had a 
son Benjamin 4 , who married Hannah Phillips of Swamp- 
scott. These were the father and mother of Amelia 5 . 
The Phillips family came from Pictou Castle, Wales, 
which estate remains to the present time in the Phillips 
family, Sir John Phillips being its present owner. The 
house in Swarnpscott, which passed out of the family 
many years ago, still stands, and is called " The Elms."' 
Both the Hoods and Phillips's were members of the 
Society of Friends., called Quakers. 

Amelia Hood was educated at the Lynn and Town- 
send Academies. From her father, Benjamin Hood, she 
inherited a keen sense of humor and ready wit. quick in 
repartee, which made her always a welcome guest ; from 
her mother, great decision of character, which, early left an 



/. 






ANNA A MRU A HOOD. 



,/' 



AMOS FRANKLIN BREED. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 33 

• 

orphan, enabled her to assume the business cares of the fam- 
ily, conducting affairs with an unusual amount of energy 
and ability. She was a woman of great appreciation of the 
graces of life. Cultivated travel had broadened a mind 
receptive to all the refining influences. She loved music, 
art and literature. Few women are equally loved and 
honored by a wider circle of friends and acquaintances. 
In friendship she was loyal, faithful and constant: her 
presence stood for usefulness, integrity, dignity, good 
cheer. Her charm of manner, simple directness of thought, 
keen sense of humor, combined with a calm, cheerful, and 
courageous nature, and ready sympathy, made her one of 
those loyal hearts who in life's battle firm doth stand, 

tv Shall bear hope's tender blossoms 
Into the silent land." 

She died April 27, 1900. 



AMOS FRANKLIN BREED. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Lynn, Octo- 
ber 15, 1830, and died May 22, 1900, spending his whole 
life in the town and city. His parents were Amos and 
Francis (Reed) Breed. He was a descendant of one of the 
earliest settlers of Lynn, Allen Breed, a farmer, who 
was born in 1601, and came to Lynn in 1630, and lived 
near where Summer Street crosses Western Avenue, and 
from him the vicinity where he resided was called Breed's 
End. 

Soon after passing through the public schools, Mr. 
Breed engaged in the shoe business, making a success, as 
he did in all his enterprises. For his courtesy, strict integ- 
rity and thorough business management, he was sought by 
3 



34 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

moneyed institutions, and in 1884. became President of 

the First National Bank, which position he held until his 
decease. He was also a Director and Vice President of 
the Lynn Institution for Savings, Vice President of the 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Co., and a Direc- 
tor of the Lvnn Gas and Electric Co. 

. His business ability in the management of the Lvnn 
and Boston Railroad Co., however, gave him his widest 
fame. He assumed this management when the stock was 
considered almost worthless, and by dint of the far-seeing 
policy which he inaugurated, made.it among the best in the 
Commonwealth. Extending its tracks in all directions, 
improving the rolling stock, and absorbing the Belt Line 
Road, the notice of investors was attracted, and the North 
Shore Traction Co. was formed, absorbing the Lynn and 
Boston and subsidiary branches. Mr. Breed was made 
President of the increased corporation, and renewed his 
former successes. On July 30, 1899, the system of the 
North Shore Traction Co. was bought by a company of 
Boston capitalists, and several other roads were combined 
with it under the name of the Massachusetts Electric Rail- 
ways Co., and of this Mr. Breed was made President, a 
worthy compliment to his policy and management. It has 
been truly said that " Lynn owes more to Mr. Breed than 
to any other man for the great development of its suburbs." 
He was a true citizen, and took an active interest in 
politics from his arrival at his majority. He was a life- 
long Republican, and in 1864 was elected to the Common 
Council, and was a member of the Board of Aldermen in 
1S65, 1866, 1867, 1868 and 1870. In 1865 and 1866, and 
also in 1876 he was elected to the Legislature, and in 1877 
and 1878, he was a member of the Senate, serving the lat- 
ter year as Chairman of the Committee on Street Railways. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



CO 



In j S96 he wa 5 elected a delegate to the national Republi- 
can convention. 

His public spirit and general worthiness have been 
recognized by the citizens, and he has been called upon to 
give In's services as Chairman of the Pine Grove Cemetery 
Commissioners nearly twenty years, and Commissioner of 
the city sinking funds. He was a generous giver to all 
forms of charity, and was always open to appeals for 
local enterprises. 

Mr. Breed married Mary A. Lindsey, of Lvnn, who, 
with two sons, Amos F. and Sylvester B. Breed, survive 
him. 



SAMUEL HENDERSON GREEN, 

Son of Samuel and Hannah (Boden) Green, was born in 
Lynn, October 24, 1850, and spent his whole life in this 
city. He was educated in our public schools. Then he 
engaged in the shoe finding business, in which he con- 
tinned until his death. 

He married Mary A., daughter of Ezra and Rosanna 
Wardwell of Lynn. She, with two children, Doctor 
Arthur W., who is a hospital steward in the Forty-sixth 
Regiment, U. S.V., now stationed in the Philippine Islands, 
and a daughter, Jennie B., survive him. 

Born in 1850, the year Lynn was made a city, he was 
invited to be an aid in the procession of May 15th, the day 
of the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the incor- 
poration of Lynn as a city. He was injured while mount- 
ing a horse in that procession. His death, on July 20, 
1900, was the result of the accident. 

He was a member of Bav State Lodge and Palestine 
Encampment, I. O. O. F., the Oxford Club, and of' the 



$6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Lynn Historical Society. He was an attendant at the First 
Universalist Church. 

Mr. Green was a genial, social man, honest and up- 
right in every respect. He made friends wherever he 
went. He was a very domestic man. Fond of his home, 
he surrounded it with everything to make it pleasant and 
attractive. A devoted husband and father, a useful mem- 
ber of society, his memory will be cherished by all who 
knew him. 



JOHN ELBRIDGE HUDSON 

Was born in Lynn, August 3, 1S39, anc ^ died at his 
summer home in Beverly, October 1, 1900. He was the 
son of John and Elizabeth C. (Hilliard) Hudson, and a 
lineal descendant of Thomas Hudson (of the family of 
Henry Hudson, the navigator), one of the planters of 
Lynn. He married August 23, 1S71, Eunice W. Healey, 
daughter of Wells and Elizabeth (Pickering) Healey of 
Hampton Falls, N. H. They had no issue. She survives 
him. 

Mr. Hudson's maternal great-grandfather was Rev. 
Samuel Hilliard, a pioneer in Universalism, and a soldier 
of the Revolution, who served at Bunker Hill and Ben- 
nington. His mother's maternal grandparents were Rev. 
Dr. David Hall, who preached in the Congregational 
Church at Sutton for sixty years, and Elizabeth (Prescott) 
Hall, daughter of Dr. John, and Rebecca (Bulkley) Pres- 
cott of Concord. 

Mr. Hudson's early training was in the Lynn public 
schools. He fitted himself for Harvard College, and was 
graduated in 1S62, the valedictorian of his class, summa 
cum laudc. He was the best Greek scholar of his class. 



., •• '•'"■'^;,, 



\ ; * : ! 



s : | 



/0//.V E LB RIDGE HUDSON. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 37 

and while still an under-gradnate was appointed to a Greek 
tutorship, an appointment unique in the history of the 
college. Tutoring was simply an avocation while he was 
preparing for his life work, which was to be law. He 
was graduated from Harvard Law School, in 1865, and 
was admitted to the Suffolk Bar, October 25, 1S66, when 
he entered the office oi Chandler, Shattuck & Thayer. 

In 1870, he became a partner in the. firm of Chandler, 
Thayer & Hudson, and later, Chandler, Ware & Hudson. 
In 1878, the firm was dissolved, and for two years Mr. 
Hudson continued alone. 

In 1880, Mr. Hudson became, general counsel for the 
American Bell Telephone Company, and devoted himself 
exclusively to its interests. In 18S5, he became general 
manager of the Company: in 18S7, Vice-President : and 
in 1SS9, President, which office lie held at the time of his 
death. In 18S7, he became President of the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company — -'The Long Dis- 
tance Company " — with which, in 1900, the Bell Company. 
was consolidated. During his direction as General Man- 
ager and President, the number of miles of telephone wire 
increased from 101,592 in 1SS5, to 1,016,777 in 1899; anc ^ 
the number of exchange connections from 272,478,705 in 
1S85, to 1,666,000,000 in 1899. 

Other elements enter into the estimate of a man's suc- 
cess or failure in life, but in this pushing age of ours it is 
perhaps not indelicate to say that this great corporation 
which Mr. Hudson managed so brilliantly put a higher 
value upon his annual services than any other man born in 
Lynn ever received. 

Mr. Hudson was a member of the corporation of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was Vice- 
President of the New England Historic-Genealogical 



3S LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Society, and a member of the following societies : Ameri- 
can Antiquarian Society, fellow of American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, British Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Bos- 
ton ian Society, Bar Association of the City of Boston, 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Virginia His- 
torical Society, and of the Lynn Historical Society. 

Mr. Hudson was a member of the Boston Art, St. Bo- 
tolph. Union, Algonquin, Exchange, and University Clubs. 

The ownership of some land on the banks of the 
Saugus River by the immigrant Thomas Hudson, and the 
discovery of bog iron ore, with the establishment there of 
the Iron Works, led to an incident in the life of John E. 
Hudson, which shows his keen interest in the ties of kin- 
ship, and attachment for his birthplace. 

The rude little iron kettle, which is now a priceless 
legacy of Lynn, is believed to have been the first casting 
made in America. It was made and given to Thomas 
Hudson, in consideration of release of claim to the land. 
It remained in possession of his descendants until it was 
presented to the City of Lynn, b}* John E. Hudson, Novem- 
ber 21, 1S92. 

Most men who achieve fame win it upon a single line. 
Mr. Hudson attained high rank in several widely differing 
ways. He was a profound student of Greek, and of Gre- 
cian history, with which he kept in touch to the last of his 
persistently busy life. 

As a lawyer, he was noted for his thoroughness of 
preparation, for his keen analysis of intricate points, and 
for his conscientious devotion to important interests in- 
trusted to him. 

His ceaseless studies developed the keen business tal- 
ent, so that when he came to the Telephone Company all 



fyS ' 



% 



■■'</ •'-'^- 






MARTHA LOUISE NEWffALL. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



his faculties were alert, and he became the master-mind 

of a great business. As scholar, as lawyer, and as busi- 
ness man, he was easily leader. 



MARTHA LOUISE NEWHALL 

Was born in Boston, Mass., April 28, 1S52, and died in 
Lynn, Mass., October 17, 1900. She was the daughter of 
Newell and Phebe Nourse. Both of her parents were direct 
descendants of the early settlers of this country, her father 
being a descendant of the famous Rebecca Nourse, and 
her mother was a descendant of the Shaw family. She 
was a woman of constant cheerfulness, always loyal to her 
friends, and of a kind and benevolent disposition. She 
had a very large circle of friends. She was educated in 
the public schools of Cambridge, " Lasell Seminary" of 
Auburndale, and Wesleyan Academy of Wilbraham, 
Mass. .She was a member of the Lynn Common M. E. 
Church, the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Glen Lewis Council 
of the Royal Arcanum, and of the Lynn Historical Society, 
in all of which she took a deep interest. She loved to be 
with, and was very devoted to her family. 

She was married to George H. Newhall of Lynn in 
Cambridge, Mass., January 17, 1872, by Rev. Ira G. Bid- 
well of the Harvard Street M. E. Church ; since that time 
she has resided in Lynn. She had two daughters, Loella 
and Lizzie Grace, who, with her husband, survive her. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON FLANDERS 

Was born August 6, 1808, at South Hampton, N. H., and 
died November 8, 1900, in Lynn, where he had resided 



40 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

for nearly seventy years. His parents were Parker Flan- 
ders and Tirzah Sawyer, both of whom were also natives 
of South Hampton. 

Mr. Flanders received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town. He came to Lynn in 1S29, 
and with the exception of a few years passed in Maine, 
has lived here ever since. Flis trade was that of a car- 
penter, and he worked for Ezekiel Parker, Benjamin 
Clifford and others, and later, in partnership with Joseph 
Gilman. He erected several large water wheels for mills 
in various parts of Xew England, and later, gave his atten- 
tion to the setting up of shoe machinery in Lynn. Mr. 
Flanders had great confidence in the growth of Lynn, 
buying and improving considerable real estate on what 
was formerly Beach Street. His frugal and industrious 
habits enabled him to retire from active work some years 
ago, but he did not cease to be active in his own affairs, 
and interested in local matters up to the time of his death. 
Mr. Flanders kept a diary from the year 1S25 to the time 
of his death, a record of personal and local events, inter- 
esting and of great value. 

Mr. Stephen Flanders, probably the first and only one 
of the name, came to America together with his wife Jane, 
between 1640 and 1646, settling in Salisbury, Mass. He 
died June 27, 16S4. ^ s wife died November 19, 1683. 

George W. Flanders was a descendant from the above 
in the sixth generation. He was married to Ruth L. 
Flanders (no relation) February 16, 1842. She was born 
August 28, 181 9, and died November 11, 1878, in Lynn. 

He leaves a son, Wendell Phillips Flanders of New- 
York City, and one daughter, Lizzie, wife of Edward 
Oliver Chase of Newark, N.J. 



'?. % 



.... I 






V 



GEORGE WASHINGTON ELAND ERS. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 41 

EDWARD MAURY RUSSELL 

who died at the Lynn Hospital, on November 14, 1900, 
from injuries received from the collision of his bicycle 
with a heavy team, was born in Dedham, Mass., on 
. January 3, 1857. Little is known of his family ancestry, 
excepting that his father's family came from Connecticut, 
and his mother's family from England. 

He moved from Dedham to Jamaica Plain when a very 
young boy, and moved to Lynn about 1S70. In Lynn, he 
was for many years connected with the L. A. May Co., a 
I . large household furnishing store, afterwards was a col- 

lector for different business houses, and at the time of his 
death held a position in the Lynn office of the General 
Electric Company. He was a member of the Oxford Club 
and of the Lynn Historical Society. He was much inter- 
ested in church and charitable work, and was always ready 
to make himself useful when needed. He was one of the 
early members of St. Stephen's Episcopal vested boy 
choir, and for three years was President of the Choir 
Guild, an association of those who had been connected 
with the choir. As librarian of the Sunday-school, and in 
many other ways, he gave freely of his time to St. 
Stephen's Church. During the active existence of the Lynn 
Boys' Club he was greatly interested in its welfare, and 
was also active in assisting; in the work of obtaining money 
for the Lvnn Hospital in the arrangements for Hospital 
Da}*. Genial, generous, wherever he was found he was 
conscientious, useful and faithful. A brother, William R. 
Russell of New York, is his remaining near relative. No 
recent photograph of Mr. Russell is in the possession of 
any of his friends, and cannot be presented in connection 
with this sketch. 



42 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

WILLIAM FRANCIS HILL, 
Who died in Lynn. 'December 16, 1900, was a descendant 
in the seventh generation, .from John Hill of England, .who 
settled in Dorchester in the seventeenth century. His 
father was Deacon Philip Ellis Hill, and his mother Louisa 
Packard (Leach) Hill, both of whom were born in Bridge- 
water. His maternal ancestor was Giles Leach of Eng- 
land, who came to Bridge water in 1656. The subject of 
this sketch was born in Bridgewater, Mass., September 26, 
1827. His father was a farmer, and he followed that 
honorable calling until he came to Lynn, in 1865. Here 
he associated himself with a brother of his wife, Edward 
M. Farnsworth, in the shoe-finding business. Later, he 
was in company with the late L.- B. Russell, under the 
name of Russell & Hill, then in business with Hill Broth- 
ers, and finally as head of the firm of Wm. F. Hill & Co. 
The}' were located on Exchange Street at the time of the 
great fire in Lynn, and suffered with others in the destruc- 
tion of their property. Relocating on Suffolk Street, he 
continued the business until his fatal illness, which, how- 
ever, was of comparatively short duration. 

William F. Hill belonged to the conservative class of 
business men, who are always relied upon for their strict 
integrity, and honest dealing. What he said could be 
believed, and what he promised he always fulfilled. With 
no political aspirations, he was ever faithful to that duty 
of the citizen, which consists in expressing by his ballot 
his consent to the authority of those who were chosen to 
rule in public affairs. 

Deacon Hill had fine taste for music, and in the palmy 
days of the Lynn Choral Union he was one of the most 
enthusiastic members. 












. 



■ 



.>"•■■■ .. 






, •■' 






Site, 



WILLIAM FRANCIS HILL 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 43 

Socially, William F. Hill was a warm and faithful 
friend. His friends loved him because his love for them 
was never stinted, and it spoke not only from Ids lips, but 
from his eves, and in the smile that never failed to light 
up his kindly countenance. 

His religious home was in the Baptist Church, and he 
was for the greater part of his life in fellowship with that 
communion. On coming to Lynn, he joined the High 
Street Baptist Church, but in 1874, he with others with- 
drew and formed the East Baptist Church, becoming one 
of its deacons, in which office he continued until his death. 
No higher tribute can be paid to his integrity than the 
statement that for nearly twenty-live years he was the 
honored Treasurer of the Church. 

On November 22, 1855. ne was united in marriage 
with Susan Thayer Farnsworth, daughter of Rev. James 
D. Farnsworth of Bridgewater, Mass. Five children were 
the fruit of this union, three of whom, George B., Char- 
lotte F., and Mrs. Susan Francis Green, survive. 

Deacon Hill was a member of the Houghton Horti- 
cultural Society, the Essex Congregational Club, the 
Lynn Historical Society, and the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 



44 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



M EMBERS. 



April 27, 1897. Abbott, Waldo Lovejoy 25 Hanover St. 

il Aborn, Charles Henry Swampscott 

March'26, 1901. Aid worth, Eliza A 394 Walnut St. 

Jan. 28, 1398. Allen, Lillie B. ........ . 120 South Common St. 

April 27, 1897. Allen, Walter. B. 2 Walden St. 

July 29, 1901. Allen. Eliza M 2 Walden St. 

April 27, 1897. At twill, Alfred Mudge Kensington Square 

" Atwood, Luther . . . S Sagamore St. 

Nop. 23, 1S99. Babcock, Bessie B 48 Breed St. 

April 27, 1897. Bacheller, Edward F 40 Broad St. 

Sept. 9, 1898. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2743 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

April 27, 1897. Baker, Frederick E 189 Lewis St. 

March IS, 1S99. Baker, Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St. 

" Baker, Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean St. 

March 12, ; 1900. Barker, Ralph E 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1897. Barney, Charles Xeal 103 Green St. 

" Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

" Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 28, 1S9S. Bartlett, Ella Doak 01 Atlantic St. 

Oct. 18, 1S97. Bartlett, Hannab II . 115 Xahant St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Bartlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 27, 1899. Bazzoni, Mary A 28 Elsmere Place 

June 1,1897. Beal, Adeline Brown . . . 89 Broad St. 

March. 20, 1901. Beard, Cordelia M. E 389 Essex St. 

i; Beard, Daniel Breed 389 Essex St. 

March 8, 1901. Bennett, George Edwin 44 Ireson Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Bennett, Josiah Chase 78 Beacon Hill Ave. 

•' Bennett, Larkin Everett 258 Gibson St., Lowell 

March 8, 1901, Bennett. Mary Eugenia Pearl 44 Ireson Ave. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Berry, Benjamin Hun 238 Ocean St. 

June 9, 1899. Berry, John W 105 Franklin St. 

" Berry, Susannah W 105 Franklin St. 

March 27, 1900. Bessom, William B 44 Elsmere Place 

N&ti. 24, 1897. Bliss, George S . 24 Chase St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 45 

Oct. 2& 1S9S. Blood, E-kteedge H 157 Maple St. 

March S, 1001. Bramerd, Albion H. . 53 Xahant St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Breed. Adelaide L 17 Xahant St. 

Dec. 28, 1S09. Breed. Caroline A. . 61 Xewhall St. 

MarchtQi 1901. Breed, Charles Orrin 54 Elm St. 

Oct 11, 1899. Breed. Clara E 40 Xahant Place 

June 1, 1S97. Breed, Emma Hawthorne ....... . 114 Green St. 

.4p.rfl 26, 1000. Breed, Florence L 22 Breed St. 

Nov. 2s. 1890. Breed', France? Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 

Oct. 11, lS9t. Breed. Frank M 40 Xahant Place 

Nov. 2S, 1800. Breed. George Albert 52 Baltimore St. 

March2J, 1900. Breed. George Hersehel 40 Xahant Place 

April 27, 1807. Breed. George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

il Breed, Henry W 48 Xahant St. 

" Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Xahant St. 

March 26, 1901. Breed, Lilla M 54 Elm St. 

March 8, 1001. Breed, Marietta 41 Franklin St. 

Feb. 9, 1809. Breed. Mary E 47 Commercial St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Breed. S. Estelle 118 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

" Breed, Stephen Love joy 15 Xewhall St. 

Breed, 'Warren Mudge 22 Breed St. 

March 18, 1899. Bresnahan, Maurice V. 128 Chestnut St. 

April 27, 1897. Brigham, Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

" *Brown, Joseph Goold So Green St. 

<; Brown, Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

" Bubier, Frederick L 23 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1809. Bubier, Harriott Mudge . 1S5 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1897. Bubier, Joanna Attwill . ..... . 172 Washington St. 

" Bubier, Mary Adelaide 207 Ocean St. 

" Bubier, Mary A 207 Ocean St. 

• " Bubier, Xathan G. . . Swampscott 

'* Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267 Ocean St. 

Bubier, Sylvester II., 2d 172 Washington St. 

;; Buft'iim. Charles 450 Union St. 

March 18. 1809. Bilker, Frank Emery 25 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1S97. Buliineli, Charles F 184 Lewis St. 

" Burrill, Abby M 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, John Irving 23 Xahant Place 

" Burrill, William A. . . 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill, William Stocker 23 Xahant Place 

April 29, 1901. Burrows, Helen 1 196 Washington St. 

Jan. 17, 1000. Burrows, Joseph E 196 Washington St. 



<\6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

3Carc7^26, 190i. Caldwell, Sarah M. X 23 Caldwell Crescent 

April 27, 1897. Carleton, Joseph G. S. . . .. 15 Ocean Terrace 

Feb. 9, 189.9.. Chaee, Maria Rachel 185 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1S97. Chadwell, George II 192 South Common St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Chadwick, Ida F 7 Franklin St. 

Cbadwick, Sarah F 7 Franklin St. 

Feb* 2, 1901. Chase, Alice F 47 Baltimore St. 

March 12, 1900. Chase, Ellen S 24 Chase St. 

" Chase, Frederick S. . . 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1S97. Chase, Percy Brookline, Mass. 

" Chase, Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

" Clark, Charles Edward SO Broad St. 

dough, Charles Bartlett 39 Cherry St. 

" • Clough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 

" Clough, Mieajah Pratt 253 Ocean St. 

3/«rc/i20, 1901. Cobb, Bessie Brown 4 Washington Square 

' ; Cobb, Carol us M 4 Washington Square 

March S, 1901. Colbum, Clifton SO Xahant St. 

Oct. 11, 1S99. Comey, Henry Newton . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Oct. 20, 1900. Conner, Adalaide M 27 Sagamore St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Cox, Frank P 211 Ocean St. 

Feb. :2, 1901. Cox. May Yaughan . . . . .211 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Cross, Alfred 14 Chase St. 

" Cross, Charles A 8 Chase St. 

March 27, 1900. Currier, Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

April 26, 1900. Darcy, Alice M 54 Commercial St. 

April 27, 1S97. Darcy, John W . 54 Commercial St. 

July 23, 1S99. Davis, Lydia C 34 Baltimore St. 

Dec. 24, 1S9S. Dow, Charles L . . 265 Boston St. 

March 18, 1899. Dunn, Anna Lincoln .22 Portland St. 

March 8. 1901. Dnrland. Henrietta 83 Chestnut St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Dwyer, Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

April 27, 1897. Earle, Anthony 110 Henry Ave. 

;; Earle, Louise Snow 110 Henry Ave. 

March 18, 1399. Earle, Mabel . 110 Henry Ave. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Emerson, Philip 9 Beede Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Faulkner, Walter 33 Endicott St. 

March 12, 1900. Fenton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

July 28, 1899. French. Hartwell S 1 Atlantic St. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 47 

I 

April 27. ISO,'. *Fry. Clunks Coffin 11 1 Laighton St. 

Fuller, Addie G 26 Vine St. 

; ' Fuller, Charles Svlvester 2G Vine St. 



" Galloupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

" Galloupe, Lydia Ellis 10 Park St. 

" Garrison. William Lloyd Boston 

July 28, 1899. Goldthwait, Martha E IS Portland St. 

April 27, 1897. Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St., Salem 

" Goodell, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Goodridge, Charles Sewell •. . . 79 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1897. Goodridge. Gertrude May 5 Preseott Place 

March S, 1901. Goodridge, Micajah X 109 High Rock Ave. 



Marchl2] 1900. Goodwin, Daniel W 92 Newhall St. 

Dec. 24, 1898. Gove, William H 2.34 Lafayette St., Salem 

April 27, 1897. Giahani, George Herbert 62 Commercial St. 

" Graves, Isaiah Ill Fayette St. 

" Green, Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Green, Mary A 1 Fayette Place 

Oct. 26, 1900. Green, Jennie B 1 Fayette Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Greene, Bobert H S69 Summer St. 

" Greene, Susan A. . 369 Summer St. 

" Grover, Charles S. 16 Grover St. 

April 27, 1897. Guilford. Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

-You. 23, 1899. Gutterson, Annie M 912 Western Ave. 

" Gutterson, Eliza C 912 Western Ave. 

" Gutterson, Emily X 912 Western Ave. 



April 27, 1S97. Hacker, Sallie II 201 Ocean St. 

March 26, 1901. Harney, Elizabeth . 73 Baker St. 

April 7, 1S99. Halliday, Marion 35 King's Beach Terrace 

Dec. 28, 1899. Ilallowcll, Caroline A 42 Hanover St. 

April/21. 1897. Ilaunan, Joseph F 36 Bogers Ave. 

" Harmon, Maria B 89 X"orth Common St. 

" Harmon, Kollin E 89 Xorth Common St. 

" Harris, Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 28, 1899. Hastings, Charles II 163 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremont St. 

May 20, 1S9S. Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

April 27, 1897. Hawks, Esther II 10 Xfewhall St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hayes, Amy Augusta 43 Eastern Ave. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Hayes, Elihu B 43 Eastern Ave. 



48 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



April 27, 1897. Heath, Caroline Putnam 132 South Common St. 

Heath-,- Henry Warren 109 Hollingsworth St. 

July 28, 1S99. Henderson. Abby M 79 Xahant St. 

March IS. IS99. Herbert, George C 17 Chatham St. 

Sept. 9, 189?. Hill, Alfred C. East Saugus 

MarchBQ, 1901. Hill. Charlotte Farnsworth 14 Summer Place 

" Hill, George Barnum 120 Lewis St. 

April 21, 1897. Hill, Sfisan T 14 Summer Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hilliard, Alma V 11 New Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 1G Henry Ave. 

" Hilton. Eliza A 10 Henry Ave. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hixon, Lucilla D 65 Baker St. 

" Hixon, Warren S. . . . ., 65 Baker St. 

April 27. 1S99. Hitcllings, James W. 21 Wave St. 

March 27, 1900. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Holder, William C 12 Park St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Holmes, Lucy T G7 North Common St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Hood, Julia Pond 18 Sachem St. 

April 27, 1897. Houghton, John Clarkson 29 Vine St. 

Feb. 20, 1900. Houghton, Maria L . 33 Breed St. 

Kov. 28, 1899. Houghton, S. Ellen 1 Light St. 

April 27, 1897. Howe, Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

April 27, 1899. Huntington. Alice B 181 Allen Ave. 

Jan. 2S, 1S98. Hunt, D. Gage . . 142 Maple St. 

Dec. 14, 1898. Ingalls, Edwin W 9S Laighton St. 

April 27, 1S97. Ingalls, Emma F 229 Ocean St. 

" Ingalls, J. Fred G05 Western Ave. 

Ingalls. James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

May 20, 1898. Ingalls, Mary Mower 189 Essex St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Ingalls, Robert Collyer 229 Ocean St. 

April 7, 1899. Ireson, Samuel S .. 170 South Common St, 

Feb. 20, 1900. James. Frank M 127 Xahant St. 

JYoc. 24, 1897. Johnson, Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Andrew Dudley .... Winter St., East Saugus 

" Johnson, Anna L .55 Atlantic St. 

" Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Newhali 109 Xahant St. 

" Johnson, David X" 101 Newhali St. 

" Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 49 

April 7. 1809. Johnson, Emma Burt 101 Xewhall St. 

April 27, 1607. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

'" Johnson, Henry W. . OS South Common St. 

April 7, 1S99. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop 1S1 North Common St. 

April 27, 1807. Johnson, Luther S. .' 226 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1897. Johnson, Lydia Hacker . . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

Dec. 28, 1900. Johnson, Maria L 62 Mall St. 

xipril 7, 1800. Johnson, Mary May 220 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S07. Johnson, Virginia Newhall 100 Nahant St. 

" Keene, Frank ..." 17 Atlantic St. 

Nov. 23, 1890. Keene, William Gerry . . . . . . . . 11 Grosvenor Park 

March IS, 1800. Keith, Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

March2&, 1901. Keith, Ira B 84 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1S97. Kenney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

Oct. 11. 1899. Kent, Harriet Marshall 112 Green St. 

Jan. 10, 1000. Kimball, Frank W 120 Washington St. 

April 27, 1807. Kimball, Kufus 54 Harwood St. 

Jan. 10, 1000. Kimball, Sylvia II 120 Washington St. 

April 27, 1807. Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

June 1, 1807. Hamper, Sarah E. . 16 King's Beach Terrace 

March 12, 1900. Lee, Caroline S. . 13 West Baltimore St. 

" Lee, Isehemiah 13 West Baltimore St. 

Dec. 20, 1000. Lewis, Carrie Shillaber 31 Burrill Ave. 

May 20, 180S. Lewis, Charles W. . . . 140 Lewis St, 

April 27, 1807. Lewis, Jacob Meek 8 Fayette St. 

Jan. 27, 1800. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

" Little, William B 4 Nahant, cor. Broad St. 

April 7, 1809. Littlefield, Horatia A. 35 Franklin St. 

April IS, 1898. Littlefield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

April 7, 1800. Littlefield, William Bradbury 35 Franklin St. 

Sept. 4, 1000. Loring, John L 27 Violet St. 

May 20, 1808. Lummus, Henry Tilton 4 Hudson St. 

April 20, 1000. Lummus, Lucinda M 43 Cherry St. 

April 27, 1897. Lummus, William W 43 Cherry St. 

" Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

" Mansfield, Perley B 10 Nichols St. 

Nov. 23, 1800. Marsh, George E. .. 12 Treson Ave. 

" Marsh, James M 12 Ire^on Ave. 

M arch S* T9QL Martin, Angie P 388 Summer St. 

4 



50 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

March 12, 1900. Murtm, Augustus B. IT High Rock' Aye. 

April 27, 1897. Martin, George Henry SSS Summer St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Martin, Jam.es. P 24 Sachem St. 

ylpn'/ 27, 1S07. Matthews, Harriet L. 42 Hanorer St. 

June 1, 1S97, McArthur, Annie E 07 North Common St. 

April.2Q } 1900. Mclntire, Frederick M. . . . 1600 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

3/arcA 27, 1S97. Merrill, Albert K 9 Henry Ave. 

" Merrill, Harriet E 9 Henry Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Moore, Arthur Seudder 54 Mall St. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Moore, Julia J 72 Fayette St. 

Jan. T7,,1900. Morse, M. Louise 369 Summer St. 

April 27, 1897. Moulton, Daniel B 36 Sagamore St. 

" Moulton, James T 12 Carnes St. 

" Moulton, Katherine R. . 71 Federal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus . . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

" Mower, Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

Jan. 29, 1900. Mudge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

April 27, 1S97. Mudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 G.reystone Park 

Dee. 28, 1900. Mudge, Pamelia B . 115 Green St. 

Mullin, James D 58 Xewhall St. 

Jan. 28, 1S98. Mullin, Sarab Abhy 58 Xewhall St. 

March 26, 1901. Xeai, Lydia C 1022 Washington St. 

April 21, 1897. Neal, Peter Morr ell 1022 Washington St. 

" Xeal, William E. 1022 Washington St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Xeill, Charles F 17 Bassett St_ 

" Xeill, Eliza J 17 Bassett St. 

March 2 6, 1901. Xewhall, Annie Louise 72 Broad St. 

July 28, 1899. Xewhall, Annie Pepperell 305 Essex: St. 

April 27, 1897. Xewhall, Asa Tarhell 489 Lynn field St. 

" Xewhall, Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Xewhall, Frances H 10 Deer Park 

Feb. 20, 1900. Xewhall, Francis S IS Baltimore St. 

March 27, 1900, Newhall, George H 343 Chatham St, 

April 27, 1897. Xewhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

Feb. 2, 1901. Xewhall, Hattie C. 23 Atlantic St. 

April 27, 1897. Xewhall, Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

" Xewhall, Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

" . Xewhall, James Silver 132 South Common St. 

" Xewhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

11 Xewhall, Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

" Xewhall, Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

" Xewhall, Marion Wentworth . . . 132 South Common St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Kl 

I 

Jan. 11, 1S99. Xewhall. Mary Elizabeth G9 Newhall St. 

April 27, 1S97. Xewhall, Sarah Effie 19 Park St. 

" Newhall, Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantic St. 

Newhall. Terry Afden 09 Xewhall St. 

" Xewhall, Wilbur Fisk ... 74 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

11 Xewhall, William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

" Nichols, Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

" Nichols, Frank Herbert 410 Summer St. 

" Nichols, Fred ITammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7, 1S99. Xichols, Fred M 15 Essex Court 

April 27, 1S97. Xichols, Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

" Xichols. Thomas Parker 11 Prospect St. 

Dec. 24, ISPS. Xorthrup, Arthur J 20 Baker St. 

" Xorthrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

Feb. 2, 190.1. Norton, Joseph C 30 Grove St. 

" Norton. Sarah S 30 Grove St. 

April 7, 1S99. Xoyes, Mary A 235 Summer St. 

Marchm, 1901. O'Keefe, Mary A 414 Broadway 

April 27, 1897. Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Oliver, Rachel Louise 99 Beacon Hill Ave, 

July 29, 1901. Osborne, Archer Preble G94 Western Ave. 

June 1, 1S97. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 

Jan. 29, 1900. Parke, Emma F .... 30 Xahant Place 

April 20, 1900. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillips Ave. 

Oct. 20, 1900. Parker, Harriet Fitts 2S Lowell St. 

April 27. 1S97. Parker, John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. 11, 1899. Parrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 

I " Parsons, Katharine M 100 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1S97. Parsons, Mary A Lynnfield Centre 

" Patten, Frank Warren 370 Summer St. 

" Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Paul, John M 9 Farrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F 9 Farrar St. 

" Peirce, Charles Francis 42 Hanover St. 

Oct. 11, 1S99. Percival, Mary E 79 North Common St. 

April 27, 1S97. Pevear, Henry A 159 Washington St. 

March 10, 1S9S. Pevear, Mary F. 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

April 27, 1897. Pevear, Sarah E 159 Washington St. 

Dec. 24, 1898. Pevear, Waldo L 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Feb. 9, iS99. Phillips, Anna Paeillia 35 Bassett St. 

April 27, 1S97. Phillips, Arthur John 35 Bassett St. 



52 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Jan. 27, 1809. Phillips, Sarah E 21 Lewis St. 

April '-'7, 1 SOT. Pickford, Anna M 10(3 Washington St. 

" Pinkham, Emily G 04 Nahant St. 

Nov. 23, 1899. Pool, Howard F 72 Johnson St. 

Dec. 28, .1000. Pool, Lena B 72 Johnson St. 

April IS, 1808. Porter, Bertha Currier 101 Fayette St. 

" Porter, Margaret Ellen 101 Fayette St. 

April 27, 1807. Porter, Thomas Freeman 274 Summer St. 

April 7, 1899. Prichard, Charles F 17 Sagamore St. 

April 27, 1807. Putnam, Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

" Putnam, Hannah V . . . . . 40 Fayette. St. 

" Richards, James II 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, '1899. Robinson, Elizabeth F 47 Commercial St. 

June 1, 1807. Robinson, William Pitt . 1730 17th St., Washington, U.C. 

March 12, 1000. Rogers, Abraham L. . - . .311 West 97th St., New York 

" Rogers, Emmelyn S. . . . 311 West 07th St , New York 

April 27, 1807. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

July 28, 1899. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

" Rowell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road 

April 27, 1807. Rule, Elizabeth E 80 Franklin St. 

May 20, 1898. Ruppel, Emil F 120 South Common St. 

" Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 

Jan. 17, 1900, Sanborn, Charles S. ' 18 King St. 

April 27, 1807. Sanderson, Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

" Sargent, William P 151 Chestnut St. 

" Sawyer, Henry A 243 Boston St. 

" Sears, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

" Sheldon, Chauncey C 49 North Common St. 

u . Sheldon, May L 40 Xorth Common St. 

May 13, 1901. Shorey, Martha H 70 High Ruck St. 

44 Shorey, Susan E 70 High Rock St.' 

" Silsbee, Henry 38 Brookline St. 

March 12, 1900. Silsbee, Lillian L . 60 Breed St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Silsbee, Louise E 118 Green St, 

March 12, 1900. Silsbee, K. Everett 60 Breed St. 

Jan. 28, 1898. Smith, Joseph X 232 Ocean St. 

Sept. 9V1898. Smith, Sarah F. 232 Ocean St, 

April 21, 1897. Spinney, Benjamin F . 270 Ocean St. 

" Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 



LV.NN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. J3 

April 27, 1897. Sprague,, Benjamiu 145 Ocean St. 

" Sprague, Henry Hived .... Walker Road, Swampscott 

April 7, 1899. Stetson, Helen Louise 18 Sachem St. 

March 20 t 1901.' Stevens, Adeline 152 Washington St. 

Dec. 2S, 1900. Steven-, Gertrude W 100 Johnson St. 

" Stevens. Maurice A 100 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1897. Stewart, Samuel Barrett, 141 Ocean St. 

M ay 20, 1898. Stiinpson, Isahelle Bradford 24 Sachem St. 

Nati. 24, 1897. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

April 27, 1897. Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

Oct. 11, 1899. Sw'eetser, Mary Abhy 55 Baltimore St. 

Jan., 10, 1900. Sweetser, Mary Anna . . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

Feb, 2, 1901. *Symonds, Annie W 57 Xahant St. 

April 27, 1897. Symonds, Walter E 57 Xahant St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Syniomls, Warren L 57 Xahaiit St. 

April 27, 1897. Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

" Tapley, Henry Fuller 2S0 Ocean St. 

" Tapley, Ida J 2S0 Ocean St. 

" Tarbox, James E 102 Federal St. 

Dec. 2S, 1 POO. Tebbetts, Georgiana B . 37 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 17, 1000. Tebbetts, Kate P 23 Wentworth Place 

Dec. 2S, 1000. Tebbetts, Theodore C 37 Baltimore St, 

Sept. 9, 1898. Tillman, Hannah Dixon 174 Broadway 

June 1, iS9t. Tirrell, Sarah E South Weymouth, Mass. 

April 27, 1S97. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence. 62 Xahant St. 

March 27, 1900. Tripp, Thaxter X 11 Baltimore St. 

" Tucker, Bertha B 44 Hamilton Ave. 

" Tucker, Emma A -44 Hamilton Ave. 

April 27, 1S97. Usher, Edward rreston Grafton, Mass. 

" Van Buren, James Heartt .... San Juan, Porto Pico. 

Not. 23, 1899. Vogel, Frederick M 54 Elm St. 

July 28, 1899. .Walter, Mary E 2729 Prairie Ave., Chicago, HI. 

Jan. 11, 1899. Warner, Ellen L 17. Baltimore St. 

" Warner, John G 17 Baltimore St. 

March! 2, 1000. Watrons, Grace-Greenwood Schenectady, X.Y. 

April 27, 1S97. Waiters, William 20 Sonth Common St. 

" Whitman, Joseph Henry 10 Sherman Terrace 

May 20, 1S9S. Whitman, Mary Ashcroft . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April 27, 1897. Williams, George. Hamilton, Woodland Ave., Swampscott 



54 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

MarchS, 1901. Wilson, Alice X. 22 Henry Ave. 

March 12, 1000. Wilson, Faustina Chadwell 423 Summer St. 

Nov. 23, 1S99. Witherell, Eunice Smith 22 Portland St. 

April 27, 1897. Witherell, Ivers L 22 Portland St. 

Wood, Lana J 19 Franklin St. 

" Woodbury, Charles J. II 01 Commercial St. 

Dec. 22, 1807. Woodbury, Jennie Russell .00 Atlantic Terrace 

April 27, 1S97. Woodbury, John 00 Atlantic Terrace 

" Woodbury, John P Boston 

April 20, 1900. Woodbury, AJ aria B 01 Commercial St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Young, Annah. A 19 Garland St, 

" Young, Elbridge S 19 Garland St. 

March 20, 1901. Young, Herbert W '. . . 85 North Common St. 



* Deceased since 1901 Annual Meeting-. 



&K. 









I 




il 

? vi / 






ex. 



IE REGISTER 



ym\ Historical Society, 



LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS, 



rOR Till: YI:A~R 190 



3^J 















3ay 



LYNX. MASS. 

UJIIT1EN & CASs. PRIMERS. 
IQ02. 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1902. 



President. 

BENJAMIN N. JOHNSON. 

Vice-President. 

GEORGE H. MARTIN. 

Treasurer. 

EUGENE A. PUTNAM. 

Recording Sec ret a ry . 

HOWARD MUDGE NEWHALL 

Co n esf>o n ding S e c ret a ry . 

WILLIAM S. BURRILL. 



6. /< 



. MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL. 

Benjamin N. Johnson. Charles II. Newhall. 

George 11. Martin. Howard Mudge Newiiall. 

Georce S. Bliss. James S. Newiiall. 

William S. Blrrill. John L. Parker. 

Philip A. Chase. Charles F. Plirce. 

Nathan M. Hawkes. Eugene A. Putnam. 

Reels Kimball. Henry F. Talley 

Earl A. Mower. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



COMMITTEES. 



Custodians. 

William S. Burrill. Earl A. Mower. 

George S. Bliss. Charles F. Peirce. 

Henry N« Comey. 



Finance. 

Philip A. Chase. Eugene A. Putnam. 

Luther S. Johnson. Henry B. Sprague. 



To Secure Publication of Old Town Records. 

Nathan M. Hawkes, Rollin E. Harmon. 

Philip A. Chase. John Woodbury. 



To Procure Information from Elderly Citizens. 

Charles Buffi m. David N.Johnson. 

S. Oliver Breed. Henry W.Johnson. 

Samuel A. Guilford. James II. Richards. 

Isaac K. Harris. William P. Sargent 

George C. Herbert. William Stone. 



Lectures and Public ^Meetings. 

Henry F. Tapley. Mary F. Little. 

William S. Burrill. George II. Martin. 

Harriet K. Clough. Charles II . Newhall. 

Micajah P. Clough. Howard Midge Newhall. 

Louise S. Earle. May L. Sheldon. 
Sallie H. Hacker. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Genealogy. 



John L. Parker. Enoch S. Johnson. 

Joanna A. Busier. Melissa J. Littlefield. 

Harriet K. Clough. Harriet L. Matthews. 

Nathan M. IIawkks. Sarah S. Norton. 

Susan T. Mill. Mary A. Parsons. 

John C. Houghton. Hannah V. Putnam. 

Anna L. Johnson. Warren E. Symoxds. 



Publication* and Printing. 

Howard Mudge Newilvll. Henry F. Tapley. 

Nathan M. II.wvkes. John O- Warner. 

James S. Newhall. 

Photography. 

George S. Bliss. "Charles A. Cross. 

Edward F. Bacheller. John W. Darcy. 

Collection of Historical Relics. 

Henry N. Co.mey. Mary A. Parsons. 

Emma H. Breed. Charles F. Peirce. 

Stephen L. Breed. Anna R. Phillies. 

Sallie IE Hacker. Arthur J. Phillips. 

Caroline P. Heath. Ida J. Tapley. 

Marking Ilistorici I Locations. 

Reels Kimball. Richard J. Nichols. 

Isaac F. Galloupe. John L. Parker. 

Arthur B. Mudge. James IE Richards. 

Necrology. 

Nathan: M. Hawkes. Israel A. Newhall. 

Rufus Kimball. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

George IE Martin. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Compilation of Local 'History. 

Nathan M. IIwvkf.s. Harriet L. Matthews. 

John C. Houghton. Israel A. Newhall. 

Benjamin X. Johnson. Wilbur F. Newhall. 

David N. Johnson Mary A. Parsons. 

George II. Martin. Elizabeth E. Rule. 



Geology and Botany. 

Albion Half: Brainard. Henry W. Heath. 

Lillie I>. Allen. Henry T. Lummus. 

Luther Atwood. James M. Marsh. 

Charles Xeai. Carney. M. Elizabeth Newhall 

Elmer F. Dwyer. Myra D. Allen Ruppel 

Mabel Earls. Chauncky C. Sheldon. 

Philip Emerson. S. Clarence Tozzer. 



Reception. 

Sallie H. Hacker. Virginia N.Johnson. 

Ella D. Bartlett. Kittie M. Newhall. 

M. Nellie Bubier. • Marion W. Newhall. 

IvYiDiA C. Davis. Katharine M. Parsons. 

Anna L. Dunn. Sarah F. Smith. 

Addie G. Fuller. Sarah S. Spinney. 

Maria B. Harmon. Ida J. Tapley. 

Caroline P. Heath. Ellen L. Warner. 

Mary M. Johnson Jennie R. Woodbury. 
and Members of the Council* 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



BY-LAW S. 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Membership shall consist of the present members of 
the voluntary association known as the Lynn Historical 
Society, of the signers of the agreement of association, 
and such persons as shall hereafter be elected bv the Coun- 
cil. The Council shall have authority to drop members 
from the rolls for non-payment of dues for two years. 

ARTICLE II. 

MEETINGS. 

The annual meeting shall be held on the second 
Wednesday evening in Januarv, time and place to be deter- 
mined by the Council. Twenty members shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business. A less number 
may adjourn. Special meetings may be called by direc- 
tion of the Council, or President, and shall be called upon 
the written request of twenty members. 



ARTICLE III. 

CO U NC 1 L. 

There shall be elected by ballot annually a Council of 
fifteen. The Council shall have the entire executive con- 
trol and management of the affairs, property, and finances 
of the Society, and shall carry out all its votes. The 
Council shall appoint all committees for special work, and 
all subordinate officers and agents, and make all necessary 



rules and regulations for itself and them. 



» LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

ARTICLE IV. 
OFFICERS. 

The Officers shall consist of President, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and 
Treasurer, who shall be elected annually by ballot, from 
the members of the Council. They shall perform the 
usual duties of such officers, and such other duties as the 
Council may require. 

ARTICLE V. 

DUES. 

The admission fee shall be one dollar, and the annual 
assessment shall be two dollars, payable on July first of 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AMENDMENTS. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meetino- 
regidarly called, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



THE MEETING-HOUSE 

Of the Third Parish in Lynn or of the i: Society of the Proprietors of the 

new Meeting-house in the western end of the town of Lvnn." 



The historical sketch of the old Meeting-house was contributed by 
Hon. Nathas Mortimer Hawkes. 



Up to 17S2 what is now the town of Lynnfield con- 
stituted the North or Second Parish of Lynn. In that 
year Lynnfield was set off from the town as a District. 
SubsequentH* the Saugus Parish was known as the Second 
Parish of Lvnn instead of the Third. 

"The Society of Proprietors of the New Meeting- 
house in the Western end of the Town of Lvnn" was the 
name of what later became the Meeting-house of the 
Third Parish of Lynn. 

It was built by the people of the west end of the town 
as proprietors because the First Parish successfully opposed 
the setting up of a new parish. 

The same arguments were used as in the case of the 
North or Lynnfield parish, namely, distance and incon- 
venience of travelling down to worship in the old parish 
meeting-house on the Common. 

The movement to secure a separate place of worship 
took definite form when William Taylor on Julv 1, 1736, 
conveyed to Thomas Cheever, Jonathan Waite and John 
Waite a parcel of land f ' for divers good causes and con- 
siderations but more especially to encourage the building 
of a meeting-house for the public worship of God " which 
includes what is now the public square whereon stands the 
Soldiers' Monument in Saugus Centre and the old burying 
ground lvino- to the west. 



lO LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

William Taylor was a prominent citizen of the place, 
the son of James Taylor, who for many years was the 
Treasurer of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. 

Through the marriage of William Taylor's daughter, 
Anna, to Benjamin Parker, his blood and his influence 
have ever since been potent in the affairs of the Parish, 
and Town of Saugus. 

The building which still stands, though degraded in 
use and removed across the road to the north, stood upon 
what was then a little knoll. It was forty-five feet six inches 
in length by thirty-five feet eight inches in width with posts 
twenty feet in height. It had three doors, two of which 
opened directly into the room of worship, while on the 
south side was the main door with a large porch into which 
were three entrances. When finally abandoned as a church 
edifice there was a single entrance at the west end. It 
had galleries and sounding board but never had a steeple 
or cupola and was as plain and austere and homely as all 
the Puritan meeting-houses were. The building was com- 
pleted in 1737. 

The proprietors organized under a general law of the 
Province authorizing the owners of lands held in common 
to form themselves into an association. 

By so associating "they could govern themselves sub- 
stantially in the same manner as a parish. 

The General Court gave them a share of the income 
of the First Parish ' ; to maintain preaching amon£ them- 
selves during the more difficult seasons of the year." 

In 1738, Edward Cheever, a graduate of Harvard of 
1737, then twenty-one years of age, a resident of the West 
End became the first minister of the congregation and the 
only minister of the proprietors as distinct from the later 
organized parish. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. II 

After a struggle of twelve years on January 27, 

1740-50, a joint committee of the General Court reported 
in favor of the new parish. 

At the first meeting of the parish February 2, 1750, it 
was voted "' That the parish did concur with the church 
and made choice of Mr. Joseph Roby to be settled in the 
work of the ministry in. said parish." 

Thereafter, for the period of fifty-two years, Parson 
Roby faithfully and efficiently served the parish and 
church as minister and friend, fie died January 31, 1803, 
and his name and quaint-marked tombstone may be seen 
in the old burying-ground across the way. 

Like so many of the old Puritan churches, this one was 
a storm centre of the ecclesiastical duels of the first half of 
the nineteenth century. The Universalists won in the end 
and occupied it until 1S60 when it was sold and removed 
to its present site. 

Whoever seeks to know more of the house may be 
referred to the exhaustive and svmpathetic Historical Ad- 
dress upon the Third Church in Lynn, delivered by Ben- 
jamin N. Johnson at its 150th Anniversary, October 13, 
1S87. 

See also sketches of Saugus by Benjamin F. Newhall, 
printed in Lynn Reporter in 1862 and 1863, which it is 
hoped will sometime be printed in a more convenient form. 

We are indebted to Mr. Charles A. Lawrence for the 
pen-and-ink sketch from which the illustration of the old 
building was made. 



12 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
HOWARD MUDGE N.EWHALL, Recording Secretary 

At the Fifth Annual Meeting of the Society, at the Room of the Society, 
Wednesday Evening;, January S, 1902. 



The membership of the Society at the end of the fifth 
year has increased to four hundred and forty-four, eighty 
new members having been elected during the year, and 
ten applications now being on file for election at the Janu- 
ary meeting of the newly elected Council, thus making the 
Lynn Historical Society one of the large societies of the 
State in point of membership. This large membership 
gives an assurance of increasing usefulness and a proper 
amount of money to do the work which the Society ought 
to do. The present year, with the purchase of cases, the 
entertainment of visiting societies, and the removal of the 
rooms, has brought unusual expenses, but great enjoyment 
with them also. Three members have died during the 
year: General Charles C. Fry, Hon. Joseph G. Brown, 
and Mrs. Annie W. Svmonds, two of whom were among 
the number who signed the original call for the first meet- 
ing of the Society on December 18, 1896. 

The first meeting of the year after the annual meeting 
was held on Thursday evening, February 21, at which 
time an interesting paper was read by Mr. William Stone, 
on the subject of " Lynn, and its old time Shoemaker's 
Shops." 

On Thursday evening, March 21, a paper which had 
been prepared by Mr. Charles Buffum was read by Mr. 
William Stone, entitled, " The Style of Living, Habits, 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 3 

Manners and Customs of the People, of Lynn early in the 
Last Century." 

On Thursday evening, April 25, a paper was read by 
Mr. Charles E. Mann on the subject of "The Old Hart 
House," which stood at the corner of Boston and North 
Federal streets. A paper was also read by Mrs. Susan T. 
Hill, entitled "Old Time Schools and School-houses." At 
this meeting Mr. George H. Martin spoke of a curious fact 
he had found in connection with the old Parish records 
that the schools of the town were evidently owned and con- 
ducted by the parish. 

On Thursday evening, May 16, a meeting was ar- 
ranged by the Committee on Genealogy, with a paper on 
the subject of Genealogy by Capt. John L. Parker, Chair- 
man of the Committee. The paper, as intended, brought 
out an interesting discussion, participated in by several 
ladies and gentlemen of the Society, and by Mr. Mcintosh 
of the Peabody Historical Society who was present. The 
meeting was ideal in the number of those taking part, and 
was one of the Society's most interesting and profitable 
'meetings. 

On Monday, June 17th, the Historical Societies of 
Essex County spent the day in Lynn Woods, by invitation 
of the Lynn Society. The day was most propitious and 
an ideal day for such an occasion. The headquarters in 
the Woods were made near the summit of Mount Gilead, 
and tramping parties visited Dungeon Rock, Wolf Pits, 
Rocking Boulder, Weetamoo Cliff and Frog Boulder. 
Remarks were made by Benjamin X. Johnson, Esq., Presi- 
dent of the Society, Philip A. Chase, Esq., Hon. Nathan 
M. Hawkes, all of whom spoke of Lynn and Lynn Woods, 
and were followed by Hon. Robert S. Rantoul of Salem, 
Rev. Mr. Hovey of Newburvport, E. Moody Boynton, Esq. 



14 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

of Newburyportj Judge Ira A. Abbott of Haverhill, and 
John "YV. Hutchinson of Lynn. 

On Wednesday, August 14, by invitation of the Pea- 
body Historical Society, the Society visited the former home 
of John Proctor, hanged for witchcraft at Salem, August 
19, 1692. In the afternoon there were several interesting 
speeches in the grove where the farewell picnic dinner to 
George Peabodv was given August 1 ;, iSy7. 

On Thursday evening, October 17, a paper was read 
by Ezra D. I lines, Esq., Assistant Register of Probate of 
Essex County, and member of the Dan vers Historical 
Society on the subject of " The March of Arnold and his 
men from Cambridge to Quebec." 

On Saturday afternoon, October 19, by invitation of 
Hon. and Mrs. Asa T. Nevvhall, a large number of the 
Societv visited their home on Lvnniield street, where seven 
generations of the Newhali family have lived. The mem- 
bers were generously and bountifully entertained, and the 
host and hostess with their family made it a very pleasant 
occasion. 

December 1, 1901, the Society removed from the 
building of the Lynn Institution for Savings and First 
National Bank, No. 25 Exchange street, to the building of 
the Lynn Gas and Electric Company, No. 90 Exchange 
street. The new rooms comprise a well-arranged hall for 
meetings, a small hall for exhibition of the property of the 
Society, two coat rooms, and a committee room. The 7 
Society has a lease of the rooms for five years, with the 
privilege of renewal for five years. The first meeting in 
the new rooms was on Thursday evening, January 2, 1902, 
the occasion being a social evening, at which about two 
hundred members of the Society were present. 

The Monday afternoon teas were held by the ladies of 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 1 5 

the Reception Committee during January, February and 
March, 1901, and the first meeting" for 1902 was held on 
January 6. These occasions are well attended by mem- 
bers of the Society and their friends, giving an opportunity 
to visit the rooms, and examine the objects of interest 
which have been presented to the Society, and creating an 
interest among many to become members. 

The following gifts have been received by the Society 
during the year : 

From Edward B. Newhall, one pair old style shoes ; and wooden 
sole pattern. 

From Frank M. James, photograph of monument in George- 
town ; bag of old coins. 

From Philip A. Chase, old three dollar Nahant bank note. 

From the City of Lynn, volume containing account of fiftieth 
anniversary municipal celebration. 

From Nathaniel Melcher, linen handkerchief which was the 
property of Nathaniel Ingalls. 

From J. Warren Carswell, ruffling iron. 

From Lydia E. Galloupe, subscription for Omnibus line from 
Breed's wharf to Lynn Hotel ; poem, petition of Town of 
Lynn for fence around the Common ; fifty-five old rewards 
of merit; tuition bill of 1S33 ; and other papers. 

From the City of Lynn, the first mayor's chair, used by George 
Hood, first mayor. 

From George C. Herbert, framed photograph of Breed and 
Bassett's wharf on Commercial street in 1867. 

From St. Stephen's church, loan of small organ pipes from the 
organ in St. Margaret's church, King's Lynn, England. 

From Harriet E. Holder, fine assortment of plates and crockery 
used in family of late Nathaniel Holder; Canton sugar 
bowl ; tea-pot; wine glasses; pitcher; glass tumbler. 

From Salem Public Library, Trustees' Report. 

From Medford Historical Society, publications. 



10 LV.NN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Essex Institute, publications. 

From West Newbury Historical Society, publications. 

From Maiden Public Library, annual report. 

From Marblehead Public Library, annual report. 

From Ipswich Historical Society, publications. 

From Lowell Old Residents Association, publications. 

From New England Historic and Genealogical Society, publica- 
tions. 

From Dummcr Academy, annual report. 

From Nantucket Historical Society, publication and pamphlet, 
giving record of Nantucket land and owners. 

From Bostonian Society, catalogue of Colburn collection. 

From Bridgewater Historical Society, publication. 

From Isaac K. Harris, oriole's nest. 

From Mrs. George C. Houghton, catalogue of loan exhibition 
by Daughters of the Revolution. 

From Mrs. Arie G. Melcher, seraphim. 

From Alfred Cross, programme of laying the corner stone of the 
First M. E. Church ; list of members First M. E. Church, 
1900; an ancient plate. 

From Charles A. Harwood, a Washington army button ; Harri- 
son button; old English coin, 1734; three sharks' teeth; 
two hand made nails from old Bowler house, Glenmere; 
five petrified clams found in cliffs at Gay Head ; four old 
keys; five Jackson cents. 

From Emma A. Tucker, ancient plate. 

From Ivers L. Witherell, almanacs ; a scrap-book of illustrated 
envelopes collected during the Civil War; photograph of 
Union street buildings before the erection of the Spinney 
and Blake buildings. 

From Eunice L. Witherell, one pair steelyards, 1813 ; one tea- 
pot ; one fan painted by Governor Thomas Wilson while in 
prison for high treason in 1S44. 

From Ellen Mudge Burrill, one State of Massachusetts Bay 
Treasury note, 1779. 

From Susan T. Hill, wool cards. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 17 

Prom an unknown person, an old Empire 5 fire engine com- 
pany hat. 

From Mary A. Noyes, two singing books; 1S31 collection of 
hymns; box of old shoes, shoe tools and shoemaker's apron. 

From Peter M. Neal, an ancient certificate. 

From George H. Waitt, one Royal Standard Dictionary, 1796; 
one Bible, 1S14; one certificate signed by Ezra Newhall, 
1792. 

From. Hannah V. Putnam, sketch of the life of Rev. Joseph 
Mottey of Lynnfield, 1S22. 

From Annie P. Newhall, old painting. 

From Eliza A. Aldworth, counterfeit bill on old Mechanics' Bank. 

From Pamelia B. Muuge, Confederate bill. 

From Harrison Newhall, Lynn Lyceum lecture tickets. 

From Gertrude Emery, old saddle used in coming to Lynn in old 
times. 

From William T. Oliver, original drawing of Market street as it 
appealed in 1S20, drawn in 1S72 and 1S73. 

From Wendell P. Flanders, from the estate of George W. Flan- 
ders, twenty-three old books; almanacs; copies of New- 
buryport Morning Star, 1794; New Hampshire Gazette, 
1807; Boston Investigator, 1S35; Boston Daily Chrono- 
type, 1S50; Skowhegan Sentinel, 1838; Perpetual Calen- 
dar ; and other publications. 
. From Mrs.. Charles E. Meader, painting of Daniel Webster's 
house at Marshfield. 

From Joseph G. Brown, umbrella carried by Goold Brown the 
I, grammarian. 

From Caroline S. Lee, poem recited at the re-opening of the 
Lynn Home for Aged Women by J. Warren Newhall, Jan- 
uary 16, 1 888. 

From Henry B. Preble, piece of the Charter Oak at Hartford, 
presented to Nelson Lewis, foreman of Silver Grey Engine 
Company by the mayor of Hartford when the company 
visited Hartford. 



iS LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From Martha G. Robinson, weaving board said to be over two 
hundred years old. 

From William S. Burrill, an old style boot-jack. 

From Massachusetts Secretary of State, Volume VIII of the 
Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution. 

From Samuel A. Halliday, blocks used in printing at the old 
Lynn print works. 

From Mrs. Isaac II. Stearns, hour-glass brought over from Eng- 
land in 1630 in ship Arabella by the first Isaac Stearns and 
descended to Dr. Isaac II., being the seventh Isaac in direct 
line; trencher brought over by the same ; candle-stick, the 
property of Mrs. Sarah Fiilebrown of Mansfield, grand- 
mother of Dr. Isaac II. Stearns; trunk of Dr. Isaac H. 
Stearns., who was surgeon of the Twenty-second Massachu- 
setts Regiment, carried by him through the Civil War; 
overcoat buttons and vest buttons worn by the fourth Isaac 
Stearns in the Revolutionary War ; book, Children in the 
Wood; Youth's Companion of 1S34; gravy tureen, prop- 
erty of Betsey Baker, who died in 1S00 and which was 
then very aged ; two knots for looping back pulpit curtains 
in Westminister, taken down in 1S36; tongs; and a book. 

From Birney H. Robidou, clock made by Jesse Frost in Lynn 
in 1834. 

From a friend of Charles F. Peirce, dedication programme of 
the latest High School-house. 

From Henry O. Fox, copy of Ulster County Gazette, contain- 
ing account of funeral of George Washington. 

From William H. Sisson, shoe tools made by him, and used by 
him for fifty years. 

From Elizabeth C. Osborn for herself and the Peabody Histori- 
cal Society, two copies of the Lynn Tattler ; copy of 
Forum; report of Lynn School Committee, 1847-1S4S; 
report of Accounts, 1S52, 

From Francis II . Lee of Salem, medal. 

From Howard Mudge Newhall, programmes of the entertain- 
ment of Porto Rican guests, and pamphlets. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 19 

From the Misses M. Annie Phillips and Lucilla A. Phillips, a 
painting of Eben Breed, who was instrumental in having 
legislation passed favorable to the shoe manufacture in early 
days. 

From Otis Upham, framed photograph of the building corner of 
Exchange and Spring streets before the Lynn conflagration 
of 18S9, formerly occupied by Lucian Newhall, Charles B. 
Tebbetts, and Hood, Johnson & Co. 

From Wilder. T. Bowers, lantern slides of Nathan Breed, James 
N. Buffum, Isaiah Breed, Parsons Cooke, Micajah Pratt, 
David Rodman, Interior old Public Library, 1S76, Lynn 
Harbor, 1S56, from High Rock, another view of Lynn Har- 
bor from High Rock, 1S56, and Lynn from High Rock, 
1S56; the views of Lynn Harbor from High Rock may at 
some day be very valuable, as they were taken at low tide, 
and show the location of the flats before any harbor im- 
provements were made. 

From William H. GerrJsh, a State of Massachusetts lottery 
ticket of 1790. 

From Asa T. Newhall, a scrap-book containing the letters and 
telegrams received from all parts of the United States and 
the world, in connection with the Lynn conflagration of 
November 26, 1SS9. 

From Frank Keene, an original Alonzo Lewis History of Lynn, 
printed in four parts in pamphlet form! 

From Mrs. M. H. Vennard, volumes as follows : Hymns and 
poems o r Rev. Isaac Watts; Constitution of Massachusetts, 
1S07; Memory of Washington, 1S00; Grecian History by 
Dr. Goldsmith, 1824; History of New England, 1S20; 
Jedediah Morse and Elijah Parish ; French War, General 
Stark, 1 83 1. 

From Charles L. Alley, Poem of Cyrus M. Tracy at the dedica- 
ation of the City Hall in 1S67 ; catalogue of the Lynn High 
School, 1S67 ; Constitution of the Lynn Assembly, iSSr ; a 
piece of the old elm on Boston Common. 






I 















20 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

From the will of Frances Ellen Mullen, by Daniel B. Moulton, 
the executor, one pair of gilt decanters ; one gilt glass water 
jar; all over one hundred years old; and three cups and 
saucers over one hundred and fifty years old. This is the 
first bequest ever made under any will to the Lynn Histor- 
ical Society. The fine specimens of glass candle covers 
which belonged to Mrs. Washington Haven were given by 
her direction, by her daughter, after her decease, and these 
two are the only two instances thus far in which the Society 
has been so remembered. Considering the comparatively 
recent formation of the Society it is remarkable that we have 
been thus early remembered. 

-From Charles II . Hastings, photograph of the old Goodridge 
house on Western avenue. 

From Flora H. Breed, an old history of the United States. 

From George Z. Collins, steelyards once used by Zaccheus 
Collins. 

From Sallie H. Hacker, an old plan of the houses and buildings 
about Lynn Park and Common, a picture of George Fox, 
and the loan of valuable deeds, papers, profiles and books. 

From Amos P. Tapley, a shoemaker's shop, whenever the Society 
provides a permanent location for it. 

From Joseph Wesley Breed, old iron mortar and pestle, said to 
have been cast at the old Iron Works over two hundred 
years ago. 

From Mary E. Percival, a tile picture of the old Oliver house. 

From William S. Burrill, a diagram map of railroads diverging 
from Boston, showing the depots and distances. 

From Charles A. Lawrence, a Lynn tax bill of 1S15, John 
Mansfield, Jr., collector, and an old shoe store order. 

The Society has also been given the use for the pres- 
ent winter of a beautiful upright piano by Miss Alice J. 
Boynton, formerly of Lynn, but now of Washington, D. C. 

Last year the Secretery referred in his report to the 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 21 

faithful work of the Custodians, and takes occasion this 
year to repeat his words of appreciation for the Society 
with emphasis. The Society owes a great deal of appre- 
ciation and thanks to them. They have had not only the 
regular care and custody of the rooms and collection, but 
have had entire charge, and done all the work excepting 
transportation, and a good deal of that also, from the 
former room to the new rooms. They have placed num- 
bers and names of donors on all the articles belonging to 
the Society, and have arranged a complete card catalogue 
for reference. What they have done has been clearly 
work, and lots of it. The Secretary and members of the 
Council have had more opportunity than most of the mem- 
bers of the Society to know of it, and what they have done 
should be fully known, felt and appreciated. 

The Council, by the By-Laws, is the active body of 
the Society. What has been done by them, and what has 
come before them, can be fully understood by an examina- 
tion of the records of the Recording Secretary. The 
Council meets on the last Monday evening of each month 
and at such other times as special business may require. 
They are a very interested Committee as officers, and the 
Society is to be congratulated on the devotion and faithful- 
ness with which they consider its affairs. 

Nine of your Committees are active, hold meetings, 
and fully attend to the work in the departments of the 
Society for which they are appointed. There are some of 
the Committees which do not hold meetings or do any 
work. It would seem to the Secretary, that if the chair- 
manship of the non-active Committees should be given by 
the Council to one of its members, or if regular reports of 
meetings should be required by the Council, it might lead 
to work in departments which are now neglected. This, 



22 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

however, is a matter for the Council to consider, but the 
Secretary feels it can well be suggested. 

The preservation of an old-time shoemaker's shop is 
an assured fact. What is known as the old Lye shop will 
be donated by Mr. Amos P. Tapley, whenever the Society 
provides a permanent location. The shop has been placed 
by him on his own land on Mall street temporarily, to re- 
main until such time as the Society provides or obtains the 
suitable and permanent location required. 

The Society can well be pardoned if it should indulge 
in a little self-congratulation. With only five years to its 
credit, it stands with a solid membership of interested 
ladies and gentlemen, with an historical collection well be- 
gun, most attractive rooms, and the knowledge that a great 
deal of historical work has been accomplished. The Soci- 
ety has honored its existence and has been welcomed and 
well supported. Its largest work is before it and in the 
future, for which its strong organization, large supporting 
membership and preliminary work has been preparing it. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

EUGENE A. PUTNAM, Treasurer, 
in account with the LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dr. 
Received from membership dues from Jan. 10, 1901. 

to Jan. 8. 1902 $821 00 

Starr Club, use of rooms 3900 

Whist party, use of rooms . . 2 00 

Board of Trade, use of rooms 5 00 

Special cars, Oct. 19 12 85 

Portraits for 1900 Register 105 00 

Balance, Jan. 10. 1901 295 06 

. $1,279 9* 

Cr. 

Rent of rooms to Dec. I, 1901 $23958 

Janitor, service 24 00 

S. S. Lurvey, music 15 00 

A. Schlehubei , catering 65 59 

William Miller cV Son. florists 5 00 

Howard Mudge Newhall. postage and postals 4S 35 

Envelopes and postage stamps 13 60 

G. H. & A. L. Nichols, printing 63 25 

Thomas P. Nichols, annual registers, 1000 27S 00 

William S. Burrill. insurance 3 75 

Lynn Gas and Electric Co 1 1 88 

William S. Burrill. supplies • 4 7° 

S. S. Pierce & Co., tea 1 00 

Joseph Young, groceries 1 45 

Sundry expenses . 1 25 

John S. Wright, finishing table 20;) 

Police, June 17 200 

Estate of E. H.Johnson, use of chairs. June 17 ... . 1300 

George C. Herbert, envelopes 1 00 

George A. Higgins, carriage hire, June 17 4 20 

Amount carried fonvard, $79$ 60 



24 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Amount ht'oughi. forward*,- $79860 

Clerical service for year 1901 3 00 

Ezra D. } lines, lecture 500 

Boston and Northern R. R., ears. Oct. 19 1600 

\V. E. Parker, library bureau 2600 

Adams, Gushing & Foster 3 03 

Hatch cV Fernald. cases and labor 60 70 

Anthony Earle. stock and labor in new rooms 4S 77 

J. L. Fairbanks, register . 6 50 

C. T. Curtis & Son. moving furniture S 00 



Lynn. Institution for Savings $10000 

Balance Central National Dank 185 39 

Cash on hand 18 92 



$975 60 

30431 
$1,27991 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 

The undersigned having been appointed to audit the ac- 
counts of Eugene A. Putnam, Treasurer, hereby report that they 
have examined the accounts and vouchers as presented to them, 
and they appear to be correct. 

Nathan M. Hawkes, 
J. Warren Carswell, 

Lynn, January S. igo2. Auditors. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Lynn Historical Society the sum of 
Dollars. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GENEALOGY. 



zj> 



The Committee on Genealogy has made an earnest 
endeavor to add to the number of family records now in 
the possession of the Soeiety. Our list of genealogies has 
increased to 113, but as these are the contributions of but 
53 members, it will be seen that a large amount of work 
must be done before we can record a full set, in which 
each family connected with the Historical Society will find 
a place. One meeting of the Society during the year was 
devoted to Genealogy, a paper being read and an inter- 
esting discussion had upon the subject. The members of 
the Committee have put forth earnest efforts to interest the 
Society, and have always been ready to assist those not 
familiar with the work of tracing family lines, and ready 
to render further help. 

A year ago it was announced as the purpose of the 
committee to bind the manuscript genealogies into a book, 
but that has been found impracticable, and the records will 
be preserved in the form in which they have been prepared. 
The genealogies are numbered in the order in which they 
are received, and additional records from the same mem- 
ber retain the original number with an added letter, as, for 
example, No. 53, a, b, c, and so on. One member has 
contributed eight genealogies, tracing her descent from as 
many emigrant ancestors. This illustrates the possibilities 
of this branch of work of the Society, and should encour- 
age all to at least attempt the preparation of one. 

The Committee meets on the first Monday evening of 
each month, when any information that is desired will be 



26 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

willingly given, and we cordially invite the members to 
avail themselves of the opportunity for assistance in trac- 
ing their family lines. Grateful acknowledgment is made 
to all who have responded to the requests of the Committee 
to add to its treasures. 

For the Committee, 

John L. Parker, 

Lynx, Jcinncuy S, 1902 Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PHOTOGRAPHY. 



George S. Bliss, Chairman of the Committee on 
Photography, made a verbal report that the Committee had 
made a large number of pictures during the past year and 
planned for a systematic illustration of the city, which 
would comprise all the public buildings, and the prominent 
business structures. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO SECURE PUBLICATON 
OF OLD TOWN RECORDS. 



Hon. Nathan M. Havykes reported verbally what pro- 
gress had been made, and that a commencement of the 
work had been made by the City Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 
AND PRINTING. 



Howard Mudge Newhall, Chairman, reported ver- 
bally what had been accomplished, and that the publica- 
tions and notices which had been received by the members 
of the Society was the report of the work of the Committee. 



\ 





V 
f 


1 


i 


% 


■ ,. 



CHARLES COFFIX FRY 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 2f 



NECROLOGIES. 

CHARLES COFFIN FRY 

Son of Homer and Patience (Boyce) Fry, born on Tremont 
street, Lynn, May 31, 1842, died at his home on Laighton 
street in this city, March 21, 1901. 

Mr. Fry inherited the traits of a sturdy New England 
ancestry. William Fry and his wife Hannah were mem- 
bers of the Doyer, X. II., Society of Friends at the time of 
the birth of their son William, 7th day, 12th mo. 1694, who 
married in 1724, Abigail, daughter of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Otis) Yarney. They removed to Kittery, Maine, where 
on the nth day, 12th mo. 1731-2, their son John was 
born. He married June 21, 1762, "Merriam," daughter of 
Obadiah and Eleanor Wheeler of Bolton, Mass,, and on 
September 21, 1773, their son John was born. John mar- 
ried June 6, 1798, Lydia, daughter of Robert and Sarah 
(Hunt) Earle of Leicester, Mass. Their son Homer born 
October 22, 1801, married October 12, 1S32, Patience, 
. daughter of Jonathan Boyce 6 of Hanvers (Jonathan, 
Jonathan, 4 Jonathan, 3 Joseph, 2 Joseph 1 ) and Anna Breed. 

Mr. Fry was descended from two of the early Lynn 
settlers ; on his father's side from Thomas Xewhall through 
Mary Xewhall, who married Robert Earle, and on his 
mother's side from Allen Breed through Anna Breed 
(Samuel, 5 Ebenezer, 4 Samuel, 3 Allen, 2 Allen 1 ). 

Eyen as a boy Mr. Fry was noted for thoroughness 
and self-reliant energy, and to those traits his life suc- 
cess was largely due. He received his early education in 
the public schools of Lynn, entering the High School in 



28 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

the class of 1855, when but thirteen years of age. After 
he was graduated he en-gaged in the shoe business in his 
father's factory on Market street, and in September. 1862, 
when but a few months over twenty years of age, he en- 
listed among the nine months men of the Eighth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M., serving as Corporal under General 
John C. Foster, in the Department of North Carolina, and 
later with the Army of the Potomac in Maryland, until 
after the expiration of his time of service in 1863. After 
the war he served as First Lieutenant of Company I, Eighth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M.yfrom 1S65 to 1874; as Ad- 
jutant of said regiment from 1874 to J ^75 •> as Major of the 
Seventh Battalion Infantry, M. Y. M., 1876, 1877 and 1878 ; 
as Adjutant of the Eighth Regiment in 1S79, I S8o and 
18S1, and as Assistant Adjutant-General of the Second 
Brigade, M. V. M., from 188.2 to 1897. Upon his own 
application he was retired July 29, 1897, with the rank of 
Brigadier-General, after nearly thirty- five years of military 
service, including his war service in 1862 and 1863. 

From 1873 to 1875, * ie m company with his brother 
James Bovce Fry, manufactured shoes on Exchange street. 
In 1876 he was elected City Auditor, and in 1877, City 
Marshal, a position he held two years. In 1S79, ne s P ent 
the summer in Europe, and in 1880, was elected clerk 
and treasurer of the Lynn Gas Light Company, and later 
that of the Lynn Gas and Electric Company, which he 
held until his decease. 

In addition to his business duties Mr. Fry was called 
to fill many positions of honor and trust, and this he did 
with unswerving fidelity and indefatigable energy, as he 
believed and acted upon his belief, that the best citizenship 
involved an active participation in public affairs. lie ex- 
erted a strong influence in political matters as a member of 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 29 

the City Government from 1S96 to 1901. As President of 
the Common Council, 1897-1898, he was a Trustee of the 
Public Library, and member of the School Committee. A 

member of the Board of Aldermen, 1899, 1 9° ' I 9 OI > being 
President of the Board in 1901. 

He was a prominent Mason and had held the following 
positions : Master of Mount Carrnel Lodge, 1876-1877 ; 
Eminent Commander of Olivet Commandery, 1882-1883 ; 
Right Eminent Grand Commander of the Grand Command- 
ery of Knights Templars of Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, 1893-1894. lie was President of the Massachusetts 
Unionof Knights Templars Commandersin 1896-1897. He 
was long a member of Mount Carmel Lodge, Sutton Chap- 
ter, Zebulon Council. Olivet Commandery ; Boston Lafay- 
ette Lodge of Perfection: Giles F. Yates Council, Princes 
of Jerusalem; Mt. Olivet Chapter, Rose Croix, Massachu- 
setts Consistory ; Aleppo Temple, Mystic Shrine ; a prom- 
inent member of the Grand Commandery of Knights 
Templars of Massachusetts and Rhode Island and the 
Grand Encampment of the United States, and an honorary 
member of the Mt. Supreme Council, Northern Masonic 
Jurisdiction, 33d degree. He was a member of General 
Lander Post 5, G. A. R., of the Park and Oxford Clubs, 
President of the Park Club. 1892, 1S93, 1S94 ; and a mem- 
ber of the Lvnn Historieal Society. 

Mr. Fry was of a positive and forceful temperament, and 
possessed genuine qualities of organization and leadership. 
Independent in thought and action himself, he fully con- 
ceded the same independence to others. Those who knew 
him best were impressed with the justice, moderation, and 
charity of his personal judgments. He was a sincere 
friend, and always had a willing ear and a sympathetic 
heart for those in need or sorrow. ''He was a leader 



30 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

among men, not by reason of self-assertion, but by the 
force of bis character, the genuineness of his manhood, 
the dignity of his life, and the unselfishness of his pur- 
poses." 



JOSEPH GOOLD BROWN 

Was born in Pembroke, Plymouth County, Mass.. June 
19, 1 S3 5. and died in Lynn, Mass., May 27, 1901. lie 
was the eldest son of Samuel Brown, a direct descendant 
of Chad Browne, who came to this country from England 
in 1638, and settled in Providence, R. I. Chad Browne 
was a Baptist minister and one of the chief men in the 
colony founded by Roger Williams, his name being the 
first of thirty-nine signatures to the Charter for the Rhode 
Island plantation, obtained from the King of England. 

Joseph G. Brown's mother was Maria Hussey of Nan- 
tucket, who was a descendant, in the seventh generation, of 
Tristram Collin, one of the first proprietors of that island, 
and its governor in 167 1. Mr. Brown's parents were 
Quakers, of which society he remained a life-long member, 
being a constant attendant at its services, and holding the 
office of Treasurer of the Lynn Meeting until within a few 
months of his death, when his failing health obliged him 
to resign it. 

•As was usual with the men of his generation, he 
received the greater part of his education at the district 
school in his own town, but it was supplemented by a 
course at the Friends' School, in Providence, R. I. 

.After leaving school, like most young men, he felt 
that his energies demanded wider scope than was offered 
him on his father's farm, and he went to Wilmington, 
Dekuvare, where he entered into the hardware business. 



PL 












JOSEPH GOQLD BROWN. 






LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 31 

He gave it up, however, in 1862, and came to Lvnn to 
engage in the manufacturing of shoes with his brother, 
William Austin Brown, under the firm name of Brown 
Brothers, Afterwards, and until the great lire of 1SS9, he 
conducted a large shoe business himself on the site of the 
present Brown building, which he erected after the de- 
struction by that tire of a former one built by his brother 
and himself. 

In politics, Mr. Brown was a staunch Republican and 
was elected bv that party, in the years 1S96 and 1S97, to 
represent Wards Two and Four and Nahant in the State 
Legislature. During his first term, he was a member of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Printing ; and the follow- 
ing year he was House Chairman of that Committee and 
also a member of the Committee on Liquor Laws. 

Tn 1S98, he served the city as an Alderman from 
Ward Four and was twice re-elected. 

In both of these public offices, Mr. Brown displayed his 
uncompromising fidelity to what he believed to be for the 
good of the people, and his successive elections to the 
Legislature and City Council indicate the esteem in which 
he was held by his fellow citizens. 

For many years, and up to the time of his death, he was 
one of the Trustees of the Nathan Breed estate of Lynn, 
the duties of which office he, performed with faithfulness 
and exactness to the last. 

Mr. Brown was a member of the Lynn Historical 
Societv, and was always deeply interested in everything 
connected with the welfare of the city of his adoption. 

In 1854, he married Katherine Murray Bostwick of 
New York, who survives him. 

Five children, all of whom are living, were the fruit 
of their union, namelv : Maria B. Woodbury, Laura L. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Sprague, Cora E. Hilton, Mary Emma Hallett, and 
Bethanv S. Brown. 



ANNA MARIA (WARREN) SYMONDS 

Was born in Lynn, August 17, 1S43, the second child of 
Asa and Cynthia P. (Breed) Warren. On the paternal 
side, she was in the seventh generation from James Warren 
who settled at Kitterv, Maine, in 1636, and on the mater- 
nal side, the ninth generation from Allen Breed and thus 
was connected in greater or less degree with nearly all 
the old Lynn families. 

Her childhood was passed in this city in the little 
house on Nahant street, once standing on ground now 
owned and occupied as a home by Benjamin N. Johnson. 
When ten years old, her father's health necessitated a re- 
moval from Lynn, and he undertook the management of 
a branch of the shoe business of S. M. Bubier (with whom 
he had occupied a position in Lynn), at Naples, Maine. 
Here, on the shore of Long Lake, the family lived for six 
years, and here occurred the fire in which the father and 
one brother lost their lives. The home thus sadly broken 
up. the remaining members of the family returned to Lynn 
to spend the remaining years, and took up their residence 
in the house next their former home on Nahant street. In 
1870 the subject of this sketch was married to Walter E. 
Symonds (son of Stiliman Lothrop and Olive Gould 
(Lovell) Symonds), at that time a member of the firm of 
B. F. Doak & Co., and now successor of D. H. Sweetser 
as Treasurer of the Lynn Institution for Savings. Two 
years later they moved to the house on Nahant street, where 
they have since resided and there Mrs. Symonds died, July 
19, 1901, after an illness starting with a slight cold in 



AJVJTA MARIA ( WARREN ) SY3WA r DS. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



^v) 



April, and gradually showing itself of a serious and then 
of a fatal character. 

Mrs. Symonds was a woman of sweet and loving 
nature, active in all good works: has endeared herself to a 
wide circle of friends who mourn her loss, as the societies 
of which she was a member miss her ever ready and effi- 
cient help. She was a member of the Historical Society, 
one of the first and most constant members of the North 
Shore Club ; was thoroughly identified with the work of 
the First tlniversalist Church, in all its branches, and was 
always especially interested and an active participant in 
many charitable and philanthropic works. The family, to 
whom comes so great a loss, consists of her husband, two 
children, Anna Louise (Mrs. Charles A. Collins), and 
Warren Lovell, and a sister, Mary A. Warren. 

••I cannot say, and I will not say 
That she is dead. She is just away. 

With a cheery smile, and a wave of the hand. 
She has wandered into an unknown land. 

And left us dreaming how very fair 

It needs must be, since she lingers there." 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



THE ESTABLISHED CHURCH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

A paper read before the Lynn Historical Society by 
JIknkv T. Jam mls, Es<^. 



Ill the history o£ the struggle between the Puritans and the 
various opposing sects which grew up among them — a struggle 
which continued well into the nineteenth century, until it ended 
in the final divorce of church and State and the establishment of 
that measure of religious freedom which we enjoy to-day — no 
descendant of the early Massachusetts settlers can fail to be 
interested. Congregationalists, whose faith was formerly the 
established religion of Massachusetts — Baptists and Quakers, 
Unitarians and Universalists, whose predecessors rebelled with 
ultimate success against the supremacy of that established 
religion — all unite, at the present time, in the endeavor to learn 
the truth concerning the two centuries of religious warfare 
through which this Commonwealth has passed. 

That the principal reason for the Puritan emigration to 
Massachusetts was the desire to escape the persecutions of the 
Anglican prelates, is familiar to every one. The religious zeal, 
courage, and fortitude of the Puritans have commanded the 
admiration of the world ; but those very qualities, when given 
full sway in the wilds of New England, led to the establishment 
of a despotism as unbearable as that from which they had 
escaped. 

It is a sad reflection upon human nature, that in the history 
of the world, until- the present age, no religious sect has been 
able to refrain from persecution when it has had the power; and 
a little thought may perhaps lead to the conclusion that the 
spirit of religious oppression is not quite dead yet. The Jews 
and the Romans persecuted the early Christians; the Christians, 
then formed into the Roman Catholic Church, inflicted the 
terrors of the Inquisition upon the Protestants ; the Church of 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



.>:> 



England, becoming the dominant sect of English Protestants, in 
turn harassed the Puritans: the Puritans, coming to New Eng- 
land, took their revenge upon the Baptists and Quakers; while 
the Baptists and Quakers, for all we know, failed to become 
active persecutors merely from want of opportunity. 

The Puritans valued their religion so highly, that they 
determined to prevent any other sect from gaining a foothold in 
Massachusetts. In the Colon}' Laws we find this provision, first 
enacted in 163 1 — " To the end the body of the freemen may be 
- preserved of honest and good men, It is Ordered, That hence- 
forth no man shall be admitted to the freedome of this Common- 
wealth, but such as are members of some of the Churches, 
within the limits of this. Jurisdiction." This was not amended 
until 1 66.1, and even then no unorthodox person could be admit- 
ted to citizenship. 

Very early in the history of the Colony a strangely tolerant 
declaration was made. That remarkable code of laws called 
the Body of Liberties of .1641 contained this passage; "Wee 
allowe private meetings for edification in religion amongst 
Christians of all sortes of people. So it be without just effence 
for number, time, place or other circum stances." But our Puri- 
tan ancestors reserved the privilege of giving abroad and liberal 
interpretation to the words "just offence"; and a congregation 
of unorthodox persons, who presumed to rely upon the words of 
the Body of Liberties, would probably have been told that 
I accursed heretics were never intended to be benefited by the 

language of that act. In fact, the way in which the Puritans 
justified their persecutions was by representing all unorthodox 
persons as heretics and disciples of the devil, and therefore not 
entitled to toleration. One of the early statutes, passed in 
16-14-46, declared that " Although no humane Power, be Lord 
over the Faith & Consciences of men, yet because such as bring 
in damnable Heresies, tending to the subversion of the Christian 
Faith & distinctions of the soules of men, ought duely to be 
restrained, from such notorious impieties. It is therefore 
Ordered," that those who broach and maintain "any Damnable 



36 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Heresies," such as denying the immortality of the soul, the resur- 
rection of the body, original sin, the atonement, the fourth com- 
mandment, or the baptism of infants, shall be banished. To 
deny any of the books of the Bible to be the ;w written & inf alible 
Word of God," was, in 165 1, made punishable by fine or whip- 
ping, and, for a second offence, by death. What an exodus 
there would be if these old laws should be revived to-day ! 

In 1646, Samuel Maverick of Boston, a member of the 
Church of England, with a few others, petitioned the General 
Court, asking for civil rights for Episcopalians, and praying that 
li none of the English nation *** be banished unlesse they break 
the known lawes of England." A storm of denunciation arose 
from the clergy, and the result was that the petitioners were fined 
for persisting ;i obstinately and proudly in their evil practice" — 
that is to say, for maintaining the right of petition and the justice 
of their request. 

The Antinomians were the first sect to give trouble to the 
Puritans. In 1634, Mrs. Anne Hutchinson arrived in Boston. 
She was a woman of great ability and high character, and won 
many friends, but fell under the displeasure of the ministers, who 
accused her of advocating the doctrine that one could be saved 
by faith without good works, and that nothing which a believer 
might do could be sin. Although it is very doubtful whether 
her statements, except by a forced construction, supported that 
doctrine, she was nevertheless condemned and banished, and her 
adherents suppressed. 

The Antinomian controversy had hardly been settled, before 
the Baptists began to give orthodox 1 people great anxiety. The 
Baptists, in early Colonial days, figured under the formidable 
names of Anabaptists and Antipaedobaptists. Roger Williams, 
a minister in Salem, who was banished to Rhode Island in 1636 
because of his unpopular opinions, is commonly said to have 
been the leader of the Baptists in America. But it has been 
doubted by some historians whether his opinions were really those 
of the later Baptist church. 

- 1 This word is used, of course, in its popular or historical sense. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 3/ 

As carl}' as 164:4, the Bapti.-ts had become worthy of the 
attention of the General Court, which passed a law condemning 
them to banishment if they declared their faith. This, however, 
did not prevent the spread cf the belief. Indeed, the first presi- 
dent of Harvard College, Henry Dunster, was removed from 
his office because of his disapproval of infant baptism. 

In Swampscott, then a part of Lynn, lived William Witter, 
an aged Baptist, who had long been harassed on account of his 
religious views. Being old and blind, he requested the Baptists 
in Rhode Island to send some of the brethren to him, to admin- 
ister the communion, John Clark and two others came in re- 
sponse to his request. They were at Witter's home on Sunday, 
July 20, 1651, and, with a few friends, held a private service. 
While Mr. Clark was preaching, two constables entered and 
arrested them. In the afternoon, the constables tool: the pris- 
oners to the Puritan meeting, where they had the pleasure of 
listening to the preaching of Thomas Cobbet, the author of a 
tract entitled, "A large, nervous, golden, conscientious dis- 
course, against the Baptists." One might think that a sufficient 
punishment, but on the 31st they were brought before Governor 
Endicott for trial. A trial before Governor Endicott could have 
but one ending. Although the only penalty provided by statute 
for the offense of being a Baptist was banishment, two of them 
were fined, and one, Obadiah Holmes, was given thirty lashes 
with a three-thonged whip. 

Although the Baptists were suppressed for a while, they 
gained strength so rapidly that the time soon came when they 
had to be tolerated. By 167S they felt strong enough to build a 
meeting-house in Boston ; and from that time we hear no more 
of conflict with the Baptists. 

Turning back a few years, we come to the persecution of 
the Quakers — the darkest stain upon the annals of the Puritan 
Commonwealth, not excepting even the Witchcraft delusion. 
The witches were accused of making a covenant with the devil; 
if such a covenant had been possible, and if they had been guilty, 
thev would have deserved their fate. But, granting all which 



o 



8 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



has been said against the Quakers, there is no excuse for the 
treatment to which they were subjected. 

In July, 1656, the magistrates were thrown into a great 
panic by the arrival of two poor Quaker women in Boston. 
Shortly afterwards, a law was passed against the 41 cursed sect of 
the Quakers," condemning them to banishment, with a promise 
I of death if they dared to return. Nevertheless, the Quakers 

appear to have gained a number of converts. It has been as- 
serted by some writers, and denied by others, that the early 
Quakers were coarse, blustering, disagreeable fanatics. But 
whether that charge is true or not, there can be no doubt of their 
courage. Before 1661, four Quakers were hanged, and many 
imprisoned, scourged, and banished. Among; those hanged was 
one woman, Mary Dyer, who had once before been condemned 
to death, but had escaped it by consenting to go to Rhode Island. 
Ashamed of what she considered her cowardice, she returned to 
Massachusetts to proclaim her faith, and met death on the gal- 
lows without fear. 

It may seem strange, that, with the exception of certain laws 
to prevent Jesuit priests from working among the Indians on the 
frontier, no statutes were passed concerning Roman Catholics. But 
the absence of any laws against Papists within the settled towns 
is easily accounted for; the idea was too awful to contemplate. 

The conduct of the Colony of Massachusetts in persecuting 
members of dissenting sects did not meet with the approval of the 
English authorities; and further persecution was forbidden by 
the Province Charter 01 William and Mary, in 1691, in these 
words, — "Wee doe by these presents *** Grant Establish and 
Ordaine that forever hereafter there shall be a liberty of Con- 
science allowed in the Worshipp of God to all Christians (ex- 
cept Papists) Inhabiting or which shall Inhabit or be Resident 
within our said Province or Territory." 

It is a relief to turn from such sanguinary conflicts as those 
which have been described, to one which involved no bodily 
harm, although it was quite as fiercely contended. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 39 

To l>e taxed for the support of another's religion is almost 
as hard as to be prevented from maintaining one's own. Having 
seemed the right to worship at their own churches, the Bap- 
tists, Quakers, Episcopalian-, and other dissenters began to 
strive for exemption from the duty of supporting Congrega- 
tionalism. 

In older to understand this struggle, and its successful termin- 
ation, we must understand the system upon which the churches 
and parishes of Massachusetts were founded. 

In the earliest records of the Colony, in 1630, is the follow- 
ing entry : c; Imprimis, it was propounded how the ministers 
should be maintained." It was decided to maintain them at the 
public expense. 

It is true that such legislation did not create a union of 
church and State, such as existed in the Papal States in Italy ; 
but it did place Orthodox Congregationalism upon the footing of 
an established religion, which it was the special function of the 
government to foster. 

Except in Boston, where the system of voluntary offering 
prevailed, every inhabitant was taxed his share for the support of 
the ministry. Any town which failed to collect such taxes and 
to support a " learned, orthodox" minister, was liable to punish- 
ment. 1 

It cannot be said that these enactments were not subject to 
contemporary criticism. In i6^S, at. Plymouth court, Lieuten- 
ant Mathew Fuller was fined forty shillings for saying, "All 
such laws are wicked and devilish laws, and the Devil sat at the 
stern when they were enacted." And Governor Wlnthrop, in 
his diary, relates that the system of taxation w was very offensive 
to some." 

As we have seen, every town was given the right and duty 
to maintain divine worship within its borders. Business relating 
to ministers and meeting-houses was transacted in town-meeting, 
and was not distinguished from matters of merely municipal 



1 St. irkjz-i,, c. 26; st. 1692-3, c. 46; st. 1701-2, c. 10; st. 1706-7, c. 9; st. 1715-16, 
99j c. S7, •§ 2; Com. v. W;itcrl>orou^ii, 5 Mass. 257. 



40 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

concern.' The town in those early days, had two sets of func- 
tions — the one, municipal, the other, parochial. - 

As the towns grew larger, it became impracticable for all 
the people to worship in one meeting-house. In such cases, a 
part of the town would be set off by the General Court as a sep- 
arate parish. If a certain portion of the territory of the town 
was thus set off, it was called a territorial parish. If the new 
parish was formed of certain designated individuals, it was 
•called a poll parish. In either case, the result to the town was 
the same. 3 The town could not continue to maintain public 
worship for a part only of its inhabitants. For this reason, 
immediateh' upon the formation of a parish within a town, the 
remainder of the inhabitants and territory, not included in the 
new parish, became, by operation of law, the first parish, 4 The 
town was no longer bound to maintain public worship, but that 
duty fell upon the parishes. All property which the town had 
owned in its parochial capacity became the property of the first 
parish. 5 

In a very interesting paper which Hon. Nathan Mortimer 
Hawkes read before this Society, he mentioned the attempt on the 
part of the town of Lynn, in 1S06, to use the meeting-house of 
the First Parish as a place for town-meetings, even after the for- 
mation of other parishes in Lynn. The question of the right of 
a town to do this, was brought before the Supreme Court in the 
case of the town of Medford, in 1S26, and decided in favor of 
the parish and against the town. 6 

As the towns became divided into parishes, the latter took 



1 Austin v. Thomas, 14 M;i.-s. $jj„ 33$,; Tobey v. W arduun Rank, 13 Met. 4.50, jj_j6 ; 
Fisher v. Whitman, 13 Pick. 350, 355, Cf. Jewett v. Burroughs, 15 Mass. 464, 46S. 

2 Ludlow v. Sikes, 10 Pick. 317; Atty. Gen. v. Proprietors, 3_Gray, 1, 35; Weld v. May, 
J 9 Cush. 1 Si, iSS. 

3 Minot v. Curti.-, 7 Mass. 441 ; .Sutton Parish v. Cole, S Mass. 96. 

5 St. 171S-19, c. 1; st. 17S6, c. 10. § 5; Brunswick Parish v. Dunninar. 7 Mass. 445; Med- 
ford Parish v. Pratt, 4 Pick. 222, 227 ; Ludlow v. Sikes, 19 Pick. 317: Medford Parish v. 
Medford, 2r Pick. 19/, 204. 

•"' Tobey v. Ware-ham Bank, 13 Met. 440; Sudbury Parish v. Jones. S Cu-.Ii. 1S4; Med- 
ford Parish v. Medford, 21 Pick. 19^; Stearns v. Woodbury, 10 Met. 27; Wells v. Heath, 
jo Gray. 17,21. 

'-' Medford Parish v. Pratt. 4 Pick. 222. See also, Milford v. Godfrey, 1 Pick. 91 : GolT 
v. Rehoboth, 12 Met. 26. 



- 









LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 41 

upon themselves all parochial duties. They became corporations 
empowered to build and manage meeting-houses, to settle and 

I maintain ministers, and to tax their members for the defraying 

of all necessary parish charges. 1 
"... 
The question is likely to suggest itself, If the parish was the 

body which had the management of all the business affairs, what 
were the powers of the church? The answer is in the words of 
Chief Justice Shaw : "The church is a voluntary association, 
consisting of the whole or some part of the members of the 
society [which is another name for a parish], united together by 
covenant or agreement, according to usages well known and 
generally recognized, for the purpose mainly of celebrating the 
Christian ordinance of the Lord's Supper, and for mutual dis- 
cipline, in regular church order. The church is a voluntary 
association; not a corporation." - 

It is evident that the temporal powers of the church were 
few. The church had not even the right of choosing the minis- 
ter. The earliest usage was, it is true, for the church to elect 
the minister; and this usage was declared in the Body of Liber- 
ties of 1641. But by st. 1692-3, c. 26 and st. 1692-3, c. 46, the 
consent of the town or parish was required ; and by the Con- 
stitution of Massachusetts, which was adopted in 17S0, the right 
of choosing the minister was given wholly to the town or parish. 3 

In their membership, the church and the parish differed as 
widely as in their powers. The church was necessarily a body 
of professed Orthodox Christians. No others could be received. 
On the other hand, the very origin of the parish gave it a varied 



1 Constitution of Mass., Amendment XI; Rev. Laws. c. 36, § 17. But the right of a 
religious soeh&t to tax its members was taken away by st, 1SS7, C. 419: Rev. Laws, c. 36, 
§ fS. On the power of a parish to maintain schools, see White v. Braintree Parish, 13 Met. 
506. 

- Parker v. May, 5 Cush. 336. 34^. See also. Weld v. May, 9 Cush. 1S1. 

3 Avery v. Tyringham, 3 Mass. 160. 1S0; Baker v. Fales, 16 Mass. 4SS, 50?; Burr v. 
Sandwich Parish, 9 Mass. 277, 297. 20S; Leicester v. Fitchburg, 7 Allen, 90, 92. Cf. a New 
Hampshire case, Holt v. Downs, 5S X. H. 170. If, in the election of a minister, no pro- 
vision is made for a terra in at ion of the relation, the election is for life, unless the minister 
commits some violation of duty. Avery v. Tyringham, 3 Mass. 160; Sheldon v. Easton 
Parish, 24 Pick; 2S1. See also, Freeman v. Bourne, 170 M.ijs 2S0; Cochran v. Camden, 15 
Mass. 20; Thompson v. Rehoboth, 7 Pick. i£o; Whitmorc v. Plymouth Society, 2 Gray, 
3™. 



42 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

composition. Originally all the freemen of the town took part in 
the discussion of parochial affairs in town-meeting. When the 
towns became divided into parishes, the membership was no less 
general. All the voters living within the confines of a territorial 
parish were members of it. The parish could not exclude any 
one of them, nor could any one escape from membership. The 
maintenance of religion being one of the functions of govern- 
ment, a parish was as much a public corporation as a town, and 
had the same general membership. 1 As the right of suffrage 
became extended so as to include unorthodox persons, the views 
'of the members became correspondingly varied. But the Puritan 
spirit was so strong in Massachusetts, that until the beginning of 
the nineteenth century the majority in almost all the towns and 
parishes were in full sympathy with the Orthodox creed. 

Membership in a parish was by no means an unmixed bless- 
ing. It meant parish taxes and charges, and, unless these were 
paid, levies, sales of property, and imprisonment for debt. In 
fact, all. persons having property within the limits of the parish 
were taxed. Even non-residents and manufacturing corporations 
were compelled to bear their share of the burden of supporting 
an "able, learned orthodox" ministry.' 2 

The strongest objection to the ecclesiastical taxes came, as 
might be expected, from the Baptists, Quakers, and other dis- 
senters. The first exemption which any unorthodox persons 
obtained was granted by the act of 1727-2S, c. 7, which pro- 
vided that the taxes paid by Episcopalians should be given to the 
minister of that denomination, if such a minister lived in the 
neighborhood. The next year, Baptists and Quakers were, by 
statute, exempted from taxation. These acts of exemption were, 
by their terms, limited in their effect to a few years ; but success- 
ive acts continued the exemption almost to the close of the eigh- 
teenth century. The persons exempted by these statutes were not 
allowed to vote on religious matters in town or parish meetings. 



i Oakes v. Hill, 1.0 Pick. 333; Keith v. Howard,^ Pick. 392: Fisher v. Whitman, 
Pick. 350, 355 ; Richardson v. IUitterfield, 6 Cush. 191. 

- Gaiidell Mfg. Co. v. Tra.sk, 11 Pick. 514 : 'Araesbury Xail Co. v. Weed, 17 Mass. 5 
Coburn v. Richardson, 16 Mass. 213. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 43 

It is plain that so far the dissenters bad obtained but a limit- 
ed relief. Episcopalians, Baptists and Quakers were the only 
denominations benefited. The dissenters were naturally not con- 
tent with this state of the law, and procured the enactment of the 
statute of 1799, c 87, which was founded on the Declaration of 
Rights, Article III. This act provided that all persons, except 
Quakers, should pay an. ecclesiastical tax, but that every person, 
of whatever religious belief, should have the right to have his 
parish taxes " applied to the support of the public teacher of his 
own religious sect or denomination." The dissenters, except the 
Quakers, were not deprived of their parish membership. The 
parish still had the right to tax them, although it became the 
duty of the parish treasurer to pay the money collected over to 
the dissenting minister. The parish treasurer was sometimes 
obstinate, and not inclined to increase the revenues of the dis- 
senting clergy. It required in one instance fourteen suits at law 
before the parish treasurer could be compelled to do his duty, 
and, in another ca^e, an expense of one hundred dollars and 
four years time to get four dollars out of his hands for the use 
, of a Baptist minister. 

The Supreme Court construed the act of 1799 very strictly. 
The Methodists were alarmed by the decision that their itinerant 
preachers, who rode the circuit, preaching in a number of towns 
in succession, were not within the meaning of the statute. 1 
Furthermore, it was held that the dissenting minister, in order 
to be entitled to the taxes, must be settled over an incorporated 
religious society;' 2 and very few of the dissenting societies were 
incorporated. 

Both these points were rectified by the statute of 1S11, c. 6, 
which actually went so far as to provide that a person could 
withdraw from the parish, and, by joining some other religious 
society, escape taxation in the original parish. The Supreme 
Court gave a reluctant consent to its constitutionality, saying with 



1 Washburn v. West Springfield Parish, 1 Mass.. 33; Turner v. Brookncid Precinct, 7 
Mass. 6f>i 

- Barnes v. Falmouth Parish, 6 Mass. 401. 



44 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

considerable despondency, that it might become injurious to 
" public morals and religion/' and tend '* to destroy all the 
decency and regularity of public worship." At the present 
time, we should be more likely to consider the statute of 1S11 
unconstitutional because it compelled a man to submit of taxation 
in some one religious society, and denied him the right now well 
known and often exercised, to have no church associations. It 
is a striking indication of Orthodox sentiment at that time, that 
it was seriously contended by counsel that the Legislature had 
no right to grant exemptions from taxation for the support of the 
established religion. As we have seen, the court, while holding 
the statute constitutional, expressed a decided opinion against 
the policy of an enactment "so destructive to regular and orderly 
worship." 1 

The attitude of the Supreme Court at that time was one of 
tender solicitude for the safety of the orthodox establishment. 
In the case of Barnes v. First Parish in Falmouth,' 2 in 1810, 
Chief Justice Parsons made an elaborate defense of the Massa- 
chusetts ecclesiastical system. Chief Justice Doe of New Hamp- 
shire, in commenting upon the Falmouth case, rather humorously 
said, '"The decision in Barnes v. Falmouth is pervaded by a 
profound conviction of the wretchedness of man not assisted in 
the protection and enjoyment of life, liberty and property, and 
the acquisition of an inheritance in a better country, by religious 
corporations, legally authorized and required to exercise ample 
powers of taxation." 3 

Before passing to the account of the crisis in ecclesiastical 
history which preceded the disestablishment of Congregational- 
ism in Massachusetts, let us consider the state of religion after 
the passage of the statute of 1S1 1. 

First, there were the old territorial parishes, which, like 
towns, were bound to receive as members all who might reside 
within their territorial limits, and choose to partake of their cor- 

1 Adams v. Howe, 14. Mass. 340. 

i 6 Mass. 401. 

•"' Holt v. Downs. 5S X. II. 170. 



I 

LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 45 

porate privileges. These territorial parishes were all religious 
societies supporting the Orthodox Congregational faith. 
I Then there were other religious societies or poll parishes, 

incorporated and unincorporated, of Orthodox Congregational- 
ists, Baptists, Methodists; Episcopalians, Unitarians, Universal- 
ists, and other denominations, whose members, having withdrawn 
from the territorial parishes, were no longer taxable therein under 
the statute of 1S1 1. But there was no way in which a man could 
escape taxation in the territorial parish except by becoming a 
member of some other religious society. 

A case which occurred in Maiden is instructive in regard to 
the position of a territorial parish at that time. In Maiden there 
were three different religious societies or poll parishes, composed 
respectively of Baptists, Methodists, and Congregationalists. 
Besides these, there was the territorial parish, comprising the 
whole town, which, upon the organization of poll parishes with- 
in its borders, had become known as the First Parish. Capt. 
Uriah Oakes was a member of the Congregational poll parish. 
He obtained a certificate from the clerk of that poll parish that 
he had ceased to be a member, and, presenting that certificate at 
a meeting of the first Parish, claimed the right to vote as a mem- 
ber of the First Parish. The clerk of the First Parish refused to 
allow Capt. Oakes to vote. Upon a suit brought by the Captain, 
the court decided that upon leaving the poll parish, he became 
by 'that act a member of the territorial parish, and had the right 
to vote in its meetings. 1 

We have now come down to the time when the Orthodox 
faith was about to lose its character as an established religion. 
We might expect to find that result brought about by the clamors 
of the dissenting denominations for religious equality. But such 
was not the case. The dissenters were yet in the minority in the 
State. It needed a violent shock to convince the Congregation- 
alists that there was something wrong in the whole system before 
a radical change could be made. 



Oakes v. Mill, 10 Pick. 333; 14 Pitk. 44-!. Sec also, Keith v. Howard, 24 Pick. 292. 



46 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

i 

The Mow came from an unexpected quarter. For years the 
Supreme Court had worked hard for the support of the Orthodox 
church. Statutes in favor of dissenters had met with little en- 
couragement from the judiciary. Yet the downfall of the State 
church was due to a decision of the Supreme Court. As Mr. 
Buck, a writer upon this subject, says, ' ; Under the Bill of 
Rights of 17S0, Congregationalists had slumbered, as under 
their own peculiar vine ; bearing unto them taxes and other good 
and religious fruits ; they deemed it was intended for the especial 
refreshment of Christians of the established order. Little did 
they dream, in those halcyon days of Commonwealth favor, that 
a freezing blast was soon to sweep over them, blowing out of 
the judicial quarter of the heavens, heretofore so bland and 
genial to the churches proper of the Commonwealth." 1 

The case arose in the town of Dedham. In the First 
Parish in Dedham, as in many other parishes in the Common- 
wealth, the Unitarian belief had been rapidly gaining ground. 
A majority of the parish had become converted to the new faith, 
- although two-thirds of the church members had remained 
Orthodox. The usage of most parishes was to elect the minister 
by concurrent vote of the church and the parish ; but the First 
Parish of Dedham threw off all allegiance to the church, and 
exercised its constitutional rights by choosing a minister against 
the objection of the Orthodox majority of the church. Mr. 
Larason, the minister chosen, was a Unitarian ; a circumstance 
which the church considered as adding insult to injury. 

The Trinitarian majority of the church could not submit to 
this indignity. To make the matter worse, the parish, with its 
Unitarian minister, claimed all the property, and in fact used the 
meeting-house for religious services. There was no course open 
to the church but to dissolve its connection with the parish, 
which, by a vote, it proceeded to do. Pending a decision of the 
court as to the ownership of the property, the seceding church 
established itself across the street from Mr. Lamson's society, 
and claimed to be the true First Church in Dedham. 



1 Ecclesiastical ]. aw (2d Ed.) 4- 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 47 

\ 

j The minority of the church, which adhered to the parish, 

also claimed to be the rightful First Church in Dedham, and 
accordingly elected deacons. These deacons sued one of the 
deacons of the seceding Orthodox church in an action of 
replevin, to obtain the records and other property of the 
church. 

This case, under the name of Baker v. Tales, 1 came before 
the Supreme Court in 1S20. While the suit was technically for 
the sole purpose of recovering certain personal property, it really 
involved the question whether the seceding Orthodox church had 
any rights in the meeting-house or any other part of the 
property. 

The case was argued for the defendant by Mr. Webster, 
with all the ability for which he was famed. Associated with 
him was Theron Metcalf, afterwards a Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court. But the court decided for the plaintiff. It was 
held that, under the Constitution, the parish had the sole right of 
electing the minister. The parish was not bound to select a 
.minister of the Orthodox faith, but might, if it desired a change 
of doctrine, choose a minister of any other belief to preside over 
the parish. As for the church, that was not a corporation, but 
a mere appendage to the parish. A church, apart from its parish, 
could have no legal existence. If all the members of a church 
should die or withdraw, it would be competent for other mem- 
bers of the parish to unite themselves into a church, which would 
be the legitimate successor of the former church, and would be 
the church of the parish. If, as in the case at bar, only a major- 
ity of the church members should secede, leaving a minority with 
the parish, the minority remaining would constitute the church. 
The deacons elected by the church members who remained asso- 
ciated with the parish, were therefore entitled to the church 
records. The meeting-house was the property of the parish, 
and even if the church could be said to have any rights in the 
building, surely the seceding church members had none, for, 
although they were a majority, they ceased to be the First 

I ti6Mass.4SS. 



48 I.YVN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Church at the time when they separated from the First Parish. 1 
Such was the decision which brought home to the Congre- 
gationalists the dangers of their parish system. By it the Ortho- 
dox First Church of Dedham was turned out of house and home 
for the benefit of the Unitarian First Parish. It is not difficult 
to understand the storm of protests which arose from Congrega- 
tional ists, both lawyers and laymen. In Stebbins v. Jennings,' 2 
commonly known as the Brook field case, which came before the 
Supreme Court in 1S30, the facts were much the same as those 
in the Dedham case ; in fact, only two church members remained 
with the parish. The counsel for the Orthodox church argued 
the case with fulness, in the endeavor to induce the court to over- 
ride Baker v, Fales. But Chief Justice Shaw, in giving the 
unanimous opinion of the court, sustained Baker v. Fales, and 
decided that the seceding church had no rights. 

The Unitarians and Universalists were not slow to take 
advantage of the law as laid down by the court. All that they 
had to do was to gain a majority in any parish, and they were 
supreme. In this, the nature of the old territorial parishes was 
a great aid. Under the statutes which we have already men- 
tioned, all the inhabitants, unless members of some Other relig- 
ious society, were members of the territorial parish. Of these 
inhabitants, many were Unitarians and Universalists in belief, 
while others were indifferent in religious matters, and naturally 
inclined towards the more liberal denominations and against the 
established order of things. Even if the Unitarians and Univer- 
salists within the territorial parish were united into separate 
societies of their own, they could regain their membership in the 
territorial parish by ceasing to be members of any other society ; 
the prospect of acquiring a meeting-house, completely furnished, 
was a great inducement for them to do so. 

x\t many of the parish meetings, between 1S20 and 1S34, 



1 For these propositions, see also Stebbens v. Jennings, id Pick. 172; Sau-yer v. B;U<<- 
win, 11 Pick. 492; Vaj;c v. Crosby, 24 Pick. 211 : Attorney General v. Proprietors, 3 Gray 1, 
57; Warner v. Bowdbin Square Baptist Society, 14S Mass, 400. Cf. Holt v. Downs. 5S X. 

ii. 170. 

- 10 Pick. 172. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. J.9 

more political strategy could be found than at the town-meetings. 
Some dissenting parish members, usually cither Universalists or 
Unitarians, would seek to elect a minister of their belief, and to 

change the doctrines taught from the meeting-house pulpit. To 
effect this, the neighborhood would be canvassed, and all possible 
voters turned out. The Congregationalists would rally to save the 
meeting-house. At the parish meeting, the battle would be fought. 
In some parishes, a single vote turned the scale, and decided 
whether Congregationalism or some newer creed should prevail. 

Just how many parishes in Massachusetts went over to the 
dissenting denominations, I do not know ; but the number must 
have beers large. It is now very common, in Massachusetts 
towns, to see, upon a meeting-house, the words, " First Congre- 
gational Church — Unitarian." One who is not familiar with 
the story of the Unitarian defection, sees the words, and passes 
by; but to the student of Massachusetts history, these four words 
bring before the mind a vivid picture of seventy-five years ago. 
He sees the parish meeting, crowded with voters drawn together 
by the opposing factions. The question is put to a vote, and a 
bare majority suffices to elect a minister of Unitarian views. 
What is left for the Orthodox church members to do, but to 
leave their ancestral meeting-house to the invaders, and, by with- 
drawing, to seek to escape further humiliation? 

Congregationalists, even to-day, are apt to bemoan the loss 
of so many churches to the dissenting sects. Looking at the 
matter after the lapse of seventy- five years, I agree with them, 
that it would have been more fitting if a greater number of the 
historic churches of this Commonwealth had preserved their 
religious doctrines as well as their church and parish organiza- 
tions. But looking at the struggle from the standpoint of 
seventy-five years ago, the Unitarians and Universalists are 
hardly to be blamed for their exercise of the rights of a majority. 
For years they had been taxed for the support of the Orthodox 
ministry ; their money had been wrung from them for the 
building of Orthodox meeting-houses. Then, when they gained 
the upper hand, why should they not take possession of the 
4 



50 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

property for the maintenance of which they had been taxed? 

The decision in the Dedham case seems \:o have been the 
real cause of the final divorce of church and State. The dis- 
senting denominations had long desired the equality of all sects 
before the law. The Congregationalists now began to see the 
dangers winch lurked in the system of territorial parishes. For 
thirty years there bad been continual litigation concerninc relief- 
ious societies and ecclesiastical taxes. The reports of the 
Supreme Court early in this century abound in all kinds of suits 
ecclesiastical, of which the like cannot be found in the courts 
to-day. There were suits by parish treasurers to recover taxes; 
suits by dissenters to recover damages for unlawfully levying on 
reel heifers for parish taxes ; suits to compel parish treasurers to 
pay to the dissenting ministers the taxes collected from dis- 
senters; and other actions too numerous to mention. All parties 
had by this time become tired of the old system, and when the 
Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution, which disestablished 
Congregationalism, was presented to the people in 1S33, it was 
adopted by the very decisive vote of 32,234 to 3,273. The 
statute of 1S34, c. 1S3, which followed, provided that a person 
might leave a parish at will, and that no one should thereafter 
be made a member of a parish without his consent in writing 
See Rev. Laws, c. 36, § 4. 

The act" of 1S34 completed the work of religious freedom. 
No longer could a person be compelled to submit to taxation for 
religious purposes. On the other hand, a person could no 
longer thrust himself into a religious society against its will. 
Territorial parishes became practically the same as poll parishes, 
for the rules governing their membership were made identical. 1 
The maintenance of religion ceased to be a function of govern- 
ment, and was left to private parishes or religious societies, sup- 
ported entirely by private liberality. By the same act, the old 
laws imposing fines for failure to attend public worship, were 
repealed. 

1 Sudbury Parish v. Stearns, z\ Pick. 14S; Ludlow v. Sikes. 19 Pi,ck. 317; Richardson v. 
Butterfield, 6 Cush. 191. . 



! 

i 

I LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Si 

! * 

With the great changes made by the statute of 1S34, an 
account of the Established Church of Massachusetts ought per- 
haps to end ; but I cannot refrain from discussing briefly the 
condition of churches and religious societies since the passage of 
( that statute. 

The old distinctions between the church, and the parish — 
or, as it is more often called, the society, — still remain. The 
society is the legal corporation, owning the property, and having 
the sole right of electing the minister. The custom of electing 
the minister by concurrent vote of the church and the parish is 
simply a matter of courtesy. The society has the same right to 
change the doctrines taught in the meeting-house that it had in 
i 1820. A Congregational society, if it pleases, may become Bap- 

tist, Universalist, Roman Catholic, or anything else, against the 
remonstrance of all the members of the church. All this is true 
not only of Congregational societies, but also of Unitarian, Uni- 
versalist, and Baptist societies, since they have all adopted the 
Congregational form of church government. The only safe- 
guard against a change of religion lies in the fact that few persons 
are likely to be admitted to membership unless they are in accord 
with the religious views which have been taught in the society. 

It is sometimes thought that the pewholders in a meeting- 
house have some control over the affairs of the society ; but this 
appears to be untrue. 1 The right to a pew is merely a right to 
use a portion of the meeting-house, and involves no ownership 
in the soil, the building, or any of the furnishings.' 2 A pew- 
holder may be a member of the society, and in that capacity have 
a share in its management; but a pewholder, as such, has merely 
the right to sit in his pew, and nothing more. 

But the right of the pewholder to the occupation of his pew 
is exclusive, and he can maintain an action of trespass for any 
infringement of his rights. How ungraciously the right to the 



1 In re New South Meeting-house in Boston, 13 "Allen, 497, 50S; Wood v. Gushing, 
6 Met. 44S; Rev. Laws. c. 30. § 4. 

- Wentworth v. Canton Parish. 3 Pick. 344; Locke v. Beimont Congregational Society, 
157 Mass. 589,594; Daniel v. Wood, 1 Pick, ioj; Gay v. Baker. 17 Mass. 435 ; Revere v. 
Gannett, 1 Pick. lChj. 



52 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

exclusive use of a pew has been exercised, may be seen in a case 
which reached the Supreme Court, in which a pewholder, not 
wishing his pew to be used at a Fourth of July meeting, boarded 
it up. 1 

The society, being the general owner of the soil, has the 
right to alter or destroy the meeting-house or any of its furnish- 
ings. An indemnity must be given to the pewholders whose 
rights have been impaired; but if the meeting-house is so old and 
ruinous that it is no longer tenantable no indemnity need be made, 
as the pewholders have lost nothing of value.' 2 The pewholders 
have no redress for the simple abandonment of the meeting-house 
by the society. 3 

We have now traced the history of the parish system down 
to the present day. In the last hundred years parishes have 
changed from municipal to purely private corporations. Within 
the twentieth century it is very likely that they will cease to exist. 
Already the Congregationalists, among whom there is now the 
greatest opposition to the parish system, have had a statute passed 
which permits the incorporation of churches, and provides for 
the transfer of the property from the society to the incorporated 
church, after which the society is supposed to pass out of 
existence. 4 When this statute is generally adopted, it will destroy 
the last vestige ot that remarkable ecclesiastical system upon 
which was based the Established Church of Massachusetts. 



1 Jackson v. Rounsvifle, 5 Met 127, 

2 Kimball v. Rowley Parish, 24 Pick. 347; Gay v. Raker, 37 Mass. 435; Daniel v. 
Wood. 1 Pick. 102: Wcntworth v. Can ton Parish, 3 Pick. 344: Howard v. North Bridge- 
water Parish, 7 Pick. 137; Gorton v. Hadseii, 9 Cush. 50S; Sohier v. Trinity Church, 100 
Mass. 1. 21 ; Ayhvard v. O'Brien, 160 Mass. 11S; Rev. Paws, c. 36, §§, 19. i,^. 34. 

•" Fassett v. Boylston Parish. 19 Pick. 361 ; Ayhvard v. O'Brien, 160 Ma.->s. n>. 

4 St. 1SS7, c. 404: Rev. Laws c. 36. §§ 47-54. See Stone v. Framingham, 109 Mass. 303. 
There is a serious question as to the constitutionality of this act, in so far as it authorizes 
the society, hy a three-fourths vote, to transfer its property to the incorporated church, 
without consideration, against the will of a minority of the society; who are thus deprived 
of property rights. See Dow v. Northern Railroad, 07 X. H. 1. Cf. Durfee v. Old 
Colony R. R., 5 Allen, 230; Treadwell v. Salisbury Mfg. Co.. 7 Gray, 303; Clark v. Qiiincy 
Society, 12 Gray, 17; Warner v. Bowdoin Square Baptist Society, 14S .Mass. 40-;; Canadian 
Religious Society v. Parmenter, 180 Mass. 415; Sohier v. Trinity Church, 109 Mass. 1. See 
also McFadden v. Murphy, 149 Mass. 341; Kane v. Shields, 167 Mass. 39.-. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. ^^ 



MEMBER S. 



April 27, 1897. Abbott, Waldo Love jo v 25 Hanover St. 

4i - Aborri, (Charles Henry . . 130 Atlantic Ave., Swampscott 

" Adams. Bessie Frances 32 Cherry St. 

Oct. 20. 1902. Albree, John, Jr 279 Humphrey St., Swampscott 

March 26, 1901. Aid worth, Eliza A 394 Walnut St. 

July 29, 1901. Allen Eliza M 2 Walden St. 

,/<///. 28, 1S9S. Allen, LillieB 120 South Common St. 

April 27. 1897. Allen. Walter- B 3 Walden St. 

(9c/. 20, 1902. Alley, Addie H 1 Chestnut Ave. 

Oct. 12, 1901. Alley, Emma R 273 Ocean St. 

y^/i' 2S. 1902. Arrington, Alfred A 44 Rockaway St. 

Jan. 2~i< 1902. Atkins. Annie J 157 Euclid Ave. 

Atkins. Frank W .' ... 157 Euclid Ave. 

April i']. 1S97. Attwill, Alfred Mudge 19 Kensington Sq. 

June 16, 1902. Attwill, Louis Hulen 134 Myrtle St. 

April 27, 1S97. Atwood, Luther 8 Sagamore St. 

^Nov. 23, 1899. Babcock, Bessie B 4S Breed St. 

April 27, 1897. Bacheller, Edward F \o Broad St. 

Sept. 9. 1S9S. Baker, Alfred Landon . . 2641 Prairie Ave.. Chicago. 111. 

April 2 7, 1897. Baker. Frederick E 1S9 Lewis St. 

March 18,1899. Baker. Harry Mudge 115 Ocean St.. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Baker, Lydia Maria 112 Johnson St. 

March iS, 1S99. Baker. Lynette Dawes 115 Ocean SL 

Sept. 30, 1901. Baker, William Ezi-a .......... 112 John>on St. 

March 12. 1900. Barker, Ralph E 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1S9;. Barney, Charles Neal 103 Green St. 

" Barney, William Mitchell 103 Green St. 

" Barry, John Mathew 23 Tudor St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Barry, William J : - . 23 Tudor St. 

Jan. 28. 1S98. Bartlett, Ella Doak 61 Atlantic St. 

Oct. iS. 1S97. Bartlett, Hannah II 115 Naharit St. 

Jan. 2S, 189S. Bartlett, John S 61 Atlantic St. 

April 21, 1902. Bauer, Fcnnie M 3.5 Grosvenor Park 

" Bauer, Ralph S 35 Grosvenor Park 

June 1, 1897. Beat, Adeline Brown 89 Broad St. 

March 26. 1 901. Beard, Cordelia M. E . 389 Esses: St. 



5-1 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Match 26, 1901 Beard, Daniel Breed 3S9 Essex St. 

March 8. 1901. Bennett, George Edwin 44 Ire»on Ave. 

April 27. 1S97. Bennett. Josiah. Chase 7S Beacon Hill Ave. 

" Bennett. Larkin Everett 12 Avon St.. Wakefield 

March 8. 1901. Bennett, Mary Eugenia Pearl . . . . . .44 Ireson Ave. 

Jan. 27. 1S99. Berry, Benjamin Hun 238 Ocean St. 

June 9. 1899. Berry, John VV 105 Franklin St. 

" - Berry. Susannah W 105 Franklin St. 

March 27, 1900. Bessoin, William B 44 Elsmere Place 

Oct. 2S, 1901. Billings, Edward Baker 103 Liberty St. 

Nov.. 24, 1S97. Bliss, George S 24 Chase St. 

Oct. 2S, 1S98. Blood, Eldredge II 157 Maple St. 

March S. 1 901. Brainard, Albion II 53 Xahant St. 

Feb. 20. 1900. Breed. Adelaide L 17 Xahant St. 

Dec. 28, 1S99.. Breed. Caroline A 22 Atlantic St. 

Marches, 1901. Breed. Charles Orrin 54 Elm St. 

Oct. 11, 1S99. Breed, Clara E 40 Xahant Place 

June. 1. 1897. Breed. Emma Hawthorne 114 Green St. 

April 26. 1900. Breed. Florence L 22 Breed St. 

Nor. 2S, 1S99. Breed, Frances Tucker 52 Baltimore St. 

Oct. 11, 1899. Breed. Frank M 4.0 Xahant Place 

Nov. 2S, 1S99. Breed, George Albert 52 Baltimore St. 

April 27, 1897. Breed. George Herbert 24 Wave St. 

March ?-. 1900. Breed,. George Herschel -4° Xahant Place 

April 27. 1S97. Breed. Henry W. 4 S Xahant St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Breed. Isabel Morgan 114 Green St. 

April 27. 1S97. Breed, Joseph Bassett 54 Xahant St. 

March 26, 1901. Breed, Li 11a M 54 Elm St. 

March 8. 1901. Breed. Marietta . 41 Franklin St. 

Feb. 9, 1S99. Breed. Mary E 47 Commercial St. 

Nov. 25, 1901. Breed, Richard 4S4 Summer St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Breed, S. E- telle 118 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Breed, Samuel Oliver 9 Garland St. 

' L Breed. Stephen Lovejoy. 15 Xewhall St. 

" • Breed. Warren Mudge 22 Breed St. 

March iS. 1S99. Bresnahan, Maurice V 12S Chestnut St. 

April 2 -j, 1S97. Brigham. Frank F 17 Franklin St. 

Sept. 30. 1 901. Brown, Bethany S. S3 Green St. 

" Brown. Kate M 83 Green St. 

April 27, 1S97. Brown, Mary Gerry 11 Light St. 

" Bubier. Frederick L ■ 23 Fayette St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Bubier. Harriet Atherton 267 Ocean St. 

April '27, 1S97. Bubier. Joanna Attwill 172 Washington St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



x> 



April 27, 1S97 Bubier, Mary A .267 Ocean St. 

i; Bubier, .Mary Adelaide 267 Ocean St. 

Dec . 30, 1901. Bubier, M. Nellie 23 Fayette St. 

April 27, 1S97. Bubier, Nathan G Swampscott 

" Bubier, Samuel Arthur 267" Ocean St. 

;i Bubier. Sylvester II.. 2d 172 Washington St. 

" Buff urn, Charles 450 Union St. 

March iS. 1S99. Bukcr. Frank Emery 25 Franklin St. 

April 2?, 1897. Bullinch, Charles F 184 -Lewis St. 

Burrill, AbbyM 44 Hanover St. 

" Burrill. John living 23 Xahant Place 

" Burrill, William A 41 Hanover St. 

' i Burrill, William Stacker 22 Xahant Place 

April 29, 1901. Burrows, Helen 1 19G Washington St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Burrows, Joseph E. ........ 196 Washington St. 

April 21, 1902. Caldwell, Elizabeth W 52 Cherry St. 

March 26, 1901. Caldwell, Sarah M. N 23 Caldwell Crescent 

Or/. 2S, 1901. Callahan, Julia F 2 1 1 Iolyoke St. 

April 2*], 1S97. Carle-ton, Joseph G. S 15 Ocean Terrace 

Sept .30, 1901. Car.su ell, J. Warren 47 Broad St. 

April 2~. 1S97. Chadwell, George H. ..... . 192 South Common St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Chase. Alice P 47 Baltimore St. 

March 12. 1900. Chase, Ellen S 24Cha.se St. 

. '* Chase, Frederick S 24 Chase St. 

April 27, 1S97. Chase. Philip A 47 Baltimore St. 

Clark. Cliarles Edward 89 Broad St. 

■ Sept. 30, 1901'. Clough, Abbie M ' 60 Cherry St. 

April 27, 1897 * Clough, Charles Bartlett 60 Cherry St. 

" C lough, Harriet Kelley 253 Ocean St. 

March 24. 1902. Clough, Martha Elizabeth 28 Baltimore St. 

April 27, 1897. Clough, Micajah Prat;t 253 Ocean St. 

March ^.- t . i<j02. Clough, Qrv rile A 28 Baltimore St. 

March 26, 1901. Cobb, Bessie Brown 10 Xahant St. 

M Cobb. Carolus M 10 Xahant St. 

March 8, 1901. Colburn. Clifton So Xahant St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Collins, Timothy A 1 Union St. 

Oct. 12, 1901. Comey, Augusta W Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Oct. ii, 1899. Comey, Henry Newton . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

Oct. 26, 1900. Conner, Adalaide M 27 Sagamore St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Cox, Frank P 211 Ocean St. 

Feb. 2,1901. Cox. May Vaughan 21.x Ocean St. 

April '2.7, 1S97. Gross* Alfred 14 Chase St. 



^6 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27, 1S97. Cross, Charles A SChaseSt. 

Ma rck 27. 1900. Currier. Benjamin W 13 Deer Cove 

Af>ril 26, 1900. Darcy ? Alice M 5.} Commercial St. 

April 27, 1897. Darcy, John VV 54 Commercial St. 

July 2$. 1S99. Davis-, LydiaC 34 Baltimore St. 

y^/vc iO. 1902. Demerest, David 36 Sachem St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Didham, Sarah Barter 112 Hollingsworth St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Dorman, William E. 157 Ocean St. 

Dec. 24, 1 S9S. *Dow, Charles DL 265 Boston St. 

March 18, 1S99. Dunn, Anna Lincoln 22 Portland St. 

March 8. 1901. Durland. Henrietta S3 Chestnut St. 

Feb. 9, 1S99. Dwver. Elmer F 34 Maple St. 

April 27, 1897. Earle, Anthony no Henry Ave. 

ik Earle. Louise Snow no Henry Ave. 

March iS, 1S99. Earle> Mabel . . no Henry Ave. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Emerson. Anna E 205 Ocean St. 

" Emer.->on. Henry P 205 Ocean St. 

Dec. 22, 1S97. Emerson, Philip 9 Beede Ave. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Emery. Mary E. B 17 Churchill Place 

Dec. 30. 1901. Earquhar, John M 156 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. Eaulkner, Walter 33 Endicott St. 

March 12. 1900. Fe-nton, Michael Angelo 740 Boston St. 

Jan. 27T 1902. Eilene. Fannie 628 Western Ave. 

Feb. 24. 1902. Foster. Susan M 173 Union St. 

July 2S, 1S99. French, Hartwell S 1 Atlantic St. 

Sept. 15, 1902. Fry, James Boyce Greenville, N. II. 

Ap ril 27. 1897. Fuller. Addie G 26 Vine St. 

" Fuller, Charles Sylvester 26 Vine St. 

' ; Galloupe, Isaac Francis 13 Park St. 

" Galloupe. Lydia Ellis 13 Park St. 

" . Garrison, William Lloyd . Boston 

Jan. 27, 1902. Gay. Charles W 25 Exchange St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Gerry G. Luclla . ." 1 8 Sachem St. 

July 28, 1899. Goldthwait, Martha E 18 Portland St. 

April 27, 1S97. Goodell, Abner Cheney, Jr 4 Federal St.. Salem 

Aug. 18. 1902. Goodell. Addie G 4 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. *Goodel I, Jonathan W 4 Broad St. 

Feb. 2. 1901. Goodridge. Charles Sewell 79 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1S97. Goodridge. Gertrude May 5 Pre-cott Place 

Marci/S. 1901. *Goodridge, Micajah X 109 High Rock Ave. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



D7 



March 12,1900. Goodwin, Daniel W 92 Xewhall St. 

/">/». 24, 1902. Goodwin, Joseph W S Burchstead Place 

'• Goodwin, Martha S 8 Burchstead Place 

Jan. 27, 1902. Gordon, Fred A 367 Broadway 

Dec. 24, 189S. Gove. William II 254 Lafayette St.. Salem 

April 27, 1S97. Graham. George Herbert 5 Seaside Terrace 

May 19, 1902. Graves, Helen E 169 Western Ave. 

April 27. 1S97. Graves, Isaiah in Fayette St. 

Sept. 30, 1901. Green. Charles Maxwell S5 North Common St. 

April 27, 1S97. Green. Henry Harrison 144 Franklin St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Green. Susan Francis 40 Tudor St. 

Dec. 28. 1900. Greene.. Robert II 369 Summer St. 

Greene. Susan A 369 Summer Si. 

Dec. 28. 1900. Grover. Charles S i6GroverSt. 

April '.27, 1897. *Guilford, Samuel A 30 Bedford St. 

" Hacker, Saiiie H 201 Ocean St. 

April 7, 1S99. Hallidav, Marion ^ King's Beach Terrace 

Dec. 28. 1899. Hallowell, Caroline A 42 Hanover St. 

April 27. 1897. Hannan, Joseph F 36 Rogers Ave. 

" Harmon. Maria B 89 North Common St. 

" Harmon, Rollin E 89 North Common St. 

March 26, 1901. *Harney, Elizabeth 73 Baker St. 

April 27, 1S97. Harris. Isaac K 2 Sagamore St. 

Nov. 2S. 1S99. Hastings, Charles. H 163 Ocean St 

Jan. 27, 1902. Hastings. Lucie 1 163 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S97. Hawkes, Nathan Mortimer 26 Tremont St. 

May 20, fSgS. Hawkes, Samuel Saugus 

'April 27,. 1897. Hawks, Esther H 16 NewhalL St. 

Dec. 2% 1900. Hayes, Amy Augusta 43 Eastern Ave. 

jFV£. 20, 1900. Hayes, Elihu B 43 Eastern Ave. 

April 27, 1S97. Heath, Caroline Putnam . . 34S Marlborough St.. Boston 

' ; Heath, Henry Warren . . • ... 109 Hollingsworth St. 

July 28, 1S99. Henderson, Abby M 79 Nahant St. 

March 18; 1S99. Herbert George C 17 Chatham St. 

Dec. 30. i<yoi. Herrick, Nellie P. 43 Autumn St. 

Sept. 9, 1S9S. Hill, Alfred C 57 Chestnut St.. East Saugus 

March 26, 1901. Hill. Charlotte Farnsworth 14 Summer Place 

" Hill, George Barnura 120 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1897. Hill, Susan T 14 Summer Place 

Dec. 28, 1900. Milliard, Alma V ti New Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S97. Hilton, Charles Sylvester 16 Henry Ave. 

" Hilton, Eliza A 16 Henry Ave. 



58 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27 ,' 1S99. H itch ings, James W. . . 176 Ocean St. 

Dec. 2S, 1900. Hixon, Lucilla D. 65 Baker St. 

Dec. 28, 1900, Hixon, Warren S 65 Baker St. 

Oct. 20. 1902. Hpdgdorf, Charles Ellsworth 40 Tudor St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. lioitt, Augusta L 13 Henry Ave. 

April 21. 1902. Holder, Anna X 18 Tapley St. 

Marc/iif, 1900. Holder, Harriet E 9 Tapley St. 

J/c/i' 19. 1902. Holder, Langdon II 18 Tapley St. 

Dec. 2$, 1900. Holder, William C 12 Park St. 

Jan. 27, 1S99. Holmes, Lucy T 67 North Common St. 

July 2S. 1902. Hood. H. Maria 23 Went worth Place 

Der. 2$. 1900. Hood, Julia Pond lS Sachem St. 

April 27. 1S97. Houghton, John Glarkson 29 Vine St. 

Nov. 2S, 1S99. Houghton. S. Ellen 1 Light St. 

April 27, 1S97. Howe. Oliver Raymond 20 Bedford St. 

Jan. 28. 189S. Hunt D. Gage 142 Maple St. 

April 27. 1S99. Huntington, Alice P) 181 Allen Ave. 

Dec. 14. 1S9S. Ingalls, Edwin W 98 Laighton St. 

April 27, 1S97. Ingalls, Emma F. . . . 229 Ocean St. 

t4 Ingalls. J. Fred 605 Western Ave. 

" Ingalls, James W 43 Whiting St. 

" Ingalls, Jerome 229 Ocean St. 

A/<7V 20. 1S9S. Ingalls, Mar;- Mower 189 Essex St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Ingalls, Robert Collyer 53 Commercial St. 

April 7, 1S99. Ireson. Samuel S 170 South Common St. 

July 28, 1902. Jackson, Elizabeth A 100 Essex St. 

Feb. 20. 1900. James, Frank M 145 North Common St. 

Nov. 24, 1897. John>on. Addie 1 4 Broad St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Johnson. Addie Mabel 179 Ocean St. 

April 27. 1S97. Johnson. Andrew Dudley . . . Winter St., East Saugus 

4i Johnson, Anna L 55 Atlantic St. 

"• Johnson, Asa Justus 179 Ocean St. 

" Johnson, Benjamin Xewhall 109 Xahant St. 

" Johnson, David X 101 Xewhall St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Johnson, Ellen M 35 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

April 2-;, 1S97. Johnson, Elliott Clarke 62 Mall St. 

April 7, 1S99. Johnson, Emma Burt 101 Xewhall St. 

April 27. 1S97. Johnson, Enoch Stafford 55 Atlantic St. 

Sept. 15, 1902. Johnson, Harriette Ellen 18 Broad St. 

April 27, 1897. Johnson, Henry W 98 South Common St. 

April 7, 1S99. Johnson, Lizzie Bishop 181 X'orth Common St. 



April 2" t 


■ 1S9: 


Dec. 22. 


1S97. 


Jhc. 2$. 


1900. 


April 7 , 


1S99. 


April 27 


1S97 


May 19, 


1902. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 59 

Johnson, Luther S 226 Ocean St. 

Johnson, Lvdin Hacker .... Winter St., East Saugus 

Johnson, Maria L 62 Mall St. 

Johnson. Mary May 22C, Ocean Si. 

Johnson. Virginia Kewhall 109 Nahant St. 

Johnson, Walter W 25 Nahant St. 

April 27. 1S97. Kecne, Frank . . • 17 Atlantic St. 

Nov. 23, 1S99. Keene, William Gerry 11 Grosvenor Park 

J March 18, 1S99. Keith. Emma Barnard 34 Nahant St. 

March 26, 1901. Keith, Ira B 34 Nahant St. 

Afril 27, 1897. Penney, Thomas 77 Brookline St. 

6>r/. ii. 1S99. Kent. Harriet Marshall 112 Green St. 

Jan. 10. 1900. Kimball. Frank W 120 Washington St. 

April 27. 1S97, Kimball, Rufus 54 Harwood St. 

Jan. 10. 1900. Kimball, Sylvia II 120 Washington St. 

Ap>rill% 1897. Knight, Thomas Benton 79 Beacon Hill Ave. 

./////<' 1. 1S97. *Lamper Sarah E . . . 16 King's Beach Terrace 

March 12, 1900. Lee. Caroline S 13 West Baltimore St. 

" Lee, Nehemiah 13 West Baltimore St. 

Dec. 26, 1900. Lewis. Carrie Shillaber 31 Burrill Ave. 

May 20. 1S9S. Lewis, Charles W. 140 Lewis St. 

April 27, 1S97. Lewis. Jacob Meek S Fayette St. 

May 19, 1902. Libbey Olive Augusta £5 Rand St. 

Aug. 27, 1S99. Lincoln, Margaret II 17 Summer Place 

Jan. 27, 1899. Little, Mary F 4 Nahant. cor. Broad St. 

" Little. William B 4 Nahant. cor. Broad St. 

April 7, 1S99. Littlefield, Horatia A 3^ Franklin St. 

April iS, 1S9S. Littlefield, Melissa J 35 Franklin St. 

April 7, 1S99. Littlefield. William Bradbury ...... 35 Franklin St. 

Sept. 4. 1900. Loring. John L 27 Violet St. 

I Jan. 27, 1902. Lo , ejoy. Alice L. . 64 Broad St. 

Aug. 26. i<yn. Lovering. Mary Adelaide S Portland St. 

May 20, 189S. Lummus, Henry Tilton 4 Hudson St. 

April 26, 1900. Lummus, Lucinda M 43 Cherry St. 

April 2~j, 1S97. Lummus. William W 43 Cherry St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Lurvey. Samuel S 19 Burchstead Place 

April 27, 1S97. Magrane, Patrick B 247 Ocean St. 

Mansfield, Perley B 19 Nichols St. 

Jau.2-j.nyo2. Marsh. Arthur W 249 Chestnut St. 

Marsh. Caleb W 243 Chestnut St. 

'Marsh, Clara E '. . . 24.3 Chestnut St. 



60 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Noz\ 23. 1899. Marsh, George E 12 Ireson Ave. 

" Marsh, James M 12 Ireson x\ve. 

Jan. 27, 1903. Marsh, .Mary E 249 Chestnut St. 

March S, 1901. Martin. Angie P 3SS Summer St. 

March 12, 1900. Martin, Augustus B 17 High Rock Ave. 

April 27, 1S97. Martin, George Henry 3SS Summer St. 

Jan. 27, 1899. Marti Uj James P . 24 Sachem St. 

Sept. 30. 1901. Martin. Sadie Woodbury 3SS Summer St. 

April '-27, 1897. Matthews, Harriet L 42 Hanover St. 

y///^- 1, 1S97. McArthur, Annie E. 67 North Common St. 

April 26;, 1900. Mclntire, Frederick M. . . . 1600 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

Dec. 30, 190,1. Megquier, Abbie E iS Sachem St. 

• Marc// 2-j. iScj-j. Merrill. Albert R 9 Henry Ave. 

; * Merrill. Harriet E . . .9* Henry Ave. 

April 27, 1897. *Moore. Arthur Scudder 54 Mall St. 

Jan. 29. 1900. Moore. Julia J 72 Fayette St. 

April '27, 1S97. Moulton. Daniel B 36 Sagamore St. 

Moulton, James T . 12 Carnes St. 

'•'- Moulton. Katherine R 71 Federal St. 

" Mower, Earl Augustus. . . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

' ; Mower. Emma F. Page . . 99 Rockland St., Swampscott 

July 28. 1902. Mower. Martin V. B 3 Mountain Ave. 

Jan. 29. 1900. Mudge, Ann Amelia 84 Green St. 

April 27, 1897. Mudge, Arthur Bartlett 27 Greystone Park, 

Dec. 2S, 1900. Mudge. Pamclia B ■ ... 115 Green St. 

Oct. 2S. 1901. Mullen, Charles H 26 Sagamore St. 

\ Dec. 28, 1900. Mullin. James D 58 Xewhall St. 

Jan. 28, 189S. Mullin, Sarah Abb; 58 Xewhall St. 

March 26, 1901. Neal, Lydia C 1.27 Nahant St. 

April 27, 1S97. Xeal, Peter Morrell 127 Nahant St. 

" Xeal, William E 127 Nahant St. 

Nov. 23, 1S99. Xeill. Charles F 17 Bassett St. 

Xeill. Eliza J ' 17 Bassett St. 

March 26. 1901. Xewhall, Annie Louise 72 Broad St. 

April 27 , 1S97. Xewhall, Asa Tarbell 489 Lynn held St. 

" Xewhall, Charles Henry 14 West Baltimore St. 

April 21, 1902. Xewhall, Clara A 3 Warren St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Xewhall, Edward S 34 Ocean Terrace 

" Xewhall, Emma 1) 281 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Xewhall. Emma E 24 Foster St., Saugus Centre 

Nov. 23, 1S99. Xewhall. Frances II 10 Deer Park 

Feb. 20. 1900. Xewhall. Francis S 18 Baltimore St. 



LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 6 1 

March 27 ^1900. Newhall, George II 3.53 Chatham St. 

<9c/. jo. 1902. Newhall, Guy 57 Silsbec Ave. 

April i~. 1897. Newhall, Harrison 19 City Hall Square 

Feb. 2, 1 901. Newhall,. Hattie C 23 Atlantic St. 

April 27,5697. Newhall, Howard Mudge 5 Prescott Place 

" Newhall, Israel Augustus 25 Franklin St. 

4i Newhall, James Silver 132 South Common Si. 

' ; Newhall, John B 23 Atlantic St. 

" Newhall. Kittie May 5 Prescott Place 

Jan. 27, 1902. Newhall, Louisa J ~~. . . 34 Ocean Terrace 

April 27, 1S97. Newhall. Lucy E. B 25 Franklin St. 

' ; Newhall, Marion Went worth . . 132 South Common St. 

Jan. a* 1S99.. Newhall. Mary Elizabeth 69 Newhall St. 

April 27, 1S97. Newhall. Sarah Effie 19 Park St. 

" Newhall. Stephen Cyrus 22 Atlantic St. 

Newhall, Terry Arden 69 Newhall St. 

" < Newhall, Wilbur Fisk . . . 74 Lincoln Ave., East Saugus 

Newhall, William Oliver 52 Atlantic St. 

Nichols, Frank Herbert 410 Summer St. 

i; Nichols, Fred Hammond 10 Prospect St. 

April 7. 1S99. Nichols, Fred M 15 Essex Court 

April 27, 1S97. Nichols, Richard Johnson 32 Cherry St. 

/ " Nichols, Thomas Parker ti Prospect St. 

J Dec. 24., 1S9S. NoTthrup, Arthur J 20 Baker St. 

" Northrup, Hattie E 20 Baker St. 

Feb. 2, 1901. Norton. Joseph C 30 Grove St. 

, " *Norton Sarah S 30 Grove St. 

April -7, 1S99. Noyes, Mary A 235 Summer St. 

March 26, 1901. O-Keefe, Mary. A 414 Broadway 

April 27, 1S97. Oliver, James W 69 High Rock St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Oliver, William T 164 Allen Ave. 

July 29, 1-901. Osborne, Archer Preble 694 Western Ave. 

Jane I, 1897. O'Shea, William 112 Market St. 

,/<///. 29. 1900. Parke, Emma F * ...... 36 Nahant Place 

April 26, 1900. Parker, Amelia J 37 Phillips Ave. 

Oc/. 26, 1900. Parker, Harriet Fitts 2S Lowell St. 

April 2 -j, 1S97. Parker. John Lord 37 Phillips Ave. 

Jan. 11, 1S99. Barrott, Mary Emily 44 Cherry St. 

Parsons, Katharine M . 106 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1.897. Parsons, Mary A Lynnfield Centre 

' ; Patten, Frank. Warren 370 Summer St. 



02 LYNN HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

April 27, 1S97. Patten, Myra Flanders 370 Summer St. 

Dec. 36, 1901. Paul, Dorcas Ellen 20 Bloomfield St. 

April 27, 1S97. Paul, John M •. 9 Farrar St. 

" Paul, Lucy F. 9 Farrar St. 

il Peirce, Charles Francis _|2 Hanover St. 

Oct. ii, 1S99. Percival, Mary E 79X01111 Common St. 

April 27, 1S97. Pevear, Henry A. . 159 Washington St. 

Marc// io, 1S9S. Pevear, Mary F S7 Beacon Hill Ave. 

April 27, 1S97. Pevear ,, Sarah E 159' Washington St. 

Z?rc. 24, 1S9S Pevear. Waldo 1 87 Beacon Hill Ave. 

Feb. % 1S99. Phillips, Anna Racillia 35 Bassett St. 

April 27, 1S97. Phillip-. Arthur John 35 Bassett St. 

April 27', 1897. Piekford, Anna M 166 Washington St. 

Z^cr. 30, 1901. Pike, Georgianna .29 Breed St. 

April 27. 1S97. Pinkham, Emily G 64 Xahant St. 

/tf/zc 16. 1902. Pond. Carolyn Ashley ... 17 Chestnut St., East Saugus 

Xov. 23. 1S99. Pool. Howard F 72 Johnson St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Pool, Lena B 72 Johnson St. 

April iS. 189S. Porter, Bertha Currier 101 Fayette St. 

A tig. 26, 1901. Porter, Carrie Chi Ids 40 Nahant St. 

Porter. Charles W \o Nahant St. 

April 18, 1898. Porter, Margaret Ellen 101 Fayette St. 

April 27, 1S97". Porter. Thomas Freeman . . . . . . . 274 Summer St. 

April 7, 1S99. Prichard, Charles F. . 17 Sagamore St. 

April 27, 1S97. Putmarij Eugene A 40 Fayette St. 

" Putman, Hannah V 40 Fayette St. 

4i Richards. Tames H 72 Fayette St. 

Feb. 9, 1899. Robinson, Elizabeth F j.7 Commercial St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Robinson, Martha G 19 Walden St. 

June 1, 1897. Robinson, William Pitt 1739 17th St.. Washington, D. C. 

March 12. 1900. Rogers, Abraham L 311 West 97th St.. New York 

" Rogers, Enunelyn S. . . . . 311 West 97th St-., New York 

April 27, 1S97. Rogers, Hamilton Everett 30 King St. 

Rogers, Henry Warren 30 King St. 

" Rogers, Olive A 30 King St. 

July 28, 1S99. Rolfe, Charles E 22 Atlantic St. 

Rowell, Frank B 14 Linwood Road 

April 27, 1897. Rule Elizabeth E So Franklin St. 

May 20, 1S98. Ruppd. EmilF 120 South Common St. 

Ruppel, Myra D. Allen 120 South Common St. 



LYNX HISTORICAL, SOCIETY. 63 

Jan, 17. 1900. Sanborn, Charles S iS King St. 

April i-]. 1897. Sanderson. Howard Kendall 30 Park St. 

Afri/2f, 1S97. Sargent, William P. 151 Chestnut St. 

i; Sawyer, Henry A. . 243 Boston St. 

Jan. 27, 1902.- Schlehuber, Alma 38 Estes St. 

April '.27, 1S97. Scars, Henry Darrah 30 Greystone Park 

July 2S, 1902. Seaward, Savandah x\ 75 Hollingsworth St. 

Apr// 2 7. 1S97. Sheldon, Chauncey C. ...... 49 North Common St. 

,/««. 27. 1902. Sheldon, Lucinda P 10 High St. 

April 27. 1S97. Sheldon, May L 49 North Common St . 

May 3, 1901. Shorev, Martha H 70 High Rock St. 

' l Shorev, Susan E 70 High Rock St. 

" S.ilsbee, Henry 3S Brookline St. 

March 12,1900. Sllsbee, Lillian. 1 60 Breed St. 

Dec. 2S, 1900. Silsbee, Louise E. . . . . . . 118 Green St. 

March 12. 1900. Silsbee, X. Everett 60 Breed St. 

Dec. 30, 1901. Smith, Annie B 232 Ocean St. 

April 21, 1902. Smith, Edward C 60 Tudor St. 

Oct. 2S, 1901. Smith, Florence E 12 Nichols St. 

Jan. 28, 1S9S. Smith, Joseph X 232 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Smith, Mary Abby 640 Western Ave. 

'Sept. 9, 1S9S. Smith, Sarah F .'232 Ocean St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Spalding, Anna H 164 Ocean St. 

" Spalding, Rollin A 164 Ocean St. 

April 27, 1S97. Spinney, Benjamin F 270 Ocean St. 

" Spinney, Sarah S 270 Ocean St. 

Dec. 30. 1901. Spinney, Zephaniah H >,2 South Common St. 

April 27, 1S97. Sprague. , Benjamin 145 Ocean St. 

Jan. 27, 1902. Sprague, Helen M 20 Nichols St. 

April '27, 1897. Sprague. Henry Breed . . ^ Walker Road, Swampscott 

Aug. 26, 1901. Sprague, Laura L ^ Walker Road, Swampscott 

Dec. 30, j 901. Stacey, Hannah M 13 Portland St. 

Apr// 7, 1899. Stetson, Helm Louise 18 Sachem St. 

March 26, 1901. Stevens, Adeline 152 Washington St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Stevens, Charles Goold 147 Washington St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Stevens, Gertrude W 100 Johnson St. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Stevens, Mary B 147 Washington St. 

Dec. 28, 1900. Stevens, Maurice A. . . ". 100 Johnson St. 

April 27, 1S97. Stewart, Samuel Barrett. 141 Ocean St. 

May 20, 1898. Stirnpson, Isabelle Bradford ........ . 24 Sachem St. 

Nov. 24. 1897. Stone, Eliza E 23 Lyman St. 

April 27. 1897. Stone, William 23 Lyman St. 

Oct. 11, 1899. Sweetser. Mary Abby 55 Baltimore St. 



64 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Jan. 10. 1900. Suvi.'t>ci . Man- Anna . . . . Chatsworth Hall, Ocean St. 

April 27. 1807. Sweetser, Moses 174 Broadway 

April '27, 1S97. Symonds, Walter E 57 Xahant St. 

/•V/>. 2, 1901. Symonds, Warren L ^7 Nahant St. 

April 27. \S(j-j. /Tapley, Amos Preston Boston 

" Tapley, Henry Fuller 28b Ocean St. 

" Tapley, Ida J 2 So Ocean St. 

April 27. 1S97. Tarbox, James E 445 Walnut St. 

Oct. 28, 1901. Teal* Harriet E Nahant Road. Xahant 

Dec. 28. 1900. Tebbetts, Georgian a B 37 Baltimore St. 

Jan. 17, 1900. Tebbetts, Kate P 23 Went worth Place 

Dec. 2$, 1900. Tebbetts, Theodore C 37 Baltimore St. 

Oct. 3.S. 1901. Thompson. Fredd O. . 120 Elm wood Road, Swampscott 

April 21, 1902. Thompson. William 1) 10 Violet St. 

Oct. 20. 1902. Thomson, Elihu Monument Ave., Swampscott 

Thomson, Mary I Monument Ave., Swampscott 

June 1, 1897 Tirreil, Sarah E South Weymouth. Mass. 

Jan. 27. 1902. Titus, Augusta C 17 Breed St. 

" - Titus, I. Walton 17 Breed St. 

April 27. 1S97. Tozzer, Samuel Clarence 62 Xahant St. 

March 27, 1900. Tripp, Thaxter N 11 Baltimore St. 

' : Tucker, Bertha B 44 Hamilton Ave. 

• " Tucker, Emma A 44 Hamilton Ave. 

Oct. 20, 1902. Tufts. Lucy R 31 Neptune St. 

April 27, 1S97. Usher, Edward Preston Grafton, Mass. 

; " Van Buren, James Heartt San Juan. Porto Rico 

July 28. 1902. Yiall, Charles S 39 Bloomlield St. 

Jan. 27. 1902. Yiall, Edith L 19 Hancock St. 

July 28, 1902. Yiall, lizzie F 39 Bloomfield St. 

Nov. 23, 1899 Vogel, Frederick M 54 Elm St. 

July 28, 1S99. Walter, Mary E -7-9 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 111. 

Jan. 11, 1899. Warner, Ellen L 17 Baltimore St. 

44 Warner, John G 17 Baltimore St. 

April 27. 1897. *Watters, William 26 South Common St. 

" Whitman, Joseph Henry 10 Sherman Terrace 

May 20, 1S9S. Whiton, Mary Ashcroft . . . Chatsworth Hall. Ocean St. 

Attg. iS, 1902. Whitten. Frank S S3 Exchange St. 

April 27, 1897. Williams. George Hamilton, Woodland Ave., Swampscott 

March S, 1901. Wilson, Alice N 22 Henry Ave. 



LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 6 



March 12, 1900. Wilson, Faustina ChachveU 423 Summi r >■ . 

Jan. 27. 1902. Wilson, Maude E 300 Boston St. 

Oct. 12, 1901. Wires. Harriet A 31 Ocean Terrace 

Wires, W. Marshall 31 Ocean Terrace 

Nov. .-3. 1S99. Witherell, Eunice Smith . 22 Portland St. 

April 27, 1S97. Witherell, Ivers 1 22 Portland St. 

April 27, 1S97. Wood. Lana ] 19 Franklin St. 

<9r/. :o, 1902. Wood, Ruth 19 Franklin St. 

April 27, 1S97. Woodburv. Charles 1- II 61 Commercial St. 

j^Vc. 22, 1S97. Woodbury. Jennie Russell 60 Atlantic Terrace 

April 27, 1S97. Woodbury, John . . . 60 Atlantic Terrace 

" Woodbury, John P. Boston 

April 26, 1900. Woodbury, Maria B 61 Commercial St. 

Jan. 10, 1900. Young. Annah A 19 Garland St. 

" Young. Elbrtdge S 19 Garland St. 

March 26, 1901. Young, Herbert W Schenectady, New York 

* Deceased since 1902 Annual Meeting. 



66 LYNX HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



DECEASED MEMBERS. 



Charles Edward Parsons. David Herbert Sweetser. 

George Henry Rich. Ebexezer Kxowltox Fogg. 

James Albert Breed. Anna Amelia Hood. 

Llcian Xewhai.l. Amos Fraxklix Breed. 

Charles Smith Sweetser. Samuel Hexdersox Greex. 

Charles Otis Beede. Johx Elbridge Hudson. 

Martix Herrick Hood. Martha Louise Newhall. 

Howard Perley. George Washington Flanders. 

George Burrill Currier. Edward Maury Russell. 

Julia Ann Earle. William Francis Hill. 

John Lewis Roblxsox. Charles Coffin Fry. 

Catherine Lloyd Johnson. Joseph Goold Brown. 

Charles Barker Tebjjetts. Anna Maria Warren Symoxds. 



2735